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Fade to Black (Shadowrun 13) (v. 13) Mass Market Paperback – January 1, 1995


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Product Details

  • Mass Market Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Roc; First Printing edition (April 1, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0451452879
  • ISBN-13: 978-0451452870
  • Product Dimensions: 7 x 1 x 5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 0.8 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,188,373 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 1, 1999
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Absolutely the finest of FASA's Shadowrun fiction, this one has it all. No BS game-speak, a killer plot, believeable (if not exactly likeable) characters. Great setting as well, expecially for the overall texture and subculture; Smith's Newark is a character in and of itself. Compared to earlier SR novels (including Smith's Striper Assassin), this was the first that impressed me as a viable story outside of the SR mythos; FTB can stand on its own in the sci-fi/cyberpunk genre. I recommend this book to all new players of the game, as an intro to a non-comic book version of the SR world. I was particularly impressed by the lack of plot devices; the story isn't some cutesy mystery or heroic fantasy with a pat ending. It reminded me somewhat of Ellroy's books. I also recommend Smith's "Who Hunts the Hunter" and "Steel Rain". A must-read for all non-munchkin Shadowrunners and GMs; this book makes the GM screen's characters come to life (heh heh).
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 18, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I've read several of the books in the Shadowrun line and this one is my favourite to date. It is one of the few shadowrun books that gives a decent portrayal of shadowrunners and shadowrunning as described in the game. It does an excellent job of capturing the atmosphere of the world, and gets heavy into the nuances of the etiquette and wheeling and dealing a shadowrunner must go through to survive. If you are new to the game and want to get some tips for roleplaying shadowrunners this is the book to read. It is also an excellent source of inspiration for the GM. There are no grand sweeping, save the world sort of plots in this book, just good old fashion shadowrunning as it should be.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
Nyx Smith is, IMO, the worst author in the Shadowrun expanded universe. This book is one of the better novels he released, but that's a compliment in the same way "this cockroach is more tasty than the rest of them" is an endorsement. Smith is notorious in the SR community for having over-the top Mary-Sue protagonists, and this book is no exception. At least, that seems to be the case. It's hard to tell because half of the damn book is Smith introducing new characters one on top of the other until it legitimately becomes a "wait, who now?" situation in the beginning of every chapter. The glut of excessive characters, mixed with the absolutely glacial pace with which the story unfolds, makes this book incredibly tedious to read.

Even the etiquette, which is usually what is praised about this novel, felt stilted. Not to give too heavily a spoiler, there's a moment where the protagonist outright threatens and gets into a physical confrontation in a Yakuza club. With the guy hiring him, and his bodyguard. Not only did Smith take *deliberate* care to point out how much the Yaks don't stand for this kind of behavior, it also stretches belief to the point of injury for the reader to expect ANYONE to take a life or death job from someone they just had a near fatal standoff with. Rule number one of running the shadows is the facade of respect, and it seems every single character in this entire novel exists to try to out-amazing one another. Tedious, at best.

I'm not even going to get into the rampant and all-pervasive sexism, which it seems Smith is convinced is a hallmark of the SR universe. I'm no social justice warrior, but the level of misogyny in this book is literally cringe-inducing.
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