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FX Paperback – November 25, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: IDW Publishing (November 25, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1600102743
  • ISBN-13: 978-1600102745
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 6.4 x 10 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,648,886 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By H. Bala TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 16, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A while ago artist/writer John Byrne made it known that, for an "x" amount of money, he would create a comic book issue for whoever. Longtime comic book reader (and a big fan of Byrne's art) Wayne Osborne took up the man's offer and had Byrne provide illustrations for an original story Osborne had come up with. The result is a complete issue of FX. Osborne then went to the San Diego comic convention and shopped it around until IDW Publishing bit, promising to publish FX as a six issue mini-series, with the caveat that John Byrne be on board to draw the entire thing. And, no worries, John Byrne was on board.

FX is the story of a boy named Tom Talbot. It starts with Tom horsing around with his best pal Jack, when Tom is suddenly struck by a mysterious, radiant shaft of light, and then Jack unwittingly clobbers his skull with a stick. A few days later Tom learns that he's abruptly developed an amazing talent. Merely by using his imagination Tom can now create solid objects out of thin air. Just by goofing around, he's able to call a working bazooka into being. Experimentation leads to Tom finding that he can fly and summon up weapons. His favorite go-to move seems to be tooling around in a robot/golem-shaped construct (or maybe it's a force field?). In a way, Tom's newfound talent reminds me of Green Lantern's ability to manifest solid objects, although Tom doesn't need a paltry green bauble to do his thing.

Naturally, Tom becomes a superhero and takes on the codename FX. And living in a world where talking gorillas and horrible creatures called moleisaurs occasionally erupt from the earth to attack mankind, the fledgling crimefighter quickly gets his feet wet.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Susie Mo on December 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
I love all-ages comics. Tellos, Leave it to Chance and Bone are at the top of my list. And FX belongs right up there with them.

Wayne Osborne has crafted a terrific superhero story about a kid whose imagination comes to life in the form of solid energy constructs. It's got a giant ape supervillain. It's got solid John Byrne art. What more could you ask for?

We need more books like this. Pick it up for you or your kids.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Hwy61Joe on December 18, 2008
Format: Paperback
FX was the most enjoyable superhero series of the year! This collection includes the entire debut mini-series plus some behind the scenes character designs by John Byrne and an introduction by creator/writer Wayne Osborne.
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Format: Paperback
FX, by Wayne Osborne and John Byrne: It's very modern in its
pace, chucking laborious exposition out the window---FX resembles Green Lantern, initially, but Tommy's not Hal.

It's rather more like Nova---but free of that 70's substitution of depression for characterization that makes you want to shake Rich (or Marv Wolfman) and say, "snap out of it, you can FLY, dammit!!"

Tommy and Jack are horse around high adventure style when the bolt from the blue strikes. Suddenly, whatever Tommy envisions, one thing at a time, he can become. Ever run across the yard making a buzz like a plane propeller, pretending to fly? When Tommy Talbot does this, he's surrounded by a yellow energy plane! Just that simple: but it's going to take practice!

We get a few time-honored coinky-dinks (wonder if some of them tie together behind the scenes?). Did not know why the giant ape Silverback could talk, but rolled with it. (Wayne intends to show his cards, some future story. He's still working out some bugs here!)
We get a few time-honored coinky-dinks (wonder if some of them tie together behind the scenes?). Did not know why the Silverback could talk, but rolled with it.

One power manifestation-at-a-time does keep things interesting! Having two vulnerable people and bystanders along does, too.

I have a strong feeling it's oriented towards people in their 30's and 40's (towards their young selves), so we get call backs like
Universal Monsters and combative gorillas. People tired of upping the stakes on grim and gritty get a new comic they wouldn't mind reading with the kids.
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