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Eye Of The Storm: Inside The World's Deadliest Hurricanes, Tornadoes, And Blizzards Paperback – July 4, 2003


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Basic Books (July 4, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0738208914
  • ISBN-13: 978-0738208916
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.7 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.5 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,251,752 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is a must-read for students and meteorologists." -- David Thurlow, Host and Executive Producer of The Weather Notebook radio show

About the Author

Jeffrey Rosenfeld has been editor of Weatherwise, the nation's leading weather magazine for more than a decade. He lives in California.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

16 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Gordon Bowyer on May 10, 1999
Format: Hardcover
What great timing! As we watch in awe pictures of the damage and destruction caused by the Spring tornadoes in Oklahoma, the "EYE of the STORM" comes along to explain the painstakingly detailed develpoment of scientific research of these powerful storms. In a well documented and entertainly written study, one can gain a better understanding of the weather about us and from whence it comes.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By E. A. Lovitt HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWER on September 27, 2005
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Did you ever wonder why the meteorologists who appeared before General Eisenhower in 1944, were able to tell him it would be possible invade Europe on June 6th?

"Eye of the Storm" is a good anecdotal and scientific history of the people who made the successful D-Day weather forecast possible. It ultimately takes its readers to the end of the 20th century, and the technology of satellites and computers.

This author explains how the Wright Brothers and other early 20th century aviators gave meteorology a new kick-start after it had begun to languish at the borders of 19th century technology, e.g. the telegraph and lighter-than-air balloons and zeppelins. But to me, the most amazing chapters in this book deal with the inventiveness and persistence of the 18th and 19th century meteorologists. Much of the theory behind weather forecasting came from their observations.

As a trivial but fascinating example, the largest snowflake on record, a whopping 15 inches in diameter, was reported in the nineteenth century--you can see a photograph of this snowflake at the Guinness World Records site. It fell on Montana in January, 1887 and its discoverer described it as being "larger than milk pans" in the "Monthly Weather Review" magazine.

(Imagine sticking out your tongue and having one of those babies landing on it.)

More importantly, the author also describes how 19th century observers began mapping the motion, pressure changes, and cloud formations associated with weather fronts and storms. They were both organized (via publications and ultimately, telegraph lines) and fascinated by the chaotic phenomena in the skies above them.

Or was weather completely chaotic?
Read more ›
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Brian D. Rubendall HALL OF FAME on February 18, 2001
Format: Hardcover
"Eye of the Storn" is not nearly as exciting as its cover or title would suggests. It is essentially a history of storm forcasting going all the way back to Ben Franklin's time. And while it is informative, it lacks the type of thilling narrative in its weather stories that one would expect. Most of the stories are taken from other books or magazine/newspaper articles. And unfortunately, the author makes at least one serious error by repeating the long standing falsehood that meteorolgist Issac Cline rode up and down the beach on horseback to warn residents of Galveston of the approaching 1900 hurricane. This is a myth, dispelled by the far superior book "Issac's Storm," that just won't die.
Overall, "Eye of the Storm" has plenty of historical information, but the reading is unlikely to have the pulse quickening effect of even a mild spring thunderstorm.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Regina on February 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I used this as one of my recources on a 10 page paper I did in my english composition class, it helped me alot.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Sophomoric in places, but definitely interesting to those of us who enjoy reading about major meteorological events. The presentation is enthusiastic and informative, but it fails to grab you with the journalistic immediacy the author seems to be striving to craft. As a result, the book becomes something of a chronicle, a series of unfortunate weather events, rather than the eye-popper the cover would promise. Bottom line: If you are fascinated by weather (as I am), you will enjoy this book.
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