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Gooney The Fabulous (Turtleback School & Library Binding Edition) Library Binding – March 24, 2009


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 7 and up
  • Grade Level: 2 and up
  • Library Binding: 94 pages
  • Publisher: Turtleback (March 24, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0606075305
  • ISBN-13: 978-0606075305
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 5.4 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #10,388,513 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 1–3—Gooney Bird Greene returns for a third installment. Here, her second-grade class is learning about fables. In typical Gooney fashion, the precocious child takes over her classroom by suggesting that everyone write a new fable. Mrs. Pidgeon encourages her enthusiasm by letting her direct the project, and each subsequent chapter is dedicated to a student's work, including one fable about a T. rex done as a rap, concluding with, "Big mean nuthin' if you don't do school!" Given the age of these children, they are amazingly adept at writing, reading, and giving presentations, and they run into only minor glitches with their fables. While it is refreshing to hear from the other members of the class so clearly dominated by Gooney Bird, their creations lack the zest that hers usually have. Fortunately, her eccentric outfits and words of wisdom are peppered throughout to keep the story moving along while Thomas's characteristic black-and-white illustrations provide nice visuals. Full of new vocabulary words and information about fables, this slightly didactic first chapter book is a must for Gooney Bird fans.—Julie Roach, Cambridge Public Library, MA
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Booklist

Second-grader Gooney Bird Green returns in this story with a moral. After Miss Pidgeon reads her class an Aesop's fable, the kids write their own stories with a message. As in previous books, Gooney takes the lead, as much of a junior teacher as she is kid. The recitation of five or six original fables becomes a bit boring, but Lowry nicely individualizes her characters and gets readers interested in their problems. It will take good primary-grade readers to tackle this; it may work best as a read-aloud. Ilene Cooper
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
5 star
94%
4 star
6%
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See all 17 customer reviews
My class of third graders love Gooney Bird!
Amazon Customer
The Gooney Bird books are fabulous for teaching students about writing... Plus, my 2nd graders love the stories!
Debra Willsie
It has good messages, teaching moments and is fun to read.
Windswept

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Midwest Book Review on June 10, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Lois Lowery's GOONEY THE FABULOUS presents grades 2-5 with a fine easy reader telling of Mrs. Pidgeon, who has been reading fables to her second grade class. But Gooney Greene isn't content with hearing fables: what if each child creates his or her own fable and tells it to the class? Her idea sparks interest and new challenges in this latest Gooney story of a win-win girl's ideas.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Glenna R. Boldrick on May 26, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Gave this as a gift to my granddaughters. They love it. It's a book they request their mom and dad read to them over and over.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Ignore the cover art (assuming you find it as off-putting as I do), this is a really good book. My 10 year old loved it. She found the fables interesting, and liked that one character told his as a rap. She read me parts of it and it was funny and clever. It opened up some very nice conversations about what a fable and moral is and about the meaning of several of the fables. Even encouraged her to create her own fable.

She's a kid who doesn't really love to read, and she said, with suprise, "Mom, I really LIKE reading this book. It's funny and intersting." Woo hoo! A winner, for sure!
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By S. Barnes on March 15, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Every Gooney Bird book has a writing going on of some kind...fables, poetry, play, etc. Lois Lowry works in so naturally. My kids love Gooney Bird and the other kids in the class as well, with the array of characters there's one each student can relate to...I was surprised to learn from a YouTube interview that the author was not like Gooney Bird as a child, she was the quiet kid that looked at the floor. Gooney is a keeper!
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By JazzPreacher on March 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Your stories are the best of all gooney loves: adventures,telling stories and much more thank you for making these wonderful stories. The people that read your stories and their probably proud of you and and so am I 💝
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I wish my daughter's best friend was Gooney Bird Greene because she would always be having an adventure doing everyday stuff. I read this book and it's sequel to my 4 year-old-daughter, and being a former teacher, found the characters were very realistic. It has good messages, teaching moments and is fun to read.
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By Amarinderjit Nagi on August 18, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book provided is a very interesting reading for youngsters; my grandson loved reading it and enjoyed it every bit.
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By Debra Willsie on December 13, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The Gooney Bird books are fabulous for teaching students about writing...
Plus, my 2nd graders love the stories!
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More About the Author

