Facts on the Ground and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.50
  • Save: $3.29 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Facts on the Ground: Arch... has been added to your Cart
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: Fast shipping from Amazon! Qualifies for Prime Shipping and FREE standard shipping for orders over $35. Overnight, 2 day and International shipping available! Excellent Customer Service.. May not include supplements such as CD, access code or DVD.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $2.00
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society Paperback – February 1, 2002

ISBN-13: 978-0226001951 ISBN-10: 0226001954 Edition: 1st

Buy New
Price: $24.21
29 New from $19.99 27 Used from $8.75
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$24.21
$19.99 $8.75
Free Two-Day Shipping for College Students with Amazon Student Free%20Two-Day%20Shipping%20for%20College%20Students%20with%20Amazon%20Student


The Conservatarian Manifesto by Charles C.W. Cooke
The Conservatarian Manifesto by Charles C.W. Cooke
Enjoy this well written applaud to conservatarianism. Learn more | See related books
$24.21 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society + Orientalism
Price for both: $35.38

Buy the selected items together

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Al-Haj's analysis of the political nature of archaeological practice is an incisive, penetrating, and persuasive discussion of how the past has been instrumental in the shaping of modern Israeli identity."
(Antiquity) --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From the Inside Flap

In this incisive book, Nadia Abu El-Haj demonstrates the role that archaeology has played in Israeli society, examining how it emerged as a pervasive force that has shaped the region's social and political imaginations and has inspired violently contested territorial and national-cultural struggles. Based on archival research and ethnographic work among archaeologists, tour guides, and politicians, she presents the first critical account of Israeli archaeological practice while tracing the dynamic relationships among science, colonization, nation-state building, and territorial expansion.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Gold Box Deal of the Day: Up to 80% Off Fiction Favorites
Today only, more than 15 fiction favorites are up to 80% off on Kindle. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 363 pages
  • Publisher: University of Chicago Press; 1 edition (February 1, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0226001954
  • ISBN-13: 978-0226001951
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.9 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (16 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #402,022 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

3.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

54 of 68 people found the following review helpful By H. Minadeo on September 3, 2007
Format: Paperback
As an avid amateur archeologist, I read this book to gain insight into the current situation of unearthing the past in Palestine. The author presented several intriguing ideas, such as the desire of immigrants who never had any contact with this "new-old land" to establish a legitimacy entitling them to be part of the region. Such insights as the naming of Tel Aviv (from Arabic words for "mound" and "spring") and the excavations of the Temple site shed light on the process of the creation of the myth of a new nation. Indeed, the immigrants, mainly from Central and Eastern Europe, had been schooled in the process of using the past to justify their nationhood. I highly recommend this text for anyone interested in a new and daring view of the material. There are some critics who have launched a campaign to discredit the author because of her temerity in analyzing most objectively the politics of mythification via archeology. No one should be discouraged from reading "Facts on the Ground" by such obvious would-be-silencers of what they consider to be a taboo topic.
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
44 of 56 people found the following review helpful By Janet C. on September 12, 2007
Format: Paperback
The politicization of archaeology--like every other discipline--is not new and El-Haj makes a thoroughly professional and expert comment on the political uses and abuses of Israeli archaeology. Highly recommended!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
62 of 82 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 15, 2007
Format: Paperback
Recovered Roots: Collective Memory and the Making of Israeli National Tradition by Yael Zerubavel discusses the construction of memory and the invention of traditions in Mandatory Palestine and in the State of Israel. The book describes some unusual Israeli or Zionist practices associated with Masada and Bar Kochba archeological excavations.

Rather like Nadia Abu el Haj in Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society, Zerubavel describes the use of archeology and other scholarship to construct Zionist national identity.

Other scholars have investigated the political use of archeology in various contexts. Not only Max Weinreich and Eric Hobsbawm provide similar analysis in their published works, but Constructing "Korean" Origins: A Critical Review of Archaeology, Historiography, and Racial Myth in Korean State Formation Theories by Hyung Il Pai addresses precisely that same issues with regard to the development of Korean national consciousness.

Even though Abu el Haj focuses more narrowly on professional archeologists whereas Zerubavel looks at Israeli society as a whole, both authors make similar points in their books, and Zerubavel provides support for some of the claims for which Nadia Abu el Haj has been most criticized.

Zerubavel received the 1996 Salo Baron Prize of the American Academy for Jewish Research for her work while Nadia Abu el Haj is the target of an international campaign to drive her out of Columbia/Barnard. The difference in the responses evoked by the two authors merits a scholarly study in itself.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Dahveed on April 29, 2008
Format: Paperback
Scholarly, unbiased, thoughtful argument touching on a highly explosive, emotionally charged issue, nationhood. Insightful and courageous thinking. Explores how groups come to define themselves and suggests how distinctions and divisions among "tribes" of humans are created and promoted. Very interesting!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
78 of 109 people found the following review helpful By vtc1 on April 1, 2003
Format: Paperback
El-Haj's thesis is on the mark. The ways in which nation states reformulate their own archaeological record and national landscape to generate a primordial national identity is a process we can observe in many parts of the planet. The fact that she examines Israel where the current political climate is tense to say the least, makes her an easy target for writers who instinctually back Israel and support outsiders' "imperial"
interests in the region.
The previous critique (below) seems critical of Anthropology as an entire discipline. The writer is correct to point out that El-Haj is indebted to Anderson, Said and even Thomas Kuhn, but I am not quite sure why this is damning, as these writers are in many ways foundational to the very study of anthropology and history of science--they question inherent power structures in state, labor class and scientific institutions and dissect how power structures mask and reformulate what we percieve to be "Truth".
Anthropology is certainly well suited to "building and interpreting social and intellectual history" as the previous critic claims it is not. This is called historical anthropology and is well-outlined in the "Journal of Ethnohistory" published out of Wisconsin.
Admittedly, 'Facts on the Ground' could be written better, and towards the middle of the book you feel like throwing it down because El-Haj repeats herself for the length of about three chapters. There is a feeling that the book was meant to be a journal article that was expanded into a full length book in pursuit of a tenure track position.
But, most importantly, her content is on track. I recommend this book for those interested in the present Israel/Palestine conflict and are looking to search various sources (and biases) on the matter.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Brian Kenneth Swain on January 27, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Finally got through this after many months of stopping and starting. It's quite tough and pretty dense in parts, being essentially a doctoral dissertation converted into book form. It is also extremely challenging to rank this work from a purely literary or even societal perspective, since the topic is so fraught with politics. El Haj is essentially making the case that Israeli archaeologists have systematically used their science as a means not so much of advancing the field as of fabricating a foundation for the history and present right to exist of the Jewish state. Needless to say, many are not comfortable with this assertion or the arguments she makes to support it. In fact, if you look at all of the other ratings on Amazon, what you find is a pretty much equal number of 1's (pro-Israelis who can't stand anything negative being said about Israel or Judaism) and 5's (pro-Arabs who think that anything that undermines Israel is just swell). All this said, it is certainly a thought provoking work and one that raises numerous valid issues to think about, irrespective of your politics or views on Middle-East affairs.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society
This item: Facts on the Ground: Archaeological Practice and Territorial Self-Fashioning in Israeli Society
Price: $27.50 $24.21
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com