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Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg (A Fairy Dust Trilogy Book) Hardcover – September 21, 2005


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 6 and up
  • Grade Level: 1 - 3
  • Lexile Measure: 660L (What's this?)
  • Series: A Fairy Dust Trilogy Book
  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Disney Press; First Edition edition (September 21, 2005)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0786834919
  • ISBN-13: 978-0786834914
  • Product Dimensions: 0.8 x 7.5 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (60 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #868,636 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Seasoned fractured fairy tale teller Gail Carson Levine provides the captivating back story of Tinker Bell and Co. in this lavishly illustrated addition to the Neverland canon. Freckled and eager to please, Prilla is a brand new fairy, born of a baby's laugh. Upon her arrival to Neverland, she is dismayed to discover she has no talent for any of the fairy avocations. Tinker Bell (a pots-and-pans-talent fairy) takes Prilla to see Mother Dove, whose single blue egg holds the secret of the island's eternal youth. But before the wise bird can advise Prilla, Neverland is shaken by a terrible hurricane. Mother Dove is thrown off her nest, and the precious egg is shattered. Immediately, Neverland folk begin to age.

The island's only hope is for some brave fairies to take the egg pieces to Kyto the dragon and ask him to restore it with his fiery breath. But first, the fairies must collect treasures with which to bribe the evil dragon. Mother Dove chooses Prilla to be part of the fairy team to undertake the quest for the egg. Can one little no-talent fairy help save Neverland from certain doom? While Fairy Dust is unabashedly based on Disney's Peter Pan, Levine's companion version feels wonderfully fresh and original. The charming maxims of Levine's fairy world (fairies say "Fly with you," instead of "Pleased to meet you," and need dust made from Mother Dove's feathers to fly) along with David Christiana's sumptuous illustrations breathe new life into a beloved classic. --Jennifer Hubert

From School Library Journal

Grade 2-4–Unbeknownst to many, the fairies of Never Land have an intricate community in which everyone is useful to society. And, sadly, the newest arrival, Prilla, just doesn't fit in, for she appears without knowing what her particular talent is. Is she a tinker who likes to fix pots and pans like Tinker Bell? Or should she play with water like sweet Ree? Prilla's problems quickly become moot when the source of all magic on Never Land, a mysterious egg belonging to motherly Mama Dove, is destroyed in a vicious hurricane. Now Prilla and two other fairies must embark on a quest to save the egg and, with it, Never Land's secret of youth before it is too late. This book isn't going to bowl anyone over with its originality, and Levine isn't afraid to employ a little deus ex machina when the fancy strikes her, but overall it's an engaging tale. The story is exciting, the characters accessible if stock, and Christiana's lush, full-color illustrations breathtaking. Children already enamored of the Disney Princess line will be clamoring for it.–Elizabeth Bird, New York Public Library
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

More About the Author

Gail Carson Levine grew up in New York City and has been writing all her life. Her first book for children, Ella Enchanted, was a 1998 Newbery Honor Book. Levine's other books include Dave At Night, an ALA Notable Book and Best Book for Young Adults; The Wish; The Two Princesses of Bamarre; and her Princess Tales books: The Princess Test, The Fairy's Mistake, Princess Sonora and the Long Sleep, Cinderellis and the Glass Hill, For Biddle's Sake and The Fairy's Return. She is also the author of the picture book Betsy Who Cried Wolf, illustrated by Scott Nash. Gail, her husband, David, and their Airedale, Baxter, live in a two-hundred-year-old farmhouse in the Hudson River Valley.

In Her Own Words..."I grew up in New York City. In elementary school I was a charter member of the Scribble Scrabble Club, and in high school my poems were published in an anthology of student poetry. I didn't want to be a writer. First I wanted to act and then I wanted to be a painter like my big sister. In college, I was a Philosophy major, and my prose style was very dry and dull! My interest in the theater led me to my first writing experience as an adult. My husband David wrote the music and lyrics and I wrote the book for a children's musical, Spacenapped that was produced by a neighborhood theater in Brooklyn.

"And my painting brought me to writing for children in earnest. I took a class in writing and illustrating children's books and found that I was much more interested in the writing than in the illustrating.

"Most of my job life has had to do with welfare, first helping people find work and then as an administrator. The earlier experience was more direct and satisfying, and I enjoy thinking that a bunch of people somewhere are doing better today than they might have done if not for me."

