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Faery Wicca, Book 1: Theory and Magick, a Book of Shadows and Lights (The Ancient Oral Faery Tradition of Ireland) (Bk.1) Paperback – August 8, 1998


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About the Author

Kisma K. Stepanich was born July 4, 1958, in Southern California. She has been actively involved in the Goddess community since the early 1980s. Kisma founded Women Spirit Rising of Costa Mesa, a woman's organization that provides ongoing New and Full Moon ceremonies, monthly Goddess mythology circles, seasonal celebrations and women's spirituality workshops. Of Irish and Romanian descent, Kisma Proudly claims her European heritage. Having studied and undergone initiation in the Celtic and Faery traditions, she turned her focus to the native traditions of America and has studied and undergone initiation with several Shamans of Native American traditions. Kisma works toward integrating all indigenous traditions and worldwide Goddess cultures into one unified Earth tradition which she calls the Gaia Tradition.
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Llewellyn Publications; 1st edition (August 8, 1998)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1567186947
  • ISBN-13: 978-1567186949
  • Product Dimensions: 1 x 7.2 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (64 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #426,968 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

23 of 25 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 6, 1997
Format: Paperback
The only positive thing that one can say about this book is that it is slightly better than the 21 Lessons of Merlin, by Douglas Monroe.

What factual information there is has been buried under nonsense and a poorly disguised veil of Wicca. Please, people, spend money on real materials on the Irish indigenous traditions of filidecht (poet-craft) and folklore rather than wasting time on this.

It is fascinating that Kisma can claim to have been an Ollamh (highest level of poet-singer) in the middle 1980's, as the rank of Ollamh required between 12 and 21 years of study under an Ollamh.
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51 of 60 people found the following review helpful By Laurel Jenkins-Crowe on April 19, 2003
Format: Paperback
It's deeply disheartening to see that this woman continues to attract so many fans. While many other reviewers have pointed out Stepanich's rampant inaccurancies and tendancy to just plain make stuff up ("ancient Irish potato goddess" indeed!), nobody seems to have touched on the blatant plagiarism that led to certain of her books being yanked out of print.
She has no respect for accuracy or even the intellectual property of other authors. She certainly has no respect for her students, or she would not teach them such utter trash. Entire web pages have been devoted to debunking her, and I suggest readers look up a couple of these before they waste their money--and time, as anything you "learn" from Ms. Stepanich will have to be unlearned later.
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40 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Lindsey Anne on June 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
I give this book one star simply because the illustrations are lovely. I've never seen the artist's work before, but I'm very impressed.
That said, both of Kisma's 'Faery Wicca' books are pure trash. It's sad that people actually believe that Kisma is revealing an ancient tradition. I'm sorry to ruin anyone's happy little fantasy, but she is not. The ancient Irish did not practice something that is suspiciously similar to Wicca. The fact that Kisma has somehow convinced many people that they did is lamentable.
Ignoring her lack of historical fact, as a book about a spiritual path, it fails. There is not much mention of the Tuatha de Danaan, whom Kisma claims are ever so important. The only real rituals offered are four rather short, rather uninspiring holy day rituals. I'm confused as to why she spends so much time focusing on things such as "the four elementals" <which, SURPRISE!, are not Celtic at all> and not on her gods.
I can't help but laugh at the reviews here, where people suspect that Kisma's books have been given bad reviews because people are "angry" that she "exposed their secrets". Honeys, end your fantasies. Kisma and her group are the only ones who have practiced this stuff. It is NOT ancient. I can't repeat that enough.
Even wit the bad history, this book might have been an okay guide to a more Celtic <notice that I did not say A CELTIC> form of Wicca, if Kisma just admitted that this stuff wasn't ancient and was just a Celticization of Wicca. Sadly, she doesn't do this.
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22 of 26 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 3, 2002
Format: Paperback
The orginal faith is not Wiccan. If you would like to read the true information on this faith try Exans-wentz, Caitlin Matthews or RJ Stewart. Deserves a -5
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Morgan Daimler on August 12, 2008
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I'd have given it 0 stars if that was an option, it's not even worth the money to buy used. Her information is so inaccurate it makes me wonder if she read half the sources she lists in her bibliography. She relies on several authors which have been largely discredited, such as R A S MacAlister whose theories on Ogham being thousands of years old are baseless, or Seamus McManus's archeologically inaccurate idea that the Fomorians were Scythian or the Fir Bolg Greek. Beyond the shaky references, there are the accusations of plagerism covered in other reviews, as well as the author's rampant self contradictions - in one section she states that Cu Chulainn is Lugh reincarnated then two paragraphs later refers to Lugh coming to Cu Chulainn's aid, without ever explaining how that could be possible if they were the same person. She also inaccurately refers to the Fianna as members of the Tuatha de Danann. Her text is full of Kabbalistic references which have no place in the fairy faith. And for someone claiming the title of Ollamh - the highest rank among the Fili, or poets of Ireland - her Irish Gaelic is atrocious. She mangles the language mercilessly, both in spelling and her pronounciation guide reducing it to meaningless gibberish, making it very plain that she does not speak the language at all - it seems to be included for no other reason than to make her book look more "Irish" and authentic, when it is in fact neither. Anyone who reads this at the least needs to be aware that it is not genuinely Irish in any way, and should skip right over any Irish Gaelic included in the text. The information about the gods and faeries is blatantly wrong and often contradictory. In short I would never recommend this book as it only spreads a lot of misinformation.Read more ›
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 17, 1997
Format: Paperback
This is a sweet, large-type, teen-age book. It does not deal with the hard-core issues of the magical traditions. If you are in need of some soul searching quiet time, the meditations contained within are just right. It will pinch your intrest in finding out more about the traditions of the faery, yet it lacks a firm grounding in truth and the art of magick
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