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71 of 75 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LOVED this fourth in the "trilogy"!
I thought the series was finished when Tally Youngblood ended the prettytime and spurred on the changes that allowed everyone to think independently again. But I enjoyed the trilogy so much that I was more than ready for another look into the world.

A few years after Tally and The Cutters brought the mind-rain and ended prettytime, Aya Fuse is a normal ugly...
Published on November 8, 2007 by Gen of North Coast Gardening

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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another patented Westerfeld Ending....
I first read Uglies for my YA lit class, and I loved it. I loved it so much that I went on to read Pretties, and then Specials. And it was after I finished reading Specials that I began to notice a trend, a trend that Extras continues: Westfeld cannot write a decent ending.

Extras begins in an exciting fashion. The world has become completely individualized...
Published on March 12, 2008 by Keary C. McHugh


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71 of 75 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars LOVED this fourth in the "trilogy"!, November 8, 2007
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I thought the series was finished when Tally Youngblood ended the prettytime and spurred on the changes that allowed everyone to think independently again. But I enjoyed the trilogy so much that I was more than ready for another look into the world.

A few years after Tally and The Cutters brought the mind-rain and ended prettytime, Aya Fuse is a normal ugly teen, too young for the optional brain, face, and body surge(ry) that most people choose to have, and too unimportant to do anything exciting.

Her city uses a reputation economy, based on face-rank - the people who are the most important, well-known, and interesting get to do and have the most exciting things. Everyone has their own feed in an attempt to gain a higher face-rank, and Aya's greatest hope for fame is as a kicker, someone who finds and reports on the best stories in their world.

When she meets a group of dare-devil girls who aim to stay unknown, she knows that kicking their story is her chance to make her name. But when they all find some mysterious things in a nearby mountain, the story becomes bigger than Aya could have imagined - big enough to involve the person with the biggest face-rank - Tally Youngblood.

Like all of Westerfeld's books, this one swiftly takes you into a world so different and yet so realistic that you can't help but feel a bit disoriented when you finally set the book down. This was an excellent and enjoyable read, and I hope Westerfeld will write more in this series.
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35 of 37 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars my favorite from the Uglies universe, October 16, 2007
Extras is the fourth book in Scott Westerfeld's critically acclaimed, New York Times bestselling series (originally it was a trilogy). The first three books Uglies, Pretties, and Specials follow Tally Youngblood, a fifteen-year-old girl living in a futuristic world so dominated by plastic surgery that anyone who looks normal is ugly. Extras is set three years after the events of the trilogy unfold, in a different city, with different main characters. The trilogy, however, sets the framework for everything that happens in Extras so while the book is great on its own it definitely assumes you know the story of the trilogy.

In this new world, where everything is changing, being pretty isn't enough to get by. Now it's fame that matters. The more famous you are, the higher your face rank is. A higher rank means more currency in a world where celebrity is everything.

Everyone is trying to get more attention somehow: "tech-heads" are obsessed with gadgets, "surge monkeys" are hooked on the newest trends in plastic surgery, and "kickers" use feeds (think blogs but techier and cooler because it's a Westerfeld idea) to spread the word on all the gossip and trends worth mentioning. But staying famous is a lot easier than getting famous. Just ask Aya Fuse. Fifteen-year-old Aya has had her own feed for a year, but her rank is still 451,369--so low that she's a definite nobody, someone her city calls an extra.

Aya has a plan to up her rank though. All she needs is a really big story to kick. Aya finds the perfect story when she meets the Sly Girls, a clique pulling crazy tricks in utter obscurity. As Aya follows her story she realizes it's much bigger than one clique: maybe the biggest story since Tally Youngblood changed everything.

Some sequels that bring in all new characters are annoying. Not this one. All of the "new" characters are original and, equally important, likable. The story is also utterly original covering very different territory than the rest of the series. It doesn't pick up right where the trilogy left off, but a lot of questions are answered by the end of this book.

