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Fables Vol. 2: Animal Farm Paperback – August 1, 2002


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Product Details

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Vertigo (August 1, 2002)
  • ASIN: B002AOVTQS
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (97 customer reviews)

More About the Author

Bill Willingham never fought a desperate and losing battle in a good cause, never contributed to society in a meaningful way, and hasn't lived a life of adventure, but he's had a few moments of near adventure. At some point in his life Bill learned how to get paid for telling scurrilous lies to good people, and he's been doing it ever since. He lives in the wild and frosty woods of Minnesota.

Customer Reviews

The story start out intense, no dragging of the plot like the first one.
FireStarBooks
Snow White, the deputy mayor of Fabletown, decides that it would do her sister, Rose Red, good to get out of New York and up to The Farm to do her service.
Andrew
The art is beautiful and the stories are a great mix of drama and humor.
Jace L.

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By B. Bukowski on September 20, 2003
Format: Paperback
Trying to patch up their strained relationship, Rose Red and Snow White travel upstate to visit the Farm where the nonhuman Fables are forced to live; but they run into trouble when they find a revolution-caused by Goldilocks-turn to violence.
Bill Willingham once again creates another winner, improving upon his first story arc with more characterization and some humor. There are numerous litererature references and some of the absurd situations and obscure fable characters are rather humorous. Mark Buckingham's pencils aren't spectactular, but are quite good for portaying the numerous human characters as well as the many animal characters. Buckingham's pencils are very similar to Medina's artwork in the previous arc, but he improves upon the human characters, making them look more dramatic and lifelike.
This book is recommended for readers looking for something different than super hero stories. This new, innovative book is definitely worth checking out.
NOTE: This is a DC/Vertigo book and is suggested for older readers due to language and blood/gore (a comic book equivalent to a PG-13 or R-rated movie).
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By J_M on August 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
Bill Willingham continues to deliver great reading material in his second storyline of the Eisner Award winning series "Fables".
The story is still about the exiled fable-folk and their community existing alongside the mundanes (non-fable folk).
The characters from the first book are back and they are in for a new conflict.

This time the focus of the book moves away from the mythical city of New York and on to "The Farm", where the unfortunate fable folk who cannot pass as humans live in seclusion.
Snow White heads to the farm to try and teach her sister, Rose Red a lesson and hopefully patch things up between them.
They soon find out that the residents are planning to get out of the farm in an all out rebellion.

Willingham did very good on characterization in this book, he gave the characters identity, there are more fable appearances in this book which makes it more interesting. Mark Buckingham did a superb job continuing the designs drawn by Lan Medina.
And like the first book, this trade paperback offers bonus materials such as Bill Willingham's early designs of the characters, and sketches of the covers done by James Jean.
This is one title that every fantasy, fairy tale, mystery, and even crime enthusiast should have.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By wiredweird HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on April 8, 2008
Format: Paperback
This series supposes that the mythical beings from our childhood fairy tales not only exist, but have been forced to flee their native land - arriving in New York City. Some, Snow White for example, can trade her princess' gown for a business suit and get by just fine in the city. Tom Thumb, the talkative three little pigs, and quite a few others would blow the secrecy of their exile in our world. So, the Fables (as the displaced ones call themselves) establish a refuge in a distant corner of upstate New York where the more unusual beings can live in peace and privacy.

But being run out of their hereditary lands galls them, and their isolation and the limits on their freedom chafe. The rhetoric builds up, instigated by Goldilocks (who still finds Baby Bear's bed just right) but pushed forward by the pigs - who suddenly seem to read from George Orwell's script. They're as venal and brutal as Orwell's, but better armed.

The rest of the story carries through on the promise made by the beginning. It offers excitement, imagination, and enough twists and turns to keep the ending in suspense. Well, if not the ending itself, at least the way it comes about. Capable, expressive artwork supports the writing well, even if it doesn't break any new ground. Since a different look in the artwork is usually what grabs my attention, it took me a long time to pick this one up. That was my mistake. You don't have to repeat it. Go ahead, enjoy this grown-up take on some of your childhood favorites.

-- wiredweird
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tin Pham on May 24, 2004
Format: Paperback
In short, this is a refreshing read and worth every penny. If you are testing the waters with the Fables title this is even better than book 1.
The entire story is written in a way that is self-contained and accessible to new readers. Fantasy, humor and politics all come together in this mature but quirky title and you never know what to expect next.
In addition to great writing, the art makes the read seamless and the story believable. Mark Buckingham manages to bring across depth and expressions in talking animals.
This would be the series I use to introduce comic books to non-comic book readers.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Paige Turner on October 12, 2009
Format: Paperback
Bill Willingham's "Fables" is the most interesting concept in comics I've seen in the last few years. "Fables" is right up there with Vaughan's "Y The Last Man" and "Ex Machina." The artwork by is outstanding; it's detailed and realistic. The art moves the story along without being distracting. Like all other Vertigo titles, it is not recommended for children - as an adult I find Fables extremely entertaining.

Fabletown is a part of Manhattan where people and creatures from traditional fairy tales have gone into exile to escape "the Adversary" who has invaded their kingdoms. In Volume 2, "Animal Farm" all of the action actually takes place in the "Farm" in Upstate New York where the Fables go that cannot blend in with normal "mundy" humans in New York City.

In this volume, Rose Red and Snow White go to the Farm and find out that there is a revolutionary element. The story is fast-paced, with an emphasis on character development. Willingham throws in a lot of social commentary and funny allusions, such as hinting at the real reason why Goldilocks decided to shack up with one of the Three Bears. The artists do the same, with "Watchmen-like" detail in each panel; an example is books on a bookshelf by Neil Gaiman and a book entitled "Shreq." I love clever references like that one - the original premise of the movie Shrek was that the Fairytale creatures were being rounded up and relocated - which must have influenced Willingham. This is just a taste of the great stuff that awaits the reader in the Fables series.

Highly recommended! Off to Volume 3!
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