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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No, the Five Star Rating is not a Typo
Some of the people below can complain all they want and slag the band for carrying on without Keith. They can also tell you how dreadful they think this album is because everyone has an opinion, but the truth is they are wrong. If Face Dances doesn't agree with your musical taste, then fine, but the problem doesn't lie in the quality of the songs or musicianship.
As...
Published on October 17, 2001 by Eric

versus
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars CD remaster makes the best of a patchy affair
I don't have this at the moment - the first copies of this remaster had a faulty track which had been wrongly mastered (It's In You) and although MCA in the US fixed it, Polydar UK don't seem to have bothered! So British Who fans, buy yourself an American copy from Amazon! "Face Dances" was always a hit and miss affair - but it's not half as lousy as...
Published on February 4, 2000 by Jules


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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No, the Five Star Rating is not a Typo, October 17, 2001
By 
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Some of the people below can complain all they want and slag the band for carrying on without Keith. They can also tell you how dreadful they think this album is because everyone has an opinion, but the truth is they are wrong. If Face Dances doesn't agree with your musical taste, then fine, but the problem doesn't lie in the quality of the songs or musicianship.
As along time Who fan, I'm not going to try and convince anyone that this album is as good or better than Tommy or Who's Next,but it is as good or better than some of their work. Despite what other's may say, all the songs here, both Pete and John's, are great songs. You Better You Bet, Cache Cache, Don't Let Go The Coat, and Another Tricky Day are as catchey and well contructed as anything Pete has done and the Quiet One and You are definitely two of the best songs Entwistle has ever written. The Quiet One and You are also as abrasive and raw as any studio tracks the Who ever did. Those songs come as close to the claasic Who live sound as anything.