Lois Lowry is known for her versatility and invention as a writer. She was born in Hawaii and grew up in New York, Pennsylvania, and Japan. After several years at Brown University, she turned to her family and to writing. She is the author of more than thirty books for young adults, including the popular Anastasia Krupnik series. She has received countless honors, among them the Boston Globe-Horn Book Award, the Dorothy Canfield Fisher Award, the California Young Reader.s Medal, and the Mark Twain Award. She received Newbery Medals for two of her novels, NUMBER THE STARS and THE GIVER. Her first novel, A SUMMER TO DIE, was awarded the International Reading Association.s Children.s Book Award. Ms. Lowry now divides her time between Cambridge and an 1840s farmhouse in Maine. To learn more about Lois Lowry, see her website at www.loislowry.com

author interview
A CONVERSATION WITH LOIS LOWRY ABOUT THE GIVER

Q. When did you know you wanted to become a writer?

A. I cannot remember ever not wanting to be a writer.

Q. What inspired you to write The Giver?

A. Kids always ask what inspired me to write a particular book or how did I get an idea for a particular book, and often it's very easy to answer that because books like the Anastasia books come from a specific thing; some little event triggers an idea. But a book like The Giver is a much more complicated book, and therefore it comes from much more complicated places--and many of them are probably things that I don't even recognize myself anymore, if I ever did. So it's not an easy question to answer.

I will say that the whole concept of memory is one that interests me a great deal. I'm not sure why that is, but I've always been fascinated by the thought of what memory is and what it does and how it works and what we learn from it. And so I think probably that interest of my own and that particular subject was the origin, one of many, of The Giver.

Q. How did you decide what Jonas should take on his journey?

A. Why does Jonas take what he does on his journey? He doesn't have much time when he sets out. He originally plans to make the trip farther along in time, and he plans to prepare for it better. But then, because of circumstances, he has to set out in a very hasty fashion. So what he chooses is out of necessity. He takes food because he needs to survive. He takes the bicycle because he needs to hurry and the bike is faster than legs. And he takes the baby because he is going out to create a future. And babies always represent the future in the same way children represent the future to adults. And so Jonas takes the baby so the baby's life will be saved, but he takes the baby also in order to begin again with a new life.

Q. When you wrote the ending, were you afraid some readers would want more details or did you want to leave the ending open to individual interpretation?

A. Many kids want a more specific ending to The Giver. Some write, or ask me when they see me, to spell it out exactly. And I don't do that. And the reason is because The Giver is many things to many different people. People bring to it their own complicated beliefs and hopes and dreams and fears and all of that. So I don't want to put my own feelings into it, my own beliefs, and ruin that for people who create their own endings in their minds.

Q. Is it an optimistic ending? Does Jonas survive?

A. I will say that I find it an optimistic ending. How could it not be an optimistic ending, a happy ending, when that house is there with its lights on and music is playing? So I'm always kind of surprised and disappointed when some people tell me that they think the boy and the baby just die. I don't think they die. What form their new life takes is something I like people to figure out for themselves. And each person will give it a different ending. I think they're out there somewhere and I think that their life has changed and their life is happy, and I would like to think that's true for the people they left behind as well.

Q. In what way is your book Gathering Blue a companion to The Giver?

A. Gathering Blue postulates a world of the future, as The Giver does. I simply created a different kind of world, one that had regressed instead of leaping forward technologically as the world of The Giver has. It was fascinating to explore the savagery of such a world. I began to feel that maybe it coexisted with Jonas's world . . . and that therefore Jonas could be a part of it in a tangential way. So there is a reference to a boy with light eyes at the end of Gathering Blue. He can be Jonas or not, as you wish.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#7 in Books > Teens
#7 in Books > Teens

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