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Comment: Good used copy with minimal signs of use and wear. NOT ex library; Binding is Good; Pages are Clean with some dog eared pages; Covers are in Good condition with some reading wear but no rips or tears**PRIME ELIGIBLE**FULFILLED BY AMAZON**
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Fado Alexandrino (Antunes, Antonio Lobo) Paperback – August 21, 1995


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Product Details

  • Series: Antunes, Antonio Lobo
  • Paperback: 497 pages
  • Publisher: Grove Press; Reprint edition (August 21, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802134211
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802134219
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,327,268 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The Portuguese author of Elephant Memory and South of Nowhere makes no concessions to the reader in this dense and demanding work. Hundreds of pages elapse before settings, characters and events are explicitly identified; instead, the narrative progresses with Antunes recreating the thought processes of his four protagonists, who meet in their native Lisbon approximately 10 years after they have served a tour of duty in colonial Mozambique in 1970. The men reflect on their experiences there, on a subsequent revolution at home and on their personal histories as they spend a night in the company of five prostitutes--a night of revelations that ends in murder. Although Antunes, a practicing psychoanalyst, displays brilliance in the fluidity of his stream-of-consciousness and the complexity of his imagery (a stranger stares "with the distant distraction of corpses at wakes, their smiles softened into the amiable indifference of portraiture"), the elusiveness of the plot will frustrate and bewilder most readers.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Between 1960 and 1974 tiny but once mighty Portugal sent a million and a half troops to preserve its empire in Angola, where men--scapegoats for the politicians back home--became machine gun-clutching animals in Vietnam-like conditions. Ten years after the coup to overthrow the Portuguese dictatorship and the withdrawal of troops from the African country, four ex-soldiers gather over dinner and wine to confess to one another their respective brutalities, which naturally lead to their present-day brutalities at home. Like the author's highly acclaimed autobiographical novel South from Nowhere ( LJ 5/15/83), in which an Army surgeon relives his 1,001 days in the Angolan hell, this longer and more particularized novel unfolds on many levels, and its quadruple confession leaves no doubt about the decadence and corruption of contemporary Lisbon. Recommended.
- Jack Shreve, Allegany Community Coll. , Cumberland, Md.
Copyright 1990 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

4.9 out of 5 stars
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It demands close attention, it demands patience, and you have to like the flow of language.
Bob Newman
Beautiful, morbid, complex, difficult, structurally amazing and intricately detailed, Fado Alexandrino is well worth the effort.
Damian Kelleher
If you are patient, you will eventually identify and identify with the characters and the events they are describing.
Dick Johnson

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

26 of 26 people found the following review helpful By tom.palmer@bradford.gov.uk on February 18, 1999
Format: Paperback
Secker published a couple of Antunes' books in the UK in the late eighties, but then they dropped him. On a trip to the US I found Fado Alexandrino. I was astonished. It is rare that you come across an experimental novel which is a page turner too. It is the story of a handful of army vets who have a reunion. The narrative weaves from one man's disturbed thoughts to the next man's. This creates a confusion in who is speaking, but - like I say - this is not off putting: it adds to the effect of the novel. The book looks daunting, but I unreservedly recommend it. It is moving. It is well written. It is thought provoking. Antunes is a devastating writer.
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9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Damian Kelleher on January 6, 2005
Format: Paperback
Late one night in Lisbon, Portugal, five army men are reunited on the tenth anniversary of their battalion's return from Mozambique. Since the horror of Africa, some of the men have been promoted, some divorced, married, remarried, demoted, fired, started a business, looked after family members, buried family members. They discuss their lives over wine, tongues loosening as the alcohol flows. In a few hours, one of the men will be dead, murdered, stabbed in the back by one of the other soldiers.

To boil down the plot to its very essence, the above paragraph encapsulates Fado Alexandrino. But this sprawling, extravagant, difficult novel covers so much more with every one of its nearly five hundred pages. The impact of this novel is not what is said, but how it is said, the way Antunes manages to weave five very different lives together into a coherent whole, spanning more than a decade of time.

Antunes uses an interesting style of extremely long paragraphs, broken up by the very rare period, but littered with commas. In one paragraph - this is not rare - a character will begin thinking about something, his thoughts triggered by an off-hand comment, and his mind will wander back to five years ago, or ten, or yesterday, and the focus of the paragraph will switch to this new scene, with new characters, without changing tense, staying in the 'present', and then another character will begin thinking, and they will take over the scene, they will direct the paragraph to another place and time, they will be the focus.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Dick Johnson VINE VOICE on January 26, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I just re-read the Amazon description: dense and demanding. That's an understatement! I really enjoy Portuguese and Latin American literature (you know a "but" is coming), BUT why, why, why do the writers not want you to get to know who the characters are until page 17,348? It isn't that the characters aren't important to the story - they ARE the story.

Each of these should come with a disclaimer: "WARNING: you may never know who the characters are or what they are talking about. This is not a fault of your brain or the printer. It is doubtful it is part of a plot to take over the world since they wouldn't know who to put in charge or where to find them if they did. Read at your own risk." Don't be surprised if the warning is written by the author.

If you are patient, you will eventually identify and identify with the characters and the events they are describing. Once you get to that point, the flow of the story will change for you and what went before will be clearer (you'll never be totally clear - Antunes probably planned it that way).

This is one of those books being referred to when you hear "it has to be experienced".
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Bob Newman VINE VOICE on May 2, 2006
Format: Paperback
Drowning in words that crash, rumble, streak past, drip down through the cracks in the ceiling, swell up from the pages and invade my brain, stumble, drop, fall, plunge from every page, topple my usual sense of books, I made it through FADO ALEXANDRINO to the very end, sometimes wondering why I was subjecting myself to such a difficult novel, sometimes rejoicing that I'd heard of it by chance many years ago. Lobo Antunes, whose other works I don't know, has written a nearly-500 page masterpiece which definitely is not for everyone. It demands close attention, it demands patience, and you have to like the flow of language. That this is the case even in English is a tribute to the famous translator Gregory Rabassa, who almost single-handedly, brilliantly, has brought Portuguese-language literature to English readers. Five men gather in the 1980s in a bar. They served together in Mozambique around 1970, fighting in one of Salazarist Portugal's colonial wars. The novel covers their return to Lisbon, the resumption or crumbling of their previous lives, and then the onset of the bloodless Portuguese revolution of April 25, 1974. One man never speaks, but we feel his presence. There's a soldier, become a furniture mover for his uncle's tottering business. There's a second lieutenant from a humble background, married into a rich family who flee to Brazil when the Revolution occurs. Third is a lieutenant colonel whose wife dies just as he returns from Africa and who takes up with "a cloud of perfume" in silver high heels and oyster-colored eyelids. Fourth is a communications officer (also referred to as "Lieutenant" which caused me no end of confusion at first) an underground Communist agitator, jailed for his pains before being freed after April 25th.Read more ›
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