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Fading Faith: The Rise of the Secular Age Paperback – September 15, 2010


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 167 pages
  • Publisher: Gustav Broukal Press; First edition (September 15, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1578840090
  • ISBN-13: 978-1578840090
  • Product Dimensions: 0.5 x 5.3 x 8.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (18 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,947,897 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

FADING FAITH chronicles the decline of faith world-wide as well as in America and predicts that America is traveling the same path to secularism that has been traveled by all the other developed nations of the world. A historic transition is occurring, barely noticed. Slowly, imperceptibly, religion is shriveling. Pope Benedict XVI laments that ''Europe has developed a culture that, in a manner unknown before now to humanity, excludes God from the public conscience.'' In Denmark and Sweden, fewer than 5% of adults are in church on a typical Sunday. Although over half of British children attended Sunday school in 1900, by 2000 the rate was down to 4%. In America, despite the superficial success of the noisier religious groups, surveys since 1990 have shown that the godless fraction of Americans had doubled from 1/10th to 1/5th of the adult population. Around 45 million Americans live apart from churchgoing. --Editor, Gustav Broukal Press

About the Author

Editor of the Charleston Gazette (WV) newspaper, James A. Haught has won 20 national news-writing awards and is the author of 9 books. Born in a tiny WV farm town that lacked paved streets and electricity, he graduated from high school in a class of 13 and made his way to the state capital where he became a newspaper man. He is listed in Who's Who in America and Contemporary Authors.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By John Sparks on January 3, 2012
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On the basis of the comments of the editor at Gustav Broukal Press, listed on this book's webpage at Amazon.com, I bought it expecting to receive a scholarly or at least a semi-scholarly examination of the rise of secularism in American culture. And it is true that the lead and end essays in the book give brief treatments of some aspects of this phenomenon. However, this particular theme only concerns two essays in what is actually a collection of reprints of articles written by the author for such periodicals as Free Inquiry, American Atheist, Secular Humanist Bulletin, and even the Charleston (WV) Gazette, which the author served for many years as editor. Also included are transcripts of one or two talks given by the author to sundry gatherings of the Unitarian Universalist Church (to which he belongs) in Charleston. The only thing the pieces truly have in common are a general pro-freethought slant, rather than the single theme of rising secularism, though I must say it's refreshing to discover an Appalachian Mountain freethinker. Would that I'd've come across his writing years ago; it's sort of ironic that I haven't, since he only lives about a hundred miles from me.

Now that said, not only would I love to see another book from this author concentrating in more specific detail on the rise of secularism, but one more, the subject of which is merely treated all too briefly in one essay entitled "Agog Over Gog and Magog" (pp. 55-57). It concerns a claim made by former President George W. Bush to French President Jacques Chirac in early 2003: that "Iraq must be invaded to thwart Gog and Magog, the Bible's satanic agents of the Apocalypse.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Faye Whitaker on August 1, 2013
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Too many opinions (personal or otherwise) presented as facts. Not enough depth in research. Doesn't appear to be evenly balanced.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Vickie Woodard on July 4, 2013
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I will start by telling the truth- i couldn't finish this book. I was one set one set of Statistics after another.
The author began in Europe, comparing church attendance figures from the early 1900's to the early 2000's. If the man had been discussing population figures, our friends in Europe would have to own helicopters to visit their nearest neighbors. He spoke of the negative population growth in Italy, a Roman Catholic country. And of a Scandanavian poll that proved secular people were happier than religious people. People in Great Britain still admired Jesus Christ, but they admired Brittany Spears six times as much and Nelson Mandela several dozen times as much.
Then he turned to the mega-churches of the U.S.A.; I consider them more showmanship than soulmanship. STILL with one statistic after another! The most important point he made was that while we in the U.S. have remained more faithful to our churches, our country has one of the highest per capita murder rates in the world.
We aren't listening very well.
The other thing that made this book impossible for me to read without getting a headache was the bold print the author used on every word. I tried adjusting print size, but unfortunately I couldn't adjust print thickness.
Yes, I meant to score this book no stars. The bold print is like sitting through a lecture and being screamed at; the constant statistics give you no time to process the information.
Well, I meant to score it no stars, but the computer won't accept the review until it has a star.
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9 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Texas Reader on November 4, 2010
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This is a well-researched book by a talented author. Haught is the editor of the Charleston Gazette in West Virginia. He takes an in-depth look into the way religious faith is slowly fading in the United States, being replaced by secularization. Great read.
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By j.carter on June 14, 2014
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I found Haught's book to be quite well written. The points were clearly made and easily understood. Since early childhood I have held many questions about religious teaching and this book rand true for me.
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One of the best books I have read. Loaded with facts to support the author's book. I can see transition happening away from religion and all its problems and the author confirms it with his facts. Good read for all. Lessons to the religious right too
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This is one of the better books about the secularization trend worldwide, and the fact that as people become more knowledgeable in the areas of science and logic, there is an apparently irreversible replacement of superstition and pseudoscience going on in the 21st-century.

The author does not, of course, try to make converts of those who are devoutly religious, but offers a worthwhile alternative to consider if you have an open mind. As with all books on secular humanism and kindred studies, if your entire life revolves around your religious beliefs, you may choose not to read this. It presents certain challenging questions which may be in contradiction to the dearly held beliefs of whatever particular religion with which you align.

With this caveat firmly in mind, I would highly recommend this book to the freethinking people out there who might enjoy a look at the secularization trend in the US and worldwide.
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