Customer Reviews

The illustrations are GORGEOUS!
FAIRY GIRLS
I read this book to my then 5 year old daughter and instantly we were both "hooked."
Jacqueline Young
We own all of the disney fairy books, and my daughter loves them!
S. Veeman

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Erika Sorocco on September 1, 2005
Format: Hardcover
When a baby giggles, the giggle finds its way to Never Land, and a new fairy is born. This is how Prilla, the newest fairy, arrives in Never Land. However, Never Land is unsure as to whether or not she should be permitted entrance to Fairy Land. After all, she's one very peculiar fairy. For instance, unlike other Never fairies, Prilla greets her newfound friends with a handshake, and the words "Pleased to meet you," as opposed to saying "Fly with you." As if that weren't bad enough, she refers to Tinker Bell - a pots and pans fairy, and the star fairy of J.M. Barrie's classic PETER PAN - as Miss Bell. Let's face it, Prilla acts much more like a Clumsy - a human being - than an ethereal fairy; and to make matters worse, she has no talent. But Mother Dove, the God-like creature of Never Land has faith in Prilla, and thinks that she does have a talent, she simply hasn't found it yet. So when Mother Dove's egg is lost in a huge storm, Prilla, along with two fellow fairies, Rani and Vidia, set out on a quest that will lead them past mermaids, a golden hawk, an evil dragon, and Captain Hook, and test the fate of Never Land.

I have been a fan of Gail Carson Levine since I read ELLA ENCHANTED, so when I heard that FAIRY DUST AND THE QUEST FOR THE EGG was being released, I knew that I just had to have it. After all, Tinkerbell - one of my favorite Disney characters - was going to have a large part in the story. Upon purchasing the book, my attention was captured by the marvelous story Levine had woven. However, the illustrations by David Christiana made my jaw drop in awe. Even if you are not a fan of Gail Carson Levine or fairy stories, this is a book that everyone should own for the art alone.
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23 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Maelan_of_Numina on August 31, 2005
Format: Hardcover
Being a huge fan of both Disney's Tinkerbell and the incredibly talented Gail Carson Levine, I was very excited to find this book. Ms. Levine has an uncanny knack for keeping readers involved with the story, about a new fairy to Neverland who feels out of place because she can't find her own talent. I thought it witty that Tinkerbell's talent was to fix pots and pans (thus for the first part of her name "Tinker"). The illustrations are done in watercolor - gorgeously portraying Neverland and it's inhabitants as the adventure goes along.

Overall, I would absolutely encourage everyone who loves imagination to purchase this book, whether they are Disney or Ms. Levine's fans or not.

Simply Stunning!
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on September 24, 2005
Format: Hardcover
I just finished this book a few minutes ago. It is my favorite book by her. I am in 4th grade and I just love this book. It has a lot of adventure and it is about Prilla the fairy finding her talent. If you like her other books you will love this one! Please try this book and if you do, you will love it!
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15 of 17 people found the following review helpful By Kelly Braun on November 6, 2006
Format: Hardcover
I loved the beautiful watercolor illustrations for this book. Unfortunately I would not recommend the story for a child under 7 or 8. This was definitely too depressing for my 5 year old. The Quest is adventurous and a bit scary which my child dealt with well but the Mother Dove character is on the verge of death most of the book. Her injuries are described in graphic detail and could be upsetting to a child expecting a light, fun fairy story. SPOILER ALERT: The ending was disappointing to me. After 100 pages of the brave fairies weathering hardships the idea that children clapping for Never Land fixing everything felt incongruous with the book's tone - it becomes a story meant for an older child with an ending meant for a toddler.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By M. Lilliquist on July 7, 2006
Format: Hardcover
Gail Carson Levine has a well-earned reputation as one of the best authors for middle-grade children, through such books as "Ella Enchanted," "The Two Princesses of Bamarre" and the Princess Tales series. Indeed she has made something of an industry out of re-working, up-dating (and vastly improving) traditional European fairy tales. The results are amusing, engaging, sophisticated stories filled with subtle lessons, interesting plot twists, and fully-realized characters. Kids love 'em, and parents love 'em.

And so it is no wonder that Disney turned to Levine to write the inaugural book in a planned series of fairy stories. In "Fairy Dust and the Quest for the Egg" we are introduced (re-introduced) to the Neverland of Tinker Bell and Peter Pan. But, as usual for Levine, she has re-imagined and added depth to Neverland. Even Tinker Bell, a stereotypical one-note character in Disney's hands becomes an interesting, intelligent and attractive person in Levine's tale. Levine invents a new world, with its own history and magical rules, and populates it with interesting characters. In the subsequent books in this series, five so far, many of these characters get their own story and their own adventure (more on that later).

"Quest for the Egg" is the tale of Prilla, a brand-new fairy of a kind never known before in Neverland. At first, both Prilla and the other fairies do not know what to make of her, but by the end of the tale, Prilla and the others find love and acceptance for each other. Along the way, there are discoveries and adventure with a mean-spirited dragon, haughty mermaids, and even a comical Captain Hook. Throughout, Levine moves the story along with a clear emphasis upon characters, relationships, feelings and motivations.
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