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Fairy Tales Can Come True: How a Driven Woman Changed Her Destiny Hardcover – May 6, 2003


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 400 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow; 1st edition (May 6, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060524014
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060524012
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 5 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.9 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,438,701 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

In this solid memoir, Klieman, the tough, hardworking, fast-talking trial attorney and Court TV anchor, describes how she relentlessly prepared for high-profile cases, yet wasn't above wearing pretty dresses in court to soothe petulant judges. Inappropriately titled (there's little magic in Klieman's descriptions of 20-hour workdays and the chronic tension that found her routinely vomiting on Sunday nights before another week of work at the intense Boston law firm Choate, Hall), Klieman's tale isn't exactly one of a poor girl being rescued by a handsome prince. Klieman was smart enough to mix her own skills with savvy. She knew how to network, whether schmoozing with politicians or closing down the bars with fellow lawyers and cops after a day in court. Interestingly, Klieman trained as an actress before going into law, and her descriptions of the theatrics involved in trials (including her plea bargain for FBI fugitive Katherine Ann Power) are the book's strength. In 1999, Klieman married her third husband, Bill Bratton, who is now Los Angeles chief of police. The book ends as the East Coast-based Klieman follows Bratton west as he assumes his new post. "I was faced with... moving my life to another coast without a clue as to what I was going to do, with no security except the love of my husband," she writes. "How daring. What a trial. How very postfeminist." Not to worry. It appears the first thing she did is write an honest book that should appeal to women trying to have it all. Color photos not seen by PW.
Copyright 2003 Reed Business Information, Inc.

Review

"a riveting, brutally honest, memoir...filled with spirit and joy as Rikki describes falling in love..." -- CrimeLynx

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Customer Reviews

3.5 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 16, 2004
Format: Hardcover
In this book I found an enlightening story about the struggle to get to the top. A great description of the amount of dedication and self-sacrifice necessary to overcome obstacles, define (and redefine) goals, and to never stop moving forward. For any young woman looking to see what it takes to get to the top of her respective field, this is a wonderful story-if it is taken with a grain of salt. Even though Mrs. Klieman seems to find strength in her struggle in a man's world, she digresses to hypocrisy and to being just like a man more than she gives herself credit for.
You can call her a slut, or a liberated woman (that's the way it was in the 70s according to her). You can call her driven, or you can call her obsessed to a fault. You can say she is focused, or you can say that she ignores what fails to progress her theme-she is a good lawyer after all.
She writes that she never wanted to be placed ahead because she was a woman. But in one part of the book she calls a judge who also happened to be her ex (they dated while she was CLERKING!!)so that he could get her an interview with someone she otherwise would have had to wait months to see. This is just one example of many sordid situations. She is appalled when she is passed up for a judgeship because, according to her, she was too pretty. Yet there is clear evidence that she uses her looks just as much as she uses her brains. She also seems to think she is a super good-looking lady. She mentions it so, so, so many times it starts to get ridiculous!!! (is it just me, or is she not really that hot?
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 22, 2003
Format: Hardcover
"Look at my pictures with famous people. Read about my new house so you can see how much money I made. Admire me because I say I kept my extra-marital affair secret so that I wouldn't hurt or embarass my ex-husband or my current husband's wife. And for God's sake, don't notice the inconsistency between that and the fact that I rushed to write this book about exactly that affair. AREN'T I SPECIAL?"
Narcissists can be charming, but the preening and self-absorption become boring pretty quickly. In this case, extremely quickly.
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12 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 14, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This misguided manufactured celebrity is a perfect example of how someone of average intelligence, given enough greed and encouragement, can make a pile of money. That's about it.The writing style reveals worlds about her literary insularity.The monumental lack of self-awareness makes this book a good candidate for the Horror genre. If books by famous people interest you, I'd advise something by a professional wrestler. They know how to apply makeup, which is more than I can say for Ms. Klieman.
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on August 13, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This is one of the worst books I've ever read. The writing is extremely juvenile and Ms. Klieman is not remotely as interesting as she seems to think she is. She doesn't know the first thing about empowering women. It appears she lives in a fairy tale world of her own imagination, but imagining something doesn't make it real.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 12, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Ms. Klieman comes across as vapid and tiresome. Save your money and your time for something worthwhile--and interesting. This is neither.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 20, 2004
Format: Hardcover
Rikki Klieman is not much of a writer and less of a person. There is nothing here of interest or value.
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9 of 11 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 31, 2003
Format: Hardcover
The best part of the book is Klieman's discussion of her cases and her law career. She is clearly a talented woman, but also a monstrously self-absorbed one. But perhaps that's the curse of the successful woman...
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11 of 14 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 3, 2003
Format: Hardcover
I bought this book because I have admired Kleiman's work on CourtTV. The book was a disappointment to me because:
* I can no longer think of Klieman as a role model for anyone, personally or professionally, because she has apparently been a lifelong user of men in her work as well as in her personal life. One minute she complains of her treatment based on her gender, the next minute she brags about using her gender to her advantage in the workplace. I'm quite unclear as to how she can be a role model for lawyers, because while Kleiman clearly has been extremely successful in her chosen profession, throughout the book she tells the reader how the work almost killed her, ruined her health, ruined her personal life, etc. I can't see how anyone would want to emulate that.
*Klieman tells at great length of her representation of a fugitive cop killer, and how noble she felt when arranging for the woman to spend time with her family before turning herself in (and how she did this against the express advice of the FBI, local law enforcement, and the DA's office). I just wonder how Klieman would feel about another lawyer doing the same thing if the dead cop in question were to someday be Klieman's current husband, Bill Bratton.
*Too many times while reading the book I just couldn't like this woman because of her arrogance. For one thing, Klieman felt the need to inform the reader ad nauseum that she is pretty, oh so pretty. And of being able to get her hair done in LA on a moment's notice shortly after her husband was named the new Police Commissioner, Klieman writes, "It's good to be the wife of the king." To me, she just came off in the book as being much too full of herself and waaaayy overly impressed by her own physical attributes.
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