Like the other books in the series, this one moves fast. The story has a lot of action and several twists and surprises (some old characters even turn up). The plot is never overly-confusing though. Westerfeld does a great job of creating (and explaining) the futuristic world he has created in these pages so that it truly comes to life on the page.

At the same time, Extras is a very timely book. In a world where everyone seems to have some kind of website and is trying to be more popular or more famous, it's fascinating to read about a city where everything literally depends on your reputation. Westerfeld raises a lot of interesting questions as Aya deals with the ethics of kicking her new story and tries to decide if honesty really is more important than fame.
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33 of 36 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Awesome, October 4, 2007
This book was amazing!! I was a little hesitant when I heard it wasn't about Tally, but it definitely exceeded my expectations. The characters are well written and likable. You find yourself falling into the story, and you cannot put it down until you turn that final page. The end left me yearning for more and I really hope he writes another.
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20 of 25 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Another patented Westerfeld Ending...., March 12, 2008
I first read Uglies for my YA lit class, and I loved it. I loved it so much that I went on to read Pretties, and then Specials. And it was after I finished reading Specials that I began to notice a trend, a trend that Extras continues: Westfeld cannot write a decent ending.

Extras begins in an exciting fashion. The world has become completely individualized since Tally brought down the Pretty system. Aya is a teenage Japanese girl who is completely unfamous in a city that runs on fame. Desperate to become famous, she follows what she thinks will be a story about a group of adventerous girls and discovers instead a potentially deadly secret. And the book just goes down hill from there.

Like Pretties and Specials, Extras begins in a fast-paced, mysterious fashion that completely hooks you in with all of the tantalizing possibilities it offers. And then it slips into a luke-warm middle and concludes in an ending that is not only uninteresting, but completely anti-climatic. I was left with a "Is that all there is?" feeling, a feeling that I have come to realize is typical of a patented Westfeld ending.
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22 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My favorite of the series, October 3, 2007
I was lucky enough to get to read an advance copy of this book (and meet the author) this past weekend. I loved the book! I think it's my favorite of the series, mainly because it relates so clearly to our culture's desire for fame. But I think the world-building is fantastic in all of the books and I was excited to return to that world for this fourth visit. I also enjoyed getting a perspective other than Tally's as well as seeing Tally from someone else's eyes. Aya is terrific, young and prone to making mistakes but trying to do the right thing. : ) A commendable heroine!
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Search for Fame (and Other Things), June 27, 2008
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This, the fourth book in the Uglies trilogy, is in some ways better than the original series, as it provides a fresh viewpoint and new characters to look at the Pretties world after Tally Youngblood's radical revolution.

Aya is a 15 year old in a Japanese city, a city which has re-organized its economy around the idea of fame, or face-rank as called here. As a near faceless extra, with a face rank down in the 400,000's, Aya is driven to find a news story that will propel her to fame as one of the best `kickers' (equivalent to an investigative journalist) around. Accidentally observing a shadowy clique known as the Sly Girls, who for reasons of their own actively avoid fame, doing something both dangerous and fun, she decides that doing a story about this group will be a decidedly great way to help her in her quest to become something other than a nonentity. But the story of the Sly Girls leads her to a much larger story, one with potentially deadly consequences for the entire world, and one which will eventually attract the attention of the person with the #1 face-rank, Tally Youngblood, while at the same time involve Aya in the moral and ethical quandaries that journalism sometimes leads to.

The plot line is good, leading to some very unexpected corners of the world, and Aya is well drawn. The new society portrayed here makes an interesting contrast to that of the mind-hobbled Pretties, as without those mental limitations this new world shows a vibrancy of many different people heading off in all directions, from tech geek-hood to obsessive gossip-generating stunts. There's even some sly satire about things like how some people try to improve their Google rank today with a group in Aya's world who try to artificially boost someone's face rank by mentioned that person's name again and again.

