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24 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on January 7, 2010
This film is just great... I have a Polaroid Propack with the Proflash unit... My only suggestion with this film is, double the processing time (time you wait before pulling the backing off) so that you get the contrast the film is famous for...
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27 of 31 people found the following review helpful
on May 26, 2012
BACKGROUND: I've been using this for exposure testing with Hasselblad and Mamiya (medium format) cameras. Yes, some people still use these things without digital backs, especially for educational purposes. For those who aren't familiar with pre-digital medium format photography, these cameras have backs that contain the film which can be removed from the camera without exposing the film. Unlike a 35mm, you can put some instant film into a "polaroid back", load a roll of 120 negative film into a 120 film back, put the polaroid back on the camera to get some instant feedback as to whether your setup is working, take two shots, then switch the back to the 120 for taking the real photos. This was particularly important when you had multiple thousands of dollars invested in a studio setup for a several hour shoot and you needed some assurance that your camera and settings were working properly. You could then switch the backs again when something changed without wasting all of your unused film. This also allowed people to change the ISO on cameras without wasting film before digital sensors. At this point you hopefully have new appreciation for how the average consumer with a $100 camera can now switch ISO settings at will and view their photos immediately.

ACTUAL REVIEW: The FP-3000B works well for what I'm using it for. Using a Sekonic exposure chart, I took a +/- 1 stop 3 shot bracket of the chart with this film to help me calibrate my light meter for the film/camera and test the exposure latitude of the film. The chart basically has gray patches with 50% reflectance in the middle with patches going down and up +/- 2 stops in reflectance in 1/6th stop increments. When properly exposed, the FP-3000B shows detail in the whole 4 stop range of the chart. Given that the lightest patch shows up as barely darker than the white of the paper, and the darkest patch is very slightly lighter than total black, it's clear that the film has a 4 stop (4EV) exposure latitude which is pretty good.

So, if you're using a light meter, just make sure that the darkest significant areas are no more than -2EV from correct exposure and the lightest areas are no more than 2EV from correct and you should get detail everywhere. (If you don't have a dedicated light meter, take a (D)SLR and use the spot meter in that to meter a scene to give you a general idea of what parts of the scene are light or dark enough to render detail.

So, good stuff for fancy expensive medium-formay pro cameras, and no doubt just as good for "vintage" consumer cameras as well. Just don't get the nasty chemicals from the peel-off on your skin or clothing. That stuff is caustic and bleaches fabric.

Glad that Fuji is still making this stuff, even if they've killed off pretty much all other versions of the instant B&W film.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on July 12, 2011
Fuji's FP series of peel-apart films are head-and-shoulders above their old Polaroid counterparts. Color, contrast, resolution, and ease of use are all better than I remember Polaroid being. Only complaint is that there is no negative with the FP films, but so long as the photos keep coming out razor-sharp and colorful, I'll get over it. The FP-3000B is especially handy for low-light or fast-action shots (actual ISO is ~3200).
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful
on April 12, 2009
I'm glad Fuji is still making stock for this format as Kodak has discontinued. I like the fact that it processes very fast. The only thing I would mention is that it is higher contrast film than 667, which could be a good thing or a bad thing.

I will buy more of this film for my Polaroid Land Camera.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
on July 4, 2010
Having tried all three types of fuji pack film, this is by far the best. Not only do the pictures come out with a wonderful dreamy feel, they look incredible! I use the film in my 450 land camera, and the only problem I have is that the first picture never seems to come out.

This stuff is way better than 100b or 100c
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on August 21, 2011
There is nothing like Fuji FP3000 except now-defunct Polaroid 667, which it replaces. Fuji has done a perfect job copying this very high speed instant film that fits millions of still functioning pack film cameras being used today.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 22, 2013
I picked up an old Polaroid 104 Land Camera at a Goodwill store for $5. The camera had an original empty Polaroid film pack and original battery, (I think.) I replaced the battery and put in a new pack of film and the results were great. This film has great contrast and best of all, unlike the old Polaroid film, this is non-terminating film. Meaning that once you expose the film, pull it out of the camera and leave it longer than the recommended time, it won't ruin the film. It'll just develop to a great contrasty photo. I've found waiting around 30 seconds, (twice the recommended time) will give you the best results.

I love how this film looks and the negatives can be kept and scanned later. Be sure to let the developer on the negatives dry sufficiently before scanning or handling.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on October 6, 2012
FP-3000B is compatible with the Polaroid pack film cameras (no Fuji cameras were made for this film). It's main use is for the "focus free" cameras that used very narrow apertures and therefore needed a fast film to get enough light to function. However, it can also be used in the standard packfilm cameras(100, 101, 200-400 series) and the manual Polaroids with an f/4.5 lens can give good low light performance.

It's a contrasty film but has little to no noticeable grain and good rendition. To people who haven't used packfilm it peels apart and yields a print that looks just like a normal photo, people don't know it's a Polaroid unless you tell them.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on February 15, 2012
Fujifilm FP-3000B works great with packfilm cameras. The images came out clear and developed super fast! From my experience, this film comes out a slight bit clearer than the color version (FP-100C).
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on October 26, 2011
The cost of this film breaks down to $1 a shot, so be ready to take quality shots every time. Using this film with a Polaroid Land Camera 440 (no flash, indoor lighting) and it works beautifully.

Chemicals get a bit messy if you're not careful, but that's more a user issue than a product issue.
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