I would also like to say that I was as sad as any other true fan when Keith Moon died,but I don't feel the rest of the band betrayed his memmory by carrying on. I also think that trashing Kenny Jones is pretty childish as well. I don't know if any of the other critics below are musicians or not, but I am and I thought Kenny's playing on both Face Dances and It's Hard was very impressive. He may not have had the frenzied , almost out of control style that made Keith so great, but his inventive use of varied rhythms and beats had alot of impact on the songs here.
The bottom line here is, Face Dances may not be the best Who album, but it is a very good one.
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12 of 12 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Unfairly Maligned, July 1, 2008
By 
Paul Phipps (Western Massachusetts USA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
I love this album. That may have something to do with the fact that it was the first Who album I ever bought (I was 14). But I also think the songs are great. They remind me a bit of the mid-sixties "Pop Who" as they bounce, snip and snipe. Kenney Jones does a fine job, and it's unfortunate that he's gotten so much flack for accepting the bands offer to join. Of course he's not Keith Moon! No one is.
The only issue I have with this album is in the production. If they'd taken off even just a bit of the gloss it would have made a vast improvement I think. There's something a bit flat about the production. Though Bill Symczek (or however you spell his name) shouldn't necessarily take the blame either. The Who must have been familiar with his work - and for California rock such as The Eagles his production worked - but for The Who not so much. The band chose him though, so it's on their shoulders. Still though, I consider this a very underrated album. Songs like Don't Let Go The Coat, Another Tricky Day, You Better You Bet, and Entwistle's The Quiet One. There's a lot of humor to much of the material as well. It's the Who getting back to the more Pop approach they'd had early in their career. If the production hadn't taken the balls away from the sound then I think fans would have been more forgiving. Anyway, great album cover too! Enjoy!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars CD remaster makes the best of a patchy affair, February 4, 2000
By 
Jules (Birmingham, England) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
I don't have this at the moment - the first copies of this remaster had a faulty track which had been wrongly mastered (It's In You) and although MCA in the US fixed it, Polydar UK don't seem to have bothered! So British Who fans, buy yourself an American copy from Amazon! "Face Dances" was always a hit and miss affair - but it's not half as lousy as "Who Are You" (Moon or no Moon!). Best tracks are Another Tricky Day, You Better You Bet, Daily Records, You and one of the contemporary bonus cuts Somebody Saved Me (which Pete later did as a solo effort) - this CD is well worth it for these songs, but only if you've bought the more essential Who albums already ("Sell Out", "Tommy", "Who's Next", "Quadrophenia", "Odds & Sods", "Who By Numbers" and either the box set or a good singles/best of package like "Meaty Beaty Big & Bouncy").
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Ones Getting Fooled Again, June 6, 2010
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
It's kind of hard to realize sometimes this album came along a decade after one of The Who's classic albums Who's Next. The interesting thing about this album to me is I've often used it as an example of an album that's been issued a lot when a lot of other albums that are truly lost classics remain just that-lost. Now that doesn't exactly change my opinion of this album within it's place in The Who's catalog. It's hard not to hear this album and realize that the last time they hit the studio and the record racks with Who Are You Keith Moon was still alive and still with the band. Well by now he was gone and Kenney Jones,who'd been working with the band live for the past three years or so finally joined them on their first studio outing since Moon's passing. More than a member of the band had passed;an era had too. In the early 80's any pop music form perceived as extravagent in any way,from disco to progressive rock were more or less being frozen out of the mainstream in favor of new wave and other,more sussinct styles of music. Weather or not one chooses to look at The Who as a prog rock or hard rock band is beside the point;this just wasn't really the time for any of that. One thing in their favor was both Pete Townsand and John Enstwistle's abilities at crafting great pop songs and coming up with musical ideas that rocked with a sense of genuine emotion,intelligence and creativity. What's interesting here is that while their are some harder edged guitar rockers here such as "The Quiet One","Don't Let Go The Coat","How Can You Do It Alone" and "You" (Pete has to have something to smash guitars to,right?) actually have just the amount of emotion to make their link to their 70's sound a little easier to take for more "keep it real" 80's underground rockers who were looking to laugh The Who off the planet by this time as a dinasaur band. Pete Townsand provides two excellent pop/rock tunes in "You Better You Bet" and "Another Tricky Day" and other songs such as "Did You Steal My Money","Daily Records" and "Cache Cache",via musical references to people like Todd Rundgren and Hall & Oates such as tight vocal harmonies and stop/start rhythms actually owe something to a kind of modernized version of The Who's R&B roots. For a band that once proudly covered Motown hits in their early years the disco freeze out made anything that smacked of R&B dance music as "unhip",even if rock stars were doing it. Well at least The Who had the balls enough not to forget where they came from on those songs. The bonus tracks feature the likeminded "I Like Nightmares",the more dramatic "It's In You" and the strong,Stonesy rocker "Somebody Saved Me". All these songs were unreleased from these sessions and all written by Pete Townsand. The bonuses round off with hard rock live versions of "How Can You Do It Alone" and "The Quiet One",both edgier and more guitar solo oriented than the studio versions. This is definately not The Who's greatest album but it's certainly a very strong and actually pretty inventive album for something from a re-imagined group lineup making a comeback album in an entirely new decade.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars THE QUIET ONE, August 5, 2012
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This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
This album is worth buying just to listen to John Entwistle rip through the blistering "The Quiet One" but a lot of folks would want to get it as the one that has "You Better You Bet". Both songs are great. This album as far as The Who go is one of the more pop oriented albums but that's not a bad thing. Pete Townshend really puts his heart and beliefs in all of it. It is a really good album. Enjoy.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The Who Enters Another Uncomfortable Maturity, November 21, 2003
By 
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This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
The Who, especially Pete Townshend, had been unhealthy in dwelling on the fact that they were getting older ("older" being your 30s in rock and roll) since the mid 1970s on albums like "The Who By Numbers" and "Who Are You." In 1978, legendary madcap drummer Keith Moon died, an event that forever shattered the band, and two years later, "Face Dances" reveals a group in a state of uncomfortable maturity and a yearning for wisdom.
Other albums, such as "Who's Next" allowed for The Who's growing maturity to be seen, but in those days, it was still with youthful arrogance. This is what makes "Face Dances" so unique. The Who are found in a frantic daze of disillusionment, unleashing track after track of enthralling energy.
The sound within packs a solid punch, in a vaguely pop-oriented feel, such as that of 'Cache Cache' and the excellent Top 10 single 'You Better You Bet,' as the mood is generated in a much more frenetic fashion in 'Daily Records,' 'You,' and 'Another Tricky Day.' Other songs like bassist John Entwistle's ironic self-portrait 'The Quiet One' and 'Somebody Saved Me' are minor Who classics. Kenney Jones, Keith Moon's replacement, proves himself to be a competent drummer, while Roger Daltrey's angry cries punctuate the album with essence.
Though it is without the pinnacles of other albums, "Face Dances" is definitely a worthy set. This album was the next-to-last studio album for The Who however, revealing the band's loss of desire, a fact which bitterly attaches itself to the songs here.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Worthy Latter-Day Effort, November 12, 1999
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
It's certainly not The Who at its best, but there are some outstanding tracks on this album, particularly "Another Tricky Day," which is probably the band's most under-rated song. There's no way to recapture the Who of the 1970s, but Face Dances does present a mature, forward-looking band that is still committed to making poweful music. While the lyrics are overly personal at times, they do reflect the outlook of grown men, not the effort of aging rockers clinging to their teenage longings. In that sense, the Who succeed here at aging gracefully and maintaining a commitment to rock-and-roll. Give it a try -- after a few listens you might be surprised at how powerful, catchy, and subtle some of these songs really are.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Not God-Awful, but not good either., December 29, 2000
By 
"mbill_666" (Houston, TX USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Pete Townshend can write great songs, and these aren't bad. But the only reason to buy this album is to help complete your WHO collection. The only really good song is "You Better You Bet". So unless you are a hardcore WHO fan (like myself) and need to complete your collection, buy something from their earlier days. I recommend "Who's Next" if you want their best...then go from there!
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14 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Has to be appreciated in context, August 25, 2004
By 
Anyechka (Rensselaer, NY United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Honestly speaking, this is the band's weakest album along with being their most-hated. A number of factors make people hate it so strongly, such as Kenney Jones's drumming not matching the kind of drumming Keith Moon did, the songs being too poppy and not rocking enough, lame lyrics, and it just being a bad period for the band in general. Still, taken in context of everything that was going on for them during this period, it's remarkably good, esp. considering it could have been a whole lot worse. And many people feel that if Pete had done these songs on a solo album and saved EG for the band, these songs would have been received with a whole lot more critical acclaim because of how personal and un-Wholike they are (though then they might very well have hated EG instead, which is really hypocritical). It was my ninth Who album, and I'll admit I was really disappointed to see it in the store instead of WBN or WAY, which I'd been hoping might finally be stocked there by then. However, I was well-grounded enough in my fandom to take a chance and buy this album I'd heard such awful things about from almost everyone, and having already been led to believe it was a piece of garbage, I was rather pleasantly surprised on my first listening. It will never be one of my fave Who albums, but I rather like most of the songs. Having already heard the worst, I was prepared for anything and didn't have any great expectations to be smashed, which is why I believe my reaction to it was not at all negative or disgusted. Most of the songs do have mediocre, lame, or embarrassing lyrics, but taken in context they're not bad and are even enjoyable (or, perhaps, as a younger fan, only a bit over a year old when the album was first released, I didn't come to it with all of the baggage that made so many older fans hate it so much).

