A Face Without A Heart and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $13.95
  • Save: $1.39 (10%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Eligible for FREE Super Saving Shipping! Fast Amazon shipping plus a hassle free return policy mean your satisfaction is guaranteed! Tracking number provided in your Amazon account with every order. Hardly used.
Add to Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

A Face Without A Heart: A Modern-day Version of Oscar Wilde's The Picture of Dorian Gray Paperback – July 23, 2006


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$12.56
$3.00 $1.27
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

New Adult Fiction by Rainbow Rowell
Acclaimed author Rainbow Rowell's latest book, Landline, offers a poignant, humorous look at relationships and marriage. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 196 pages
  • Publisher: Backinprint.com (July 23, 2006)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0595399169
  • ISBN-13: 978-0595399161
  • Product Dimensions: 0.4 x 5.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (19 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #4,365,736 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Rick R. Reed is the author of the novels Obsessed, Penance, and In the Blood. His short story collection, Twisted: Tales of Obsession and Terror was published in 2006. He lives in Chicago.

More About the Author

Rick R. Reed is all about exploring the romantic entanglements of gay men in contemporary, realistic settings. While his stories often contain elements of suspense, mystery and the paranormal, his focus ultimately returns to the power of love. He is the author of dozens of published novels, novellas, and short stories. He is a three-time EPIC eBook Award winner (for Caregiver, Orientation and The Blue Moon Cafe). Lambda Literary Review has called him, "a writer that doesn't disappoint." Rick lives in Seattle with his husband and a very spoiled Boston terrier. He is forever "at work on another novel."

Visit Rick's website at http://www.rickrreed.com or follow his blog at http://rickrreedreality.blogspot.com/. You can also like Rick on Facebook at www.facebook.com/rickrreedbooks or on Twitter at www.twitter.com/rickrreed. Rick always enjoys hearing from readers and answers all e-mails personally. Send him a message at jimmyfels@gmail.com

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
5 star
10
4 star
7
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
2
See all 19 customer reviews
This is a compelling novel with a solid story.
Tim Sauers
A lot has changed since Oscar Wilde penned the classic "Picture of Dorian Gray", but the heart of the story remains true.
Amazon Customer
When I did, I couldn't wait to continue the next segment.
Patrick Nadon

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Reader in Rochester on May 8, 2000
Format: Paperback
After buying this book based on the reader's reviews here, this reader was left disappointed.
I found that this book was not so much a statement on the times we live in as an excuse for flashy look-at-me-I-went-to-writing-school excesses.
The heaps of gratuitousness in this book did not impress me. Nor did the thin plot.
I would have much rather spent the time re-reading "The Picture of Dorian Gray".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Fred W. Hunter on June 13, 2002
Format: Paperback
Rick Reed has taken the basic plot of Oscar Wilde's "The Picture of Dorian Gray" and made it his own
The story follows Gary Adrion, an independently wealthy young man who is willingly pressed into posing for Liam Howard, an artist specializing in state-of-the-art holograms. The result is a three dimensional work of art that reflects both the beauty of the model, and the passion of the artist for his subject.
Awed by the hologram, Adrion rashly offers his soul in exchange for the ability to retain his physical beauty. Without realizing it (at first), his wish is granted: but he quickly discovers how high a price he has paid in the bargain. Devoid of his soul, Adrion finds himself robbed of the ability to experience either the pleasures or the ramifications of his actions. As a result, he embarks on an odyssey of sex, drugs and violence in a desperate attempt to feel something, remaining unscarred and unmoved while the hologram takes on the physical ugliness of his actions and the deterioration of his aging. The divorce of the man from the soul leads to a final act of violence and ultimate redemption.
Reed has transformed Wilde's prosaic story into a disturbing, searing indictment of our times, where moral ambivalence values beauty above substance. By choosing to present the story alternately through the eyes of several of the main characters (a device reminiscent of Bram Stoker's "Dracula"), Reed cleverly delivers the immediacy of a first person narrative, while allowing the reader insight in the characters' thoughts, feelings, and motivations: a privilege usually confined to a third person narrative. In other words, Reed has successfully managed to give the reader the best of both worlds.
His prose is alive with startling wordplay and haunting imagery.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Matt on October 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
I've read Rick R. Reed's other two novels, OBSESSED and PENANCE. Both pushed the envelope on sex and violence while providing non-stop, page-turning suspense. I was a little disappointed when I discovered that the author was updating a classic: Oscar Wilde's THE PICTURE OF DORIAN GRAY. I wasn't even sure I wanted to read the book, because I really liked Reed's first two gruesome, yet compelling novels. But Reed did it again with A FACE WITHOUT A HEART. The book is an amazingly quick read...can be gulped down easily in one sitting. Reed writes from the viewpoints of several different characters, among them a sassy drag queen who tells it like it is (modeled after Wilde's Lord Henry in the original). Reed's story, set in modern-day Chicago, is rife with drugs, sexual excess and heart-thudding violence, yet none of it is gratuitous. Reed brings out the homoerotic subtext of Wilde's original (that Wilde probably was unable to do in his day) and throws in a harrowing party scene that adds up to genuine horror. Reed's depiction of the underside of Chicago nightlife is frightening and it works, because it displays, with real accuracy, how nourishment of the physical can only result in malnutrition of the spirit. This is a solid novel and should be read by everyone who wonders what it would be like to stay young forever...hell, it should be read by anyone who appreciates a really good, keep you up at night, read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
I had always been loved Oscar Wilde's story, The Picture of Dorian Gray, having read it several times throughout my life, beginning in grade school. When I learned that Rick R. Reed had updated this classic, bringing it into present day, I was intrigued. After I started reading the novel, though, I was really surprised because Reed had managed to capture the essence of Wilde's plotting and wit, while adding his own spin to things. In some ways, I feel that this version has more resonance, because of our current proclivity to worship at the alters of youth and beauty. Reed's story, too, is much more explicit than Wilde could have been in his day, but I think that the moral and physical degeneration depicted in A Face Without a Heart makes for a much more compelling read. A Face Without a Heart is peopled with fascinating characters whom Reed places squarely on the Gold Coast/party circuit milieu of urban Chicago. I literally could not put this book down until I read the very last page. A wonderful achievement!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 10, 2000
Format: Paperback
A FACE WITHOUT A HEART is one of the best written and most compelling small press offerings I've seen in quite some time. If the plot is "thin" as one reviewer described it, then that would also make Wilde's "Dorian Gray" plot thin, as well, since both books have basically the same plot structure. Reed's writing is fresh, immediate and detailed. His plotting compels one to keep reading, without stopping, until the very last page. His novel is also more timely than Wilde's considering our times' fascination and obsession with youth and beauty. A stellar achievement!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search