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Fabulous Dorseys (1947)


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Frequently Bought Together

Fabulous Dorseys (1947) + The Benny Goodman Story + Gene Krupa Story, The
Price for all three: $33.48

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Product Details

  • Actors: Jimmy Dorsey, Tommy Dorsey, Janet Blair, Paul Whiteman, William Lundigan
  • Directors: Alfred E Green
  • Writers: Richard English, Art Arthur, Curtis Kenyon
  • Producers: Charles R. Rogers
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Studio: Synergy Ent
  • DVD Release Date: September 20, 2007
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (34 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000W93W4K
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #552,639 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Fabulous Dorseys (1947)" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Music and movie fans alike cheered this Hollywood adaptation of the real-life tale of brothers Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, and its top-drawer musical numbers. Starring as themselves (alongside many of their actual band-members), with actors filling out the remaining roles, these two icons of Big Band, Jazz and Swing recount the rise and fall of their careers, and the long-running 12-year feud that threatened to keep them from ever performing together again. That is, until the death of their music teacher father, when they finally reunite at the behest of a grieving mother.

This product is manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

Customer Reviews

One of the best big-band movies ever made.
William B
I bought this for my brother in law, who absolutely loved it.
Mary
The story is good and the music is, of course, great.
Music Lover

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Susan Emert on September 1, 2004
Format: DVD
I remember watching this movie as a child at my grandparent's house.

I loved the music. The acting was so-so but let's face it. The Dorsey's are not known as actors.

The premise of the movie is quite believable and the music is so typical of the 40's. I love all the movies from that decade.

It's just a good film. Enjoyable and will leave you with a smile on your face. A far cry from today's horrible and violent films. They don't make them like this any more and they should.

If you get to see it, just sit back and enjoy.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Music Lover on March 10, 2007
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
This is a great movie that actually features the Dorsey's themselves. The movie tells the story of Jimmie and Tommy Dorsey growing up and their start to the music business. The story is good and the music is, of course, great. My only complaint is that I wish the story would have featured more about their career and less about how the two couldn't get along and so they went their separate ways until their father died when they made up. It's still a good movie and I do recommend it but if you're like me in wanting to learn more about the career you might actually prefer The Glenn Miller story.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Alan D. Shaffer on April 17, 2009
Format: DVD
I am a collector of the early movies. The stories and music and acting usually are so much better than the average movie today.

This story of the Dorseys was good. The quality of the picture, however, was as if a Dvd was made off of a VHS. This should not be.

Alan D. Shaffer
Creve Coeur, MO
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Format: DVD
Why spend a moment slogging through this awkward and self-conscious movie? Every now and then, after an hour of tedious plot and amateur acting, we start getting bits and pieces of the big band swing that made Tommy and Jimmy Dorsey, separately and together, the great musicians they were. Occasionally -- in a jam session with Art Tatum, with Tommy Dorsey and his orchestra doing "Marie" and, a standout, Jimmy Dorsey and his orchestra fronting Bob Eberle and Helen O'Connell singing "Green Eyes" -- we get a complete song.

Unfortunately, the movie is in the public domain and the DVD transfer is just as bad as the acting. My copy has only four chapter stops. That means you can get arthritis in your fast-forward finger trying to speed through to where the good stuff is. The swamp you're moving through is Hollywood's version of the life and battles of the two Dorseys. Tommy, superb on trombone, and Jimmy, superb on saxophone, usually couldn't stand each other. In 1935 they finally split, with Tommy starting his own orchestra. Each had greater success alone than they had achieved together. They reconciled when their father died in the Forties, which is where the movie ends. They later managed to tolerate each other in the orchestra led by Tommy as the big band era faded out in the Fifties. Tommy died in 1956 at age 51, vomiting in his sleep after booze, pills and a big meal. Jimmy died of cancer at 53 in 1957. Jimmy was hugely talented and, from all accounts, a reasonably easy-going guy. Tommy was hugely talented and, from all accounts, often an overbearing jerk. But good music makes up for a lot of faults, and the Big Band sounds the two created helped define the swing era.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Annie Van Auken TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 16, 2010
Format: DVD
Standard kicks against THE FABULOUS DORSEYS are the non-acting skill of its leads, a lack of personal detail (such as the two youngest siblings not getting a mention) and its episodic story. True enough on all three counts, yet I saw this movie recently for the first time and found it thoroughly entertaining.

As depicted here, after years of feuding the Dorsey boys permanently split during a live performance at the Glen Island Casino, when Tommy stormed out due to a beef over tempo. Jimmy kept the Dorsey band, Tommy molded the Joe Haymes unit into his own orchestra (this last detail isn't explained).

After his acrimonous parting with Tommy in 1942 it's no surprise that Frank Sinatra's not included nor is his existence even acknowleged, but why the brothers' mid-20's stint in the California Ramblers gets no mention is curious. Their association with this renowned group of NY studio musicans led to the formation of their own recording outfit, with some of the Ramblers (like legendary bass saxist Adrian Rollini) joining them. Others who worked in-studio with the Dorseys between 1928 and '33: Jack Teagarden (trombone), Mildred Bailey (vocals), Frank Signorelli (piano), Glenn Miller (trombone), Bob Crosby (vocal), Bunny Berigan (trumpet), Johnny Mercer (vocals), Phil Napoleon (trumpet), Joe Venuti (violin) and Stan King (drums).

Regardless of how accurate a bio this is or how unpolished Jimmy and Tommy are as actors, musical performances are what the picture's really about. Jimmy's "Green Eyes," with vocals by Bob Eberly and Helen O'Connell, and Tommy's "Marie," with Stuart Foster taking over for Jack Leonard and everyone shouting refrains behind him, are delightful. Tommy also solos on his signature number, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Annie Van Auken TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 16, 2010
Format: VHS Tape
Standard kicks against THE FABULOUS DORSEYS are the non-acting skill of its leads, a lack of personal detail (such as the two youngest siblings not getting a mention) and its episodic story. True enough on all three counts, yet I saw this movie recently for the first time and found it thoroughly entertaining.

As depicted here, after years of feuding the Dorsey boys permanently split during a live performance at the Glen Island Casino, when Tommy stormed out due to a beef over tempo. Jimmy kept the Dorsey band, Tommy molded the Joe Haymes unit into his own orchestra (this last detail isn't explained).

After his acrimonous parting with Tommy in 1942 it's no surprise that Frank Sinatra's not included nor is his existence even acknowleged, but why the brothers' mid-20's stint in the California Ramblers gets no mention is curious. Their association with this renowned group of NY studio musicans led to the formation of their own recording outfit, with some of the Ramblers (like legendary bass saxist Adrian Rollini) joining them. Others who worked in-studio with the Dorseys between 1928 and '33: Jack Teagarden (trombone), Mildred Bailey (vocals), Frank Signorelli (piano), Glenn Miller (trombone), Bob Crosby (vocal), Bunny Berigan (trumpet), Johnny Mercer (vocals), Phil Napoleon (trumpet), Joe Venuti (violin) and Stan King (drums).

Regardless of how accurate a bio this is or how unpolished Jimmy and Tommy are as actors, musical performances are what the picture's really about. Jimmy's "Green Eyes," with vocals by Bob Eberly and Helen O'Connell, and Tommy's "Marie," with Stuart Foster taking over for Jack Leonard and everyone shouting refrains behind him, are delightful. Tommy also solos on his signature number, "I'm Getting Sentimental Over You.
Read more ›
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