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Eye in the Sky Audio CD – Audiobook, CD, Unabridged


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Product Details

  • Audio CD
  • Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (June 26, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1455814334
  • ISBN-13: 978-1455814336
  • Product Dimensions: 6.5 x 0.6 x 5.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (46 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,481,767 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Dick was science fiction’s greatest extrapolator of modern angst.” –New York Daily News

“Dick is entertaining us about… reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation… [He is] our own homegrown Borges.” – Ursula K. LeGuin, New Republic

“It’s beginning to look as though greatness has been thrust upon Philip K. Dick…[He] has chosen to handle…material too nutty to accept, too admonitory to forget, too haunting to abandon.” –Washington Post

“One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction.” –The Sunday Times (London)
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From the Back Cover

“Dick was science fiction’s greatest extrapolator of modern angst.” –New York Daily News

“Dick is entertaining us about… reality and madness, time and death, sin and salvation… [He is] our own homegrown Borges.” – Ursula K. LeGuin, New Republic

“It’s beginning to look as though greatness has been thrust upon Philip K. Dick…[He] has chosen to handle…material too nutty to accept, too admonitory to forget, too haunting to abandon.” –Washington Post

“One of the most original practitioners writing any kind of fiction.” –The Sunday Times (London)
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

Always a joy to read one of the classic SF writers.
Ruth Ann Berry
If you like novels that make you think, if you've always wondered about where your own reality comes from, you will love this little book.
Louis N. Gruber
In this story where religion and reality mutate from one person's mind to the next, we are confronted with the question of what is real.
Eric D. Knapp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

30 of 31 people found the following review helpful By Daniel S. on January 19, 2001
Format: Paperback
The 1957 EYE IN THE SKY is one of the first Philip K. Dick's books you should read if you still don't know this american writer. If I'm not mistaken, it was the first time that Philip K. Dick, in a novel, was treating the theme of the virtual realities.
Eight persons, while visiting the Bevatron, the only pure science-fiction element of the novel, are trapped in a time hole after having accidentally been hit by the Bevatron ray. They wake up in a world that at first is pretty much the same than the one they have just left but they soon realize that they are caught in a world entirely created by the phantasms of one of them.
One can like THE EYE OF THE SKY for numerous good reasons such, for instance, as the slight favour of Agatha Christie's " and then they were none " in it, the reader waiting anxiously for the next imaginary world to appear and the clues that will lead him to the identity of the new dreamer's name. One can also appreciate this book for its critique of the late fifties's american society : The Mc Carthy syndrome, the anti-communism paranoïa or the wave of the evangelism don't have the slightest chance under Philip K. Dick's cruel pen.
With this book, PKD revealed himself as the first class writer he will be during the sixties.
A book for a future PKD fan.
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Eric D. Knapp VINE VOICE on May 18, 2005
Format: Paperback
What more could you expect from Philip K. Dick? Even the title "Eye in the Sky" holds different meanings depending upon how you look at it. In this story where religion and reality mutate from one person's mind to the next, we are confronted with the question of what is real. Is the world around us just in our minds? or is it in someone else's mind? A God-fearing zealot? A paranoiac?

And, of course, religion comes into it, as the question of God vs. Ego rises all the way to the top. All the way to the title, in fact. "Eye in the Sky", as a title, is visualized in the book when two characters ascend (Marry Poppins-like, on an umbrella) to heaven to find themselves floating before a giant eye. That alone, to me, opens up a barrel full of questions about how our desire to look into the sky and find God shapes what we see. But then, being Philip K. Dick, the twist goes further, and we then discover that the eye is not in the protagonists' mind, but in someone else's...

There isn't enough room to ask (or attempt to answer) all the questions that book will raise, which is why it is an absolute marvel of fiction.

One thing that I like about Dick in general is that his books are shorter than most that fall into the genre of science fiction. They are easy to read, are finished quickly, but they raise questions that will leave you thinking long after you've put the book down.

In "Eye in the Sky" my original criticism was that the end came a bit abruptly and was non-conclusive. But then I figured it out, and now I cant stop thinking about how clever and appropriate the conclusion of the story really is.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By EMAN NEP on April 23, 2006
Format: Paperback
It starts innocently enough: A group of tourists are marveling at the invention of a machine called the Bevatron. Suddenly the machine goes haywire (for you gamers out there, imagine the first scene of Half-Life), destroys the walkway high above the machine (where the tourists are) and gravity does the rest.

The next part is weird, which in any PKD book world be normal, I guess. The tourists, having been zapped by the Bevatron are now stuck in a fantasy world that is being generated by one of the members of the tour group--they have no idea who. In that regard there is a slight mystery element to this novel.

In each world the tourists are now tourists yet again, although this time they are tourists within the worlds that someone else has created. One lady is extremely paranoid in real life, resulting in her fantasy world where everything is out to get you (the house scene is wonderful!). Then there is another lady that abhorrs everything bad in real life. In her fantasy world there are no ants, there are no speed bumps. If it annoys or bothers her she won't allow it to exist.

It was an eye-opener reading about how others view the world and what the world would be like if they could have their way. It makes me glad that I live in a world where I can walk into my house and not be afraid of it trying to literally eat me.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 23, 2008
Format: Paperback
Writers are always borrowing from each other, twisting classic literary styles, playing ruthless games with plot and character and logic. This, however, may be the first time I've run across a novel that gets its opening setup from a comic book.

That's not to say that Philip K. Dick intended to ring changes on a comic book, or even that he realized he was doing so - his readers know by now that he got inspiration and ideas anywhere he could find them, consciously or otherwise. I only suggest that readers of classic Marvel comics might find more here to identify with than they suspect.

Anyone who reads those comics, or has seen the movies, knows that the heroes often fall victim to industrial or lab accidents and emerge with super powers. The eight major characters of "Eye in the Sky" literally fall into a linear accelerator, and emerge with powers beyond anything that the Incredible Hulk ever dreamed of. They only get those powers one at a time, though. There goes PKD again, taking a standard story idea and showing us that maybe it wouldn't be such a good deal after all.

Lest some non-reader of comics stop there, however, let me assure you that you won't find any costumed oddballs here and almost no lines of dialogue end with exclamation points, so you're quite safe. Aside from the peculiar originating incident at the atomic energy plant, then, this is mostly a sort of scientific/ontological puzzle. Interesting as a brain teaser, but you have to dig for the human content. Happily, it's there.

Unfortunately, it's also a little dry. Jack Hamilton (the author had not yet developed his gift for interesting character names) loses his job at a missile plant because his wife goes to progressive political meetings and signs peace petitions.
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