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  • Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (DVD + Ultraviolet Digital Copy)
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Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (DVD + Ultraviolet Digital Copy)


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Product Details

  • Actors: Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Thomas Horn, Viola Davis, John Goodman
  • Directors: Stephen Daldry
  • Writers: Eric Roth, Jonathan Safran Foer
  • Producers: Scott Rudin, Celia Costas, Mark Roybal, Nora Skinner
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Ultraviolet, Color, NTSC, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: French (Dolby Digital 5.1), Spanish (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.77:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: PG-13 (Parental Guidance Suggested)
  • Studio: Warner Home Video
  • DVD Release Date: March 27, 2012
  • Run Time: 130 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (463 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B0077ATSSQ
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,002 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close (DVD + Ultraviolet Digital Copy)" on IMDb

Special Features

Finding Oskar
The journey to find a young actor who could take on the most important role of the film, Oskar Schell. We look at the demands Thomas Horn faced, and the challenges this first-time actor had to overcome as he became a Best Actor nominee. Told through interviews from cast and crew along with film and b-roll footage.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (DVD)

Amazon.com

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close touches the viewer to the very core. In the way that Titanic and The Sweet Hereafter depicted tragedy by pulling back at the pivotal moment, only increasing the heartache portrayed, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close shows the massive losses experienced in New York on September 11, 2001, through the lens of one young boy. Thomas Horn plays Oskar, a boy devoted to his dad (played by Tom Hanks, in flashbacks), who is lost in the attacks on the World Trade Center. The devastation of that day shudders through Oskar's family, including his mother, Linda (Sandra Bullock, in a subdued and affecting turn). Young Oskar is lost in the broken new world, but suddenly finds a purpose: a key left by his father. As Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close progresses, Oskar focuses on the key as a way to connect to his lost father--but finds, instead, connections in the unlikeliest of places. Horn is a wonder in his leading role, and commands attention even as his emotions are scattered. Hanks and Bullock are excellent, as always, though they are more incidental to the film than the viewer might have hoped. Standing out in the cast is Max von Sydow, a mysterious mute whom Oskar meets on the New York subway, and who becomes the most unlikely of guardian angels. Based on Jonathan Safran Foer's best-selling novel, which was able to depict a bit more wry humor to leaven the heartbreak and history lessons, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close nonetheless faces human tragedy straight on, and shows how a broken family can be rebuilt, one small key, one subway ride, one awkward hug at a time. --A.T. Hurley

Customer Reviews

This movie was very boring. didn't like it at all.
Gregory
While Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock and Max Von Sydow are all good in the film, the real star of the film is the boy played by Thomas Horn.
MediaMoogul
This is a very good movie, an interesting story and great acting.
L. Clemens

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

58 of 62 people found the following review helpful By tvtv3 TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on January 21, 2012
Oskar Schell (Thomas Horn) shares an incredibly close relationship with his father, Thomas Schell (Tom Hanks). Oskar is an extraordinary child who has some very particular social quirks. His list is rather extensive and it's revealed that he was once tested for Asperger's Syndrome. However, Thomas Schell spends a great amount of time with his son and does everything he can to help him overcome his fears. However, on September 11, 2001 as the world changes forever, tragically so does the life of Oskar and his mother, Linda (Sandra Bullock), as Thomas was in the second tower of the World Trade Center when it fell. Linda attempts to move on with life, but Oskar refuses to move forward. A year later, he accidently destroys a blue vase while rummaging through his father's closet and discovers a key in an envelope simply marked "Black". Thomas constantly played games with Oskar and led him on journeys around the city, hiding clues and prizes in the most unexpected places. Oskar is convinced the key is a gift left behind by his father to send him on one last adventure. Determined to find the door the key unlocks, Oskar begins a systematic search of the city, trying to locate the person with the last name "Black" who will be able to help him solve the mystery. Along the way, Oskar becomes acquainted with a man his grandmother has been renting a room to. The man seems to have no name and is simply known as "The Renter" (Max Von Sydow). The Renter is a survivor of WWII and reminds Oskar of his father. The two become unlikely companions and friends as they search the city to unravel the mystery of the key.

EXTREMELY LOUD AND INCREDIBLY CLOSE is based upon a 2005 novel by Jonathan Foer. I've not read the novel, so I can't compare the movie to the book.
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95 of 106 people found the following review helpful By C. Tsao on February 24, 2012
Format: DVD
A Boy's Quest in EXTREMELY LOUD & INCREDIBLY CLOSE
Ambitious in concept, Extremely Loud & Incredibly Close is the love story of a troubled boy whose bond with his father transcends death and events beyond his understanding. Director Stephen Daldry (Billy Elliott, The Hours) has put together an interesting study in post trauma and rediscovery. It doesn't always work, but it still registers on an emotional level.

A funeral signals the death of a family member and a boy's alienation to the world. In flashbacks, Oskar (Thomas Horn), who has trouble communicating and may have Asperger Syndrome, adores his father (Tom Hanks) who challenges him with riddles and treasure hunts to meet people outside his apartment. Both father and mother (Sandra Bullock) are loving parents, and the world becomes an interesting laboratory for exploration and discovery. Life is idyllic until 9/11 when everything changes and Oskar is witness to his father's last moments trapped in one of the Twin Towers. A year later, looking in his father's closet, he discovers a key in an envelope with the letters `black'. Who or what does the key belong to? Oskar sets out to find out by systematically tracking down every `Black' in the phone book and visiting each person for a clue. This big scavenger hunt is at best a daunting task.

His grandmother who lives across the street has a mysterious renter (Max Von Sydow) who does not speak and can only communicate by jotting on a note pad or displaying `yes' and `no' written on each hand. The renter takes a liking to Oskar and accompanies him on his quest. This is a search that proves overwhelming as each person they find has a story too.
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25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Frogers on February 3, 2012
Most of us in this country, indeed most of those in the civilized world, has a memory of where they were and how they felt on September 11, 2001. Many, of course, have painful and permanent losses to deal with. For myself, we were far from home on that day, and I truly felt that something of our world had ended. Which, in fact it had. So when it was announced that there would be a movie, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, which would touch on those tragic events, our first response was, "No, we don't think so." Then we learned who was to be in this movie, and the cast included so many of our favorite actors: Tom Hanks, Sandra Bullock, Viola Davis, Jeffrey Wright, Max von Sydow, John Goodman, people we felt we could trust to do such a subject justice, and we said, "Well...." Then we learned more about the story of the film (and story is everything, to us) and we asked ourselves, "How could we not see it?"

And I'm so very glad we did. Everyone is predictably excellent. The story is beautifully done, and at the same time simple and deeply layered. The child actor makes you believe he is dealing with the personal problems of the child character. These problems would be unique and difficult enough, if they did not also include the loss of an incredible father under horrific circumstances, and you share the pain of this family of grandmother, mother and son, while the story is told from so many different directions. Being one of those who cry at Hallmark commercials, I am always loathe to see any movie or play or read any book that wants to make me cry. But this movie is not like that. I did just fine throughout the entire story, experiencing it intensely but dry-eyed. Until the end.
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