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Facts About the Moon: Poems Paperback


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Facts About the Moon: Poems + The Book of Men: Poems + What We Carry (American Poets Continuum)
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 104 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (May 17, 2007)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393329623
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393329629
  • Product Dimensions: 8.2 x 5.5 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (8 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #749,039 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

Laux's fluent and likable first person shoots straight on sex, relationships and American adulthood in this substantial and unusually various fourth collection. The Oregon poet opens with a funny, compassionate political poem about urban mass transit, segues to "Vacation Sex" ("We've been at it all summer") and then to a meditation on the flag of Alaska, designed (as Laux explains) by a 13-year-old orphan 78 years ago. If she casts a wide net for subjects, Laux (Smoke) shows equal breadth with her free verse forms; the most accomplished tend to use long lines, and to digress, tersely and thoughtfully, from their narrative threads. Describing her marriage, her Western travels and her erotic history as girl and woman, Laux works in the idiom of Philip Levine and Sharon Olds, yet Laux's best verse is perhaps more surprising than theirs: if she occasionally sounds lugubrious, more often she makes "new cells pungent with the old codes." Laux has not invented a new style, but she has improved the one she has: "It took me years to grow a heart," Laux quips, "from paper and glue"; her verse certainly draws on it. (Nov.)
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Review

“To understand why her work is so widely read and admired, listen to the music Dorianne Laux makes, line after line....She is quick-witted and compassionate, with a genius for phrasing that never compromises the perfect clarity of her text....Continually engaging and, at her best, luminous.” (Steve Kowit - San Diego Union-Tribune)

More About the Author

Dorianne Laux's most recent collections are Facts about the Moon, recipient of the Oregon Book Award, and The Book of Men (W.W. Norton), winner of the Paterson Prize in Poetry, Laux is also author of Awake, What We Carry, and Smoke from BOA Editions, as well as Superman: The Chapbook, Dark Charms, and The Book of Women, all from Red Dragonfly Press. She co-edited The Poet's Companion: A Guide to the Pleasures of Writing Poetry (W.W. Norton). Recipient of many national grants and awards for her poetry, Laux teaches in the MFA Program at North Carolina State University and is founding faculty of Pacific University's Low Residency MFA Program in Oregon.

www/DorianneLaux.com
http://dlaux1.wordpress.com

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Luan Gaines HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 18, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Speaking with authority from the first page, this collection is accessible, familiar, the poet's trenchant observations sitting like pearls upon the tongue, not precious, but the flawed ones that are left behind.

Democracy requires open eyes and a willingness to suffer discomfort for its own sake, the burr of memory kept sharp:

"... the woman with her purse clutched

to her breasts like a dead child, the boy, pimpled, morose, his head

shorn, a swastika carved in the stubble,

staring you down...

"You can feel it now: why people become Republicans: Get that dog

off the street. Remove that spit and graffiti. Arrest those people huddled

on the steps of the church." (Democracy)

The title poem reflects upon the reality that the moon is receding from the earth an inch and a half each year, that one day in the distant future it will finally spiral out of orbit and "all land based life will die". The moon is our regulator, our constant companion, a mother we have treated badly, defied and scorned:

"... a mother

who's lost a child, a bad child,

a greedy child or maybe a grown boy

who's murdered and raped, a mother

can't help it, she loves that boy

anyway, and in spite of herself

she misses him...

... and you know she's only

romanticizing, that she's conveniently

forgotten the bruises and the booze...

and you want... to slap her back to sanity...

... and then, you can't help it

either, you know love when you see it,

you can feel its lunar strength, its brutal pull.
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7 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Peter Dragin on January 18, 2007
Format: Hardcover
Laux's voice is impeccably skillful in the American Grain. Her imagery dances nice as you please and her music is clean as a whistle. What's best here is her passionate commitment to and celebration of a healing process that entrusts poetics to the uncanny capacity of love to pull wholeness out of chaos and pain if only you stick with the quest. These poems encourage and nourish.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
My granddaughter, a poet, and I have a special connection with the moon. So this title seemed a perfect stocking stuffer, regardless of the content. I was not to worry. Great poems. Lovely transaction. All ended well!
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By atemp on December 12, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Dorianne Laux's book of poetry, Facts About the Moon is a serious and euphonic compilation of work. Throughout most of the book she uses short to middle length free verse. Most of her poems are at least two pages long and use a generous amount of enjambment. Some of my favorite poems include `The Lost," "Facts About the Moon," and "My Brother's Grave." Her poems some rarely take a sudden turn, but instead they often end up somewhere far from what I expected. For example, "Facts About the Moon" begins as the title states, but Laux gracefully begins incorporating the mother to child relationship in parallel to the moon and earth. "My Brother's Grave" begins by narrating a trip to her brother's grave and within the first ten lines, readers are able to see her loneliness, but it isn't explicitly stated by Laux until the few lines of the poem. The poem "The Lost" describes a rare type of love that is very interesting and intriguing, but also unrelatable.
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