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The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 364 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books; First Printing edition (May 30, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1591024757
  • ISBN-13: 978-1591024750
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.3 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #688,649 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is a wonderful introduction...You may end up amazed and incredulous."

- Leon M. Lederman, Nobel Laureate


“The mathematics in this book is a delight: surprising, insightful, and comprehensive… the result is by turns rigorous, entertaining, and eye-poppingly speculative.”

-New Scientist 
 

“…a work that, although aimed at a general audience and presupposing no knowledge of mathematics beyond the high school precalculus level, succeeds in entertaining all audiences…Educators, as well as the mathematically curious, are encouraged to pick up this volume. The discussions of Fibonacci numbers in nature, art, architecture, and music are very thorough…highly recommended.”

 -Choice


“The authors have breathed life into what could be considered a fairly dry subject by demonstrating how commonplace items make use of the Fibonacci numbers…there is a great deal of math involved but taken step at a time, it is not that difficult to understand and this understanding leads to a an even greater appreciation of everything from a flower garden to classical music. Overall, this is an interesting if challenging read for the layperson and a gold mine for the mathematically inclined.”

-Monsters and Critics 
 

“…the authors have presented a compelling and well-developed book, and one that might well make converts out of some hard-core math phobics…an elegant book that enhances their argument that mathematics is ‘the queen of sciences’.”

-Education Update 
 

“…delightful…accessible to anyone who enjoys or enjoyed high school mathematics. Mathematics teachers from middle school through college will find this book fun to read and useful in the classroom. The authors consider more properties, relationships, and applications of the Fibonacci numbers than most other sources do…I enjoyed reading this book…a valuable addition to the mathematical literature.”

-Mathematics Teacher

About the Author

Alfred S. Posamentier is dean of the School of Education and professor of mathematics education at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, New York. Previously, he had the same positions at the City College of the City University of New York for forty years.  He has published over fifty-five books in the area of mathematics and mathematics education, including  Pi: A Biography of the World's Most Mysterious Number (with Ingmar Lehmann). 
 
Ingmar Lehmann is retired from the mathematics faculty at Humboldt University in Berlin. For many years he led the Berlin Mathematics Student Society for gifted secondary-school students, with which he is still closely engaged today.  He is the coauthor with Alfred S. Posamentier of The Secrets of TrianglesThe Glorious Golden Ratio, and three other books.


More About the Author

Alfred S. Posamentier (River Vale, NJ) is the dean of the School of Education and professor of mathematics education at Mercy College in Dobbs Ferry, NY. He was formerly the dean of the School of Education and professor of mathematics education at the City College of New York. He has published over forty-five books in the area of mathematics and mathematics education, including The Pythagorean Theorem: The Story of Its Power and Beauty; Math Charmers: Tantalizing Tidbits for the Mind; and (with Ingmar Lehmann) Mathematical Amazements and Surprises; The Fabulous Fibonacci Numbers; and Pi: A Biography of the World's Most Mysterious Number.

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars
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If you enjoy numbers you will love this book.
T
It describes the actual sequence, then demonstrates the connection that the numbers have to the natural, as well as to the world of the visual arts and of music.
Claudia Etheridge
This is in line with many poorly presented diagrams showing an editorial and author lack of visual sense.
John Sharp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

148 of 152 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 26, 2007
Format: Hardcover
This is a beautifully produced book. The front jacket is amongst the most attractive I have seen and the back cover is dense with quotations from reviews singing its praises, including one from a Nobel Laureate. Oh dear, how we can be deceived by outside appearances! The text contains so many errors, misleading statements and moments of such stupidity that to discuss them all would require a volume about equal in size to the original.
Let me take you through a few examples: -
Page 21. 41/12 is neither a square number nor an integer as claimed in the text.
Page 22. There is no contradiction in Fibonacci stating that the problem under discussion is indeterminate and for him then to give a (correct) solution to it.
Page 33. The proof of Property 2 given in appendix B is a proof by contradiction, not a proof by induction as stated.
Page 34. Many of the factors listed in Figure 1-9 are wrong. See, for example, the factors given for the sixth Fibonacci number.
Page 40. Figure 1-11 is confusing. What is the rectangle on the RHS supposed to indicate?
Page 48, Figures 1-14 and 1-15. Contrary to their captions, both would seem to contain an odd number of rectangles.
Page 49. Line 7 and line 18 are identical, lines 8 and 19, to which each is supposed to be equal, are not equal.
Page 49. Line 20. 1156 does not equal 342, and 342 is not the 29th Fibonacci number.
Page 51, last line but one. 520 is not the product of 18 and 29.
Page 56. The written summary of property 13 is wrong.
Page 80. Footnote should read `fourth difference', not `third difference'.
Page 82. Why express amazement that, in a table of differences for the Fibonacci sequence, each new line of differences repeats the original sequence.
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32 of 33 people found the following review helpful By John Sharp on November 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
There is a lot of good information here, where the maths is standard.
Unfortunately the book is very sloppily written and badly edited.
Some ideas are well referenced, but others are not attributed, like the Odom construction from the equilateral triangle in a circle.
It contains lots of errors and the usual extrapolations that are not valid.
For example, the nautilus shell is said to be golden section without any proof (it has nothing to do with the GS) and the cover perpetuates that myth.
The Art section is very bad with the usual chosing of data and stretching it to fit the hypothesis. Better to read Mario Levi's book to see why this is rubbish. This is in line with many poorly presented diagrams showing an editorial and author lack of visual sense. For example figure 2-22 is squashed horizontally.
There are lots of lists of what people say on the internet with no critical views as if they are trying to sell the book because of this popular view. This perpetuation of mis-information clouds one's ability to believe the rest of the book.
It's very sad that what is mostly a good collection is so shoddily presented and mixed up with great deal of wrong information.
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25 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Claudia Etheridge on August 30, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The book provides much of the available information on the Fibonacci numbers. It starts with the life of Leonardo da Pisa, the man who first introduced the numbers to the world almost a thousand years ago. It describes the actual sequence, then demonstrates the connection that the numbers have to the natural, as well as to the world of the visual arts and of music. Even the stock market is not immune of the influence of the Fibonacci sequence.
What particularly impressed me about this book is the clarity with which the authors present the subject. Whether you are a mathematician or simply have an inquisitive mind, you will always know the exact meaning of the subject under discussion. In fact, you can skip the (sometimes) long mathematical formulae and still never lose track of the narrative.
A wonderful book that makes one ponder on the origin and significance of the created world. A must for mathematicians, scientists and generally educated individuals. A must also for those who believe that our universe and all its contents are only the product of a series of coincidences. These people may change their minds after becoming familiar with the Fibonacci numbers.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Bruce R. Gilson on November 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
It was very hard to assign a star rating to this book. There are thingss I like very much, and others I definitely do not.

On the good side, it is a very attractive presentation of the beautiful patterns appearing in the mathematics of the Fibonacci sequence. It is not quite as heavy on the mathematics as Dunlap's or Vajda's books (which may make it an easier read for those whose math isn't as strong as mine!) but what it does, it does very nicely, using tables and pictures to make the patterns very clear.

On the bad side, I wish the authors would not accept so credulously such myths as the one of Greek architect Phidias' using the golden section in his design (this has already been debunked by Livio) or the numerological nonsense promulgated by people who try to spread the idea that the Fibonacci sequence can be used to predict the stock market. People following such misguided ideas are likely to lose their shirts, so this sort of credulous myth-spreading is dangerous, not just bad judgment.

So how do you rate a book with so much good and so much bad in it? I've given it 4 stars because the good parts are so good. If the authors had spared us the myths, I would have given it 5.
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