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Failing At Fairness: How Our Schools Cheat Girls Paperback – March 1, 1995


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Failing At Fairness: How Our Schools Cheat Girls + Still Failing at Fairness: How Gender Bias Cheats Girls and Boys in School and What We Can Do About It + Kwanzaa and Me: A Teacher's Story
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 368 pages
  • Publisher: Scribner; 1st Touchstone Edition, 1995 edition (March 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068480073X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0684800738
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #984,138 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The authors look at considerable evidence of gender inequities in the classroom and suggest ways to reform the education system. QPB alternate selection.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

Garin Rubenstein The New York Times Required reading for anyone interested in sex bias.

Patricia Ireland President, National Organization for Women Provides hard evidence of the discrimination women face from the first day of school.

Naomi Wolf Author of The Beauty Myth We need many more books like this one, that draw into the foreground the fact that sexism in the schools is crippling America's leadership and productivity.

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Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

13 of 16 people found the following review helpful By PORTEREL@SHU.EDU Elizabeth M. Porter on September 1, 1999
Format: Paperback
For every woman who ever sat in a classroom and was afraid to raise her hand, hunched her shoulders, or found a strength in finally speaking out. For their mothers, fathers, brothers, sisters, husbands and children. Contrary to the negative reviews of this book, Orenstein is not attempting to 'blame the system', but to improve it and make girls and women more aware of how they themselves can get 'more for their money', per say, from the school system. Read this book if you even KNOW a girl.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 12, 1996
Format: Paperback
This book is a meticulous documentation of how our educational system discriminates against girls. An illuminating example is how boys get called on more, even by conscientious teachers who both want to overcome this problem and know they are being observed
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 30, 1999
Format: Paperback
In addition to being a well-researched text, Failing at Fairness provides important antedotal evidence on girls' experience in school. I find it amusing that the two negative reviews here either contain substantive grammatical errors (lol) or criticize the authors for using girls' actual experiences -- hello -- social and cultural history provide very acceptable and important insights into human behavior. This text is a "must read" for educators and parents.
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9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By "gsibbery" on May 31, 2000
Format: Paperback
This book should be required reading for all teachers and educators of every sort. A very detailed view of how schools cheat girls by marginialising their roles in the classrooms of America. What makes this book so good, however, is that there are some potential solutions available; that is not to say that this book really has THE answers, but it is a step in the right direction. The statistics regarding the prefromance of females at all-girl schools are impressive, and may be of importance, since co-ed instituions often seem to neglect girls to a greater degree, but this only seems a temporary solution, as the workforce itself is co-ed, and females must get used to operating in such environments. The main thing that is necessary is for the educators to get educated themselves in what is going on; it seems all too likely that the most of the teachers who are doing these things are not even aware of it. If useful strategies are taught to future teachers as to how to combat gender bias, schools in the future may be a great deal fairer of their treatment of all students.
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 25, 1999
Format: Paperback
This book has really opened the eyes of many parents and teachers on our planning committee. The more we investigated the issues raised, the more validity we discovered. And most of all, even from the "good" teachers who thought they were doing a great job. We have had lots of spin-off research as a result of this wonderful resource.
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By S. Bell on February 26, 2000
Format: Paperback
I found this book to be quite enlightening in the sense that many do not want to recognize the social injustices that have plagued our society and ignored women's achievements throughout history. Not unlike the achievement gap that exists between poor and minority students and their more priveleged counterparts, it is crucial to address and evaluate the institutional barriers that exist within many school cultures today. Students who are disadvantaged because of biases that impede their emotional, career, and academic development in school and in their life deserve the additional support and attention that will allow them to reach the goals that were once not meant for them. Sadker and Sadker have done an excellent job in demonstrating another facet of accountability that teachers must embrace-that of demonstrating and practicing gender equity in the classroom.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Patricia A. Powell on October 23, 2000
Format: Paperback
"Failing at Fairness" is a landmark book in the education of girls. Researchers Myra and David Sadker step away from the fuzzy assumptions we have about gender and concentrate on facts and specific behavior.
The book is strongest on presenting the history of educating women, and defining specifically how girls are still getting shortchanged. The authors clearly lay out their analysis of what is wrong with girl's education. The weakness of the book is in the last chapter "The Edge of Change". The solution to any problem requires change, and this change requires a rethink of how we treat half the population. It challenges our habits, our culture, our intellect and our pocketbook. And , unfortunately, the Sadkers are a little light and fuzzy when suggesting solutions. This is forgivable given the scope of the problem.
If you are a parent of a girl, or if you are or want to be a good teacher, I encourage you to read Failing at Fairness.
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By Heather M. Pond on July 28, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought this as a requirement for a graduate class. I really enjoyed how both the authors examined many aspect of education and how they affect females.
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