Slings and Arrows 3 Seasons 2005

Amazon Instant Video

Season 2
(53) IMDb 8.6/10
Available in HD

4. Fair is Foul and Foul is Fair TV-MA

With subscribers canceling en masse since the launch of From Hammer's campaign of alienation, Sanjay counsels Richard to embrace the left side of his brain. Now living in a storage room in the theatre with Oliver's ghost as a roommate, Geoffrey reaches a breaking point with his Macbeth.

Runtime:
47 minutes
Original air date:
July 18, 2005

Available in HD on supported devices.

Fair is Foul and Foul is Fair

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Season 2
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    1. Season's End Geoffrey gets a permanent posting as the New Burbage artistic director after his triumphant Hamlet, but major challenges loom ahead. Richard, the CEO, must keep the festival from going broke, and Geoffrey must stage the cursed Scottish tragedy, Macbeth.

    TV-MA 47min June 27, 2005
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    2. Fallow Time Christmas comes to New Burbage and so do the interns, who are part of the new austerity program. Richard raises begging to new heights and hires Sanjay Ranier of the hip and edgy marketing firm Frog Hammer.

    TV-MA 47min July 4, 2005
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    3. Rarer Monsters The curse of Macbeth kicks in when the director of Romeo and Juliet breaks her neck, forcing Geoffrey to invite show-dog Darren Nichols back from Berlin to fill in. Juliet meets her Romeo and sparks do not fly. Ellen and Geoffrey's brief experiment in domesticity ends. Badly.

    TV-MA 47min July 11, 2005
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    4. Fair is Foul and Foul is Fair With subscribers canceling en masse since the launch of From Hammer's campaign of alienation, Sanjay counsels Richard to embrace the left side of his brain. Now living in a storage room in the theatre with Oliver's ghost as a roommate, Geoffrey reaches a breaking point with his Macbeth.

    TV-MA 47min July 18, 2005
  • from $1.99

    5. Steeped in Blood Ellen confuses her auditor with a confessor but graduates to adulthood with the final tally of her back taxes. The police have developed a keen interest in Sanjay, whose real name is not Sanjay. With the veteran actor playing Macbeth dismissed for having a bloated ego, his understudy preps for the spotliglight.

    TV-MA 48min July 25, 2005
  • from $1.99

    6. Birnam Wood Youthquake--the magic of rebranding kicks in! Geoffrey works on his own brand of explosive magic, Oliver returns to the stage, Richard upgrades his dream quest to include Gilbert & Sullivan, and love conquers all.

    TV-MA 48min August 1, 2005

Product Details

Genres Comedy
Director Peter Wellington
Supporting actors Paul Gross, Susan Coyne, David Alpay, Maja Ardal, Joanne Boland, Ben Carlson, Jonathan Crombie, Oliver Dennis, Colm Feore, Joanne Kelly, Grace Lynn Kung, Roy Lewis, Don McKellar, Mark McKinney, Leon Pownall, John Stead, Jacob Tierney, Geraint Wyn Davies
Season year 2005
Network Rhombus Media Inc.
Executive Producer Niv Fichman
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By K. Harris HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWER on September 26, 2006
Format: DVD
If anyone had told me a year ago that my favorite program on television would be a Canadian import about a Shakespearean theater troupe, I would have had my doubts. But Season 1 of "Slings and Arrows" beguiled me. So droll and sophisticated, but with moments of sheer slapstick, I was absolutely enchanted. The writing was so smart, so funny, the performances spot on--including Paul Gross and Rachel McAdams (two of the more familiar actors for American audiences). It ended in six episodes and I wistfully said good-bye to a near brilliant show. I had no idea there was more to come.

So I was delighted when I heard Season 2 was on it's way. But I was also doubtful. Could they really mine the same material and come up with another winner? To my mind, they did that and even more. I enjoyed it every bit as much.

This season there was less back story, so it dealt more specifically about the inner workings of actually staging a couple of shows. The misadventures of producing the cursed "MacBeth" is definitely the highpoint. It might have been the funniest thing on TV last season, seriously. Add subplots about theater ingenues in "Romeo and Juliet" (McAdams says farewell in episode 1, so there's a new ingenue), a romance found/lost/found, and plenty of wit--and you have a delight. One subplot about an experimental advertising campaign to lure new traffic to the theater festival is perfection. As someone who has been a season subscriber in the LA theater scene for over ten years, this was particularly hysterical to me--how much truth there was.

