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Eye Of The Beholder Hardcover – September 1, 1998

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Editorial Reviews

From Library Journal

These two books, both large and lavish, depict social and cultural life in the various parts of the world through striking color photographs. Eye of the Beholder presents 120 examples of the best work of James L. Stanfield, a staff photographer for National Geographic for 30 years. Stanfield's assignments carried him to many distant locations, and his subjects ranged from the exotic to the familiar. One can dip into this book anywhere and be transported to a different place on any one of the continents, with the exception of Antarctica. Stanfield captures everyday moments of common people as well as grand historical events, such as the coronation of the Shah of Iran and his son. In capturing this sweep, the photographs are engrossing. Thematically, the collection is held together by an interesting biographical essay. An excellent book and a fine tribute to the photographer. In Vanishing Cultures, Magubane documents the customs and traditional beliefs of ten indigenous peoples in his homeland of South Africa. A separate chapter is devoted to each of the peoples, including the Sulus and less well known cultures. Blending a thoughtful description of rituals, religion, artistry, and other aspects of social life, along with an exquisite photoessay, Magubane offers a wonderful introduction to these people. His photographs range from the dramatic action of dances to the quiet dignity of individuals posing in their traditional dress. An excellent example of the best in photojournalism, this deserves a place in public and academic libraries. Stanfield is also recommended for larger public and academic collections of photojournalism.?Raymond Bial, Parkland Coll. Lib., Champaign, IL
Copyright 1999 Reed Business Information, Inc.
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 168 pages
  • Publisher: National Geographic; First Edition edition (September 1, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0792273796
  • ISBN-13: 978-0792273790
  • Product Dimensions: 11 x 0.7 x 12.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,638,307 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 5, 1998
Format: Hardcover
Pack your bags and head off on a 30-year quest to the ends of the earth with Geographic photographer Jim Stanfield! Take a look at the world through the "eye" of a true artist!
His photos will knock your socks off, as you might well expect; National Geographic's never published a book entirely devoted to one photographer's body of work before. But equally precious are the insights you'll get from the photos' captions and absorbing text.
Then, when you're through, set the book aside for a few days, and read it again when you're in a completely different mood. You'll see things that you never even came close to seeing the first time around!
Guess that's what they mean by great art, eh?!
Only one complaint.....haven't heard when the sequel's coming out! Hope we don't have to wait another thirty years!
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Husein Shama on December 21, 1999
Format: Hardcover
As a fan of National Geographic, I always look foward to the spectacular images. This book has plenty of colorful, moving images. But I found myself wanting more images like those in the chapter "The Human Connection". Images of people that gave insight into their lives. My other wish was that we would see 'fresher' work. The images for the most part have been published over the years in Nat. Geo. Magazine. So if you are a subscriber, you will recognize many of the images.
The cover is a mesmerizing image and I wanted more of those images and less of landscapes and macro work of stoneware and such.
I don't regret buying it and there are many things to like. His vision, use of color and the output of his camera leave you wondering how can he get that kind of quality on film.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David Enzel VINE VOICE on August 20, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This is one of my favorite photography books. It covers 30 years of images made by James Stanfield of the National Geographic. The book explains what led to Stanfield making each photograph, which adds greatly to my appreciation of this book. The section on the "Human Connection" will enrich your soul and the entire book is a celebration of life.
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