The above is all good, but I found a few things that nagged. There are some technical bobbles, which are difficult to detail without giving away the plot, but I'll give one example. When you accelerate a multi-ton piece of steel to orbital escape velocity in an air-evacuated tunnel, then launch it up into the air, the result will be a very loud bang, hearable for miles around, and this thunder will continue following the projectile for a very long way. This is not good if you are trying to conceal the launch of such a projectile, especially if you are launching hundreds of these objects. There are some plausibility issues with the methods and aims of what turns out to be the `villain' of this story. And once again, as with the original Pretties world, I found that the economic underpinnings of the portrayed society to be too skimpily described and worked-out to make me fully believe in it. These are quibbles, and many readers probably won't notice them amongst the fast action and all the new surprises this book has.

A good follow-up to the original series, with some fresh and original ideas and characters, well worth reading for those who read the first three books.

--- Reviewed by Patrick Shepherd (hyperpat)
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Extras, November 18, 2007
As a huge fan of the original Uglies trilogy, I was excited about this book, although I was also a bit apprehensive. This book doesn't follow the same storyline as the others do. There are all new problems, and Tally isn't the main character. Still, I found that this book was just as interesting and intriguing as the others. I still prefer the first three, and I still think Tally made a better main character than Aya, but this didn't disappoint.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Such a dissapointment, November 29, 2011
By 
Debs (los angeles) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Extras (Uglies) (Paperback)
I enjoyed reading the first three books, but this was terrible. The plot was pointless (it revolves around a "threat" that ends up not being a threat at all). Seems like he had success with the first 3 books so he figured why not make some more money? Not worth your time!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A knockout coda, June 2, 2008
The uglies series was one of the best fantasy trilogies of the new millennium, and the follow-up Extras does anything but disappoint.

This book stars newcomer Aya instead of previous protagonist, Tally Youngblood. However Tally lovers don't fret, for this new world has far from forgotten the wonderful woman. Any lives in a society in Japan that revolves around one thing, popularity. Her life and world is thought-provoking in a way both similar and different then Tally's. She doesn't have to worry about becoming a Pretty or fighting the Specials, she has to deal with a society, and a face-rank, designed to keep the socialites up and the "extras" down.

Her world so very eerily much like our own, is a wonderful "what if" of how our world could turn out. Going off of Scott Westerfeld's spectacular dystopia future, this book explores the very dark questions of fame and those who would want it.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too Much Tally, June 1, 2010
This review is from: Extras (The Uglies) (Paperback)
I loved the first couple of books in the series; they were a brilliant exercise in both world-building and ethics, and the reader learned alongside Tally Youngblood about Special Circumstances and what it REALLY meant to be a Pretty.

I had trouble getting into the third book. Tally's personality seems to be outshined by her latest mental modifications as a Special, and as a result, I found her character increasingly jarring to read about. Never content with simply keeping with the status quo, and not imbued with any obvious super powers to avoid being a pawn of Special Circumstances, Tally's stint as a Special proved the same now-tiring trend of Tally being better than the general population, and knowing it.

It took me a while to pick up the fourth book; quite frankly, Tally bored me. When I finally began paging through Aya Fuse's tech-savvy world, I was drawn back into the universe ... and then Tally showed up anew, and the pace slowed down considerably. There is something about Tally's particular brand of never molding herself to fit whatever society she's decided to upset next that makes her interactions with people aggravating. By the time she shows up in Extras, running roughshod over everyone's opinion and being completely dismissive of anyone's advice, any interest I had in wondering just what the person with the number one face-rank was up to diminished.

Essentially, I wanted to like the series more overall, because it is wonderfully creative and overlooked in so many ways. In the end, however, what drew me into Tally's world was not enough to willingly keep me there.
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Extras (Uglies)
Extras (Uglies) by Scott Westerfeld (Paperback - May 3, 2011)
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