Currently unavailable.
We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

FBI Secrets: An Agents Expose Hardcover – July 1, 1999

14 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
--This text refers to the Paperback edition.

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
Currently unavailable. We don't know when or if this item will be back in stock.

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

An agent from 1951 to 1977, Swearingen collaborated on two previous books the bureau no doubt hates: Agents of Repression and The COINTELPRO Papers. His new book is autobiographical, tracing his involvement with the FBI from the time he signed on after World War II to his retirement and beyond, as Swearingen began to testify to "FBI chicanery" on behalf of bureau victims. Swearingen began his career doing "black bag jobs" on Communists in Chicago. In Kentucky and New York City, he spent years doing serious criminal investigations, which had been his goal in joining the FBI. But Hoover fixated on the threat posed by such groups as the Black Panthers and the Weathermen, Swearingen explains, and the Constitution once more went out the window. Some of his stories (e.g., the bureau's harassment of Jean Seberg) are familiar, but Swearingen is more explicit than most on the FBI's role in the police raid that killed Chicago Panthers Fred Hampton and Mark Clark and in the framing of Los Angeles Panther Geronimo Pratt for a crime he didn't commit. FBI Secrets won't win awards for graceful prose, but it does shed new light on an important pattern of corruption and repression. Mary Carroll

Review

A former FBI agent exposes the agency's fallacies and wars against political freedom in this country, telling of intrigue, sanctioned murder, and perjury alike. This first-person insider's account will prove intriguing and educational for any interested in secret agency actions. America First! Bill Kauffman Prometheus Books 0-87975-956-9 $25. -- Midwest Book Review --This text refers to the Paperback edition.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 192 pages
  • Publisher: South End Press (July 1, 1999)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0896085023
  • ISBN-13: 978-0896085022
  • Product Dimensions: 5.3 x 0.6 x 7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.3 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,580,958 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 5, 2002
Format: Paperback
The author is a former agent and as such has written the most recent and most authoritative insider account which describes the day-to-day office level details of COINTELPRO (when it functioned illegally). The keeping of secret lists of people to be arrested and sent to detention camps is morally repulsive enough,but the bureau did far more than this. It broke into buildings to gather evidence, planted bugs and incriminating evidence. It used this illegally obtained material to blackmail others, including public figures. It directly interfered in the administration of justice by intimidating witnesses, in some cases having its informants perjure themselves by coming forth with false testimony. It even had people murdered.
Knowledge of such activites is of particular importance now because of the legalization and reestablishment of COINTELPRO which occurred with the enactment of the Patriot Act. This event totally changes the security landscape both for activists and for corporate America. Its implications are guaranteed to be a force chilling to democratic ideals, a new dark period in American history. This book should be a starting point for any corporate strategist charged with maintaining an even foothold as acts of repression unfold. As checks and balances disappear, abuses of power emerge. It is now legal for any federal investigator to demand any business document without court supervision whether it be the reading habits of library patrons, the member rosters of organizations,or the minutes of closed meetings. Any person which reveals the material has been compromised is guilty of a federal felony.
The author describes how he was taught to pick locks and sneak into look for evidence. He had to do it at risk of expulsion from the FBI if he was caught.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Mr. Calvin A. Young on January 11, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Shows how we Americans are really not as free as advertised. FBI did and probably still doing monstrous things to our country. We do need a revolution of ideas and a rising up of our citizens to get back the freedoms given by the founding fathers. This book shows just how insidious Hoover and others acted to take away our freedoms in the name of that freedom. All He was really interested in was his own grandisment and power at the expense of ordinary Americans. Worst of all, so many in Congress went along with him.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
For me the book was mentioned in a lecture that caught my interest to explore in its entirety. I find it interesting when former government workers write to expose certain, not all, acts/activity of their past work to the public. Being a speaker myself I look for factual information to arouse the mind of those who are asleep or think they know, to cause them to be critical and analytically in what they hear and think. I would compare this writing to other items such as: "American Theocracy," "The House that Race Built," and "Confessions of the Economic Hit Man."
My interest in these writings are used for class room study and discussions. They are interesting readings and would only recommend them to those who are looking for more than just a good book. But to those whose mind is set on thinking outside of the box of mediocrity and to take action toward transformation and change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Kenneth R. Kahn on January 23, 2003
Format: Hardcover
After a lifetime of devoted service conducting illegal wiretaps, break-ins and burglaries, known as "black bag jobs" former FBI agent Wesley Swearingen decided to tell all about an FBI that few people really know.
To be fair, government employees, no matter what agency employs them, are awash in an ocean of fraud, waste, corruption and general mismanagement perpetuated by their so called "supervisors." These individuals are generally unemployable, mediocre and incompetent. Thank God for government service, the largest, most pernicious public employment and welfare system in existence next to the Pentagon and its arms suppliers, or they'd be on the streets.
"FBI Secrets" does more than expose specific secrets documenting COINTELPRo-type programs designed to deny and destroy the rights of American citizens to actively engage in political dissent, it exposes the moral dilemma faced by those who perpetuate them. Admittedly, this agent waited until after retirement to expose what he knows; but he reveals to the reader the torment of an agent who became disillusioned with the agency yet had a career to protect.
Swearingen could have simply walked away. it would not have stopped these invasive violations of American's civil liberties but, at least, he would nt have been involved. With hindsight, and through the work of many investigative journalists and authors, information concerning how the FBI violates the civil rights of American citizens is abundantly avaialble.
The history of the founding of the FBI, beginning in 1908 with the corrupt Bureau of Investigation, the Palmer raids, orchestrated by Attorney General Mitchell Palmer and executed by an unknown federal bureaucrat named J.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Russell A. Rohde MD on May 30, 2000
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
"FBI Secrets: An Agent's Exposure" is a chronological narration written by whistleblower M. Wesley Swearingen about his career as Special Agent for the FBI during the period 1951-1977. The marketing forward by Ward Churchill (we are not privy to who he is) notes Wesley had the necessary courage, fortitude and character to reveal the intrinsic wrongness and illegal doings of the FBI over a span of several decades.
Wesley explains how he was able to muster the requisite conscience and personal integrity to expose, albeit belatedly, the bigotry, cheating, lying, burgularizing, wire taps, bugs and unauthorized surveillances he had participated in or witnessed during 25 years as Special Agent. Also emphasized is how the Black Panther Party, the Weatherman (militant college students of the SDS founded by Thomas Haden) and individual top political activists were subjected to harassment, censure and surveillance without due cause.
Swearingen is to be commended for writing about alleged eye-witnessed corruption in the FBI. He effectively indicts himself as a co-conspirator, something which ordinarily adds credence to a confession. As a writer, Wesley's naivete exposes himself as a haughty Special Agent who is troubled with financial and personal security, an over zealous need to make faultfinding remarks of his associates and a total inability to get along with others. Although it fails the rule of "It Takes a King to Unseat a King," the book's content is revealing, easy to digest, reasonably well arranged and does give one pause to ponder.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again