But, trust me, you don't have to be a theater goer or a Shakespeare enthusiast to enjoy this program. But you do have to enjoy smart, sophisticated entertainment with top notch performances.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Joel Rafi Zabor on August 24, 2006
Format: DVD
The first season of Slings and Arrows was the best thing to turn up on English language television in I don't know how many years. The second seasons sags a bit in the middle but recovers wonderfully by the end. The problem has to do with spurious, often unconvincing plot contrivances intended to keep the principal characters busy for six episodes. They seem hastily conceived. The worst of them has to do with an ad agency; others have to do with a tax examination and a couple of romances, BUT: despite these patches of weak writing, the original characters, and a couple of new ones, are as appealing as before, the individual and ensemble acting are superb as ever, and the simultaneously warm and unsparing comedy seems a kind of miracle. The wrap-up, involving Banquo (in the production of Macbeth) and a side-effect of a rescued production of Romeo and Juliet, is wonderfully written and played and seems an augury of better days ahead in the third and apparently final season. I give this four stars only to provide a contrast with the sublime first season. This is still nearly solid gold.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 24, 2007
Format: DVD
As fine as Season One of this truly wonderful series was, Season Two was, in my opinion, even better. The series takes us even deeper into the characters, sharpens the humor, thickens the plot, and delves even more deeply into Shakespeare than in Season One. Viewing Season One did not make me want to rush out and read HAMLET, but Season Two did make me rush out to read MACBETH.

This ability to multitask is what makes SLINGS AND ARROWS such a wonderful series. It manages to do several things on several different levels remarkably well. I've read several books on Shakespeare, including those by Stephen Greenblatt, Peter Levi, and Stanley Cavell, as well as the wonderful prefaces by Samuel Johnson, but I can honestly say that I got as much insight from many wonderful little moments in this series as in any of those. Cavell is brilliant, but some of his essays are so far removed from the play that I'm not sure what work of art he is discussing (I'm reminded of somebody's--I'm not sure who--comment about James Agee's film criticism that it takes you directly into the heart of a film; Cavell is brilliant, but I never felt Shakespeare's pulse reading him).

As funny as the show was in Season One, it got even funnier in Season Two. The bits about the "rebranding" firm Frog and Hammer are among the funniest things I've ever seen on TV. I always enjoy Colm Feore, but his turn as Sanjay, the head of Frog and Hammer, is the best thing I've ever seen him do. The twists and turns of his character are simply brilliant.

The backstage drama is even more engrossing, as Geoffrey "collaborates" with Oliver in staging a version of MACBETH based on the latter's design for the play.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on March 13, 2007
Format: DVD
Call me superstitious or cowardly or weak

But I'll never play a character

Whose name one dare not speak

I'll play Hamlet

In doublet and hose

Or either of the Dromeos

But sorry, I won't play Mackers

I'll play Richard the Third

With a hump and wig

Or Henry the Eighth

That selfish pig

But sorry, I don't do Mackers

Every soul who plays this role

Risks injury or death

I'd rather sweep the bloody stage

Then ever do

Mac-you-know-who

When I watched the first three episodes of Season 2 of "Slings & Arrows" on the first of these two DVDS I have to admit that I was wondering what happened to the series. Like those of us with a background in the theater, I fell in love with the New Burbage Theatre Festival and its madman artistic director Geoffrey Tennant (Paul Gross). If his bouts with mental problems were not enough, Geoffrey is saddled with a leading lady, Ellen Fanshaw (Martha Burns), who is his once (and perhaps future) girl friend and the ghost of Oliver Welles (Stephen Ouimette), his predecessor whose sudden death got him his current gig. The first season was all about staging "Hamlet" with a television star as the melancholy Dane, while the second season finds Geoffrey tackling the Scottish play (hence the title song, "Mackers," quoted above). But Geoffrey is running around dealing with not only Oliver's ghost and all those notebooks his predecessor left behind about directing the play, which gives plenty of time for the associated curse to wreck some havoc.
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