My faves on this album are "YBYB" (which apparently more female than male fans like; most male fans seem to hate this song), "The Quiet One," "Don't Let Go the Coat" (which I took ages to appreciate; I hated it for the longest time, until the demo version on 'Another Scoop' grew on me), "Daily Records," and the original closer "Another Tricky Day," which is a classic early Eighties anthem. "Did You Steal My Money?" and "How Can You Do It Alone?" routinely top most peoples' lists of their most-hated Who songs, but I rather like them; the former is kinda cute, and the middle-eight is so poignant, and the latter song (which is like a grown-up version of "Pictures of Lily") I like because of the bagpipes.

The Who's later albums, from WBN on, really didn't have as much thought and care put into their bonus tracks as the earlier ones did, but this one is the exception. I don't really care for "I Like Nightmares," but the other four are spectacular. "It's in You" is a great rocker, and the live versions of "The Quiet One" and "HCYDIA?" also really cook. It's interesting to note the differences between the original live genesis of "HCYDIA?" and the blander and less directly dirty version that eventually made its way onto this album; the live genesis is not only harder and more rocking but also has raunchier lyrics. The inclusion of the group's version of Pete's solo song "Somebody Saved Me" is also a great bonus track. You can also spot the differences between this song and the later album version; on here it's very slow and soft, whereas on 'Chinese Eyes' it's faster and a bit harder. Overall a great remastering job on an album that most people don't think that highly of to begin with.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Underrated, March 25, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Face Dances (Audio CD)
Not a Who classic by any means but still has worthwhile music. Pete should not have divided time between the Who and his solo career at this point because it diluted his output. Nonetheless, there are some good songs on here as well as bonus tracks. Keith has been gone almost 20 years now and we still miss him.
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Face Dances
Face Dances by The Who
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