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Faith and Other Flat Tires: Searching for God on the Rough Road of Doubt Kindle Edition

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Length: 305 pages Word Wise: Enabled
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Editorial Reviews

Review

'With honesty and candor, Andrea Palpant shares her sense of displacement, as a 'third-culture kid' finding her way in America and as a once confident Christian beset with doubt and confusion in a postmodern world. I suspect many readers will find themselves in the questions that drive her away from faith. I also pray that, in her story, they will also see a pathway back. At this time in our culture, and in the church, we are in need of people like Andrea, who do not shy away from their questions and doubts, who do not fear bearing their souls, and who show us a way through to the other side of faith.' -- Dr. Steve Sherwood <br><br>

About the Author

Andrea Palpant Dilley grew up in Kenya as the daughter of Quaker missionaries and spent the rest of her childhood in the Pacific Northwest. Her work as a documentary producer has aired nationally on American Public Television. Her work as a writer has been published in Geez, Utne Reader and the anthology Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing Up Female and Evangelical, as well as online with CNN, The Huffington Post, and Christianity Today. Her memoir, Faith and Other Flat Tires: Searching for God on the Rough Road of Doubt, tells the story of her faith journey. Andrea lives with her husband and their two daughters in Austin, Texas. For more information, visit www.andreapalpantdilley.com

Product Details

  • File Size: 2348 KB
  • Print Length: 305 pages
  • Page Numbers Source ISBN: 031032551X
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Up to 5 simultaneous devices, per publisher limits
  • Publisher: Zondervan (February 21, 2012)
  • Publication Date: February 21, 2012
  • Sold by: HarperCollins Publishing
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0058CWYTA
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #332,639 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

Andrea Palpant Dilley grew up in Kenya as the daughter of Quaker missionaries and spent the rest of her childhood in the Pacific Northwest. Her work as a documentary producer has aired nationally on American Public Television. Her work as a writer has been published in Geez, Utne Reader and the anthology "Jesus Girls: True Tales of Growing Up Female and Evangelical," as well as online with CNN, The Huffington Post, and Christianity Today. Her memoir, "Faith and Other Flat Tires: Searching for God on the Rough Road of Doubt" (Zondervan), tells the story of her faith journey.

Andrea lives with her husband and their two daughters in Austin, Texas. For more information, go to www.faithandotherflattires.com

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 23 people found the following review helpful By W. Edwards on February 22, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
So many memoirs about faith are surprisingly materialistic. Author is raised as a believer; X happens; author looses faith and plunges into horrible life of secularism. Y happens and author regains faith and becomes fully functioning member of society. She rides off into a doubtless sunset. In those memoirs, there is no room given to the gray area between faith and secularism, no mention to how the author dealt with doubts in the mind and griefs of the heart.

If those books are external memoirs (everything is on the surface), then Faith and Other Flat Tires is an internal memoir. It is a book by a bright, introspective woman who finds problems with religion in all manner of ways. An Eric Clapton concert is as likely to raise tough theological questions as does having to bury a childhood friend. Dilley's memoirs outline how she grew up a missionary kid and then became a 'melancholy Christian' before leaving the church. She eventually found that the same questions that drove her away from God ended up driving her back to faith once again. She returns to God hesitantly, with battle wounds and hope and also - get this - without all the answers.

As a memoir, this book is funny and honest. Dilley doesn't paint herself as a victim or a saint. She's awkward at times, painfully aware of her flaws and she bravely lays her selfish moments and bad choices along with her honesty and courage. She acknowledges that her tale is not a 'my life was the worst life ever' story. Rather, it's a tale of how a person can loose faith while still maintaining a 4.0 - how even the seemingly 'good' kids can find themselves stomping out of the church and slamming the doors behind them (literally) because their questions are not being answered.
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15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Patrick B Wicker on February 20, 2012
Format: Paperback
Andrea Dilley gives a rich, honest and often funny account of her personal and spiritual journey. It is not a simple story of leaving and returning to faith, and as read I wondered what would have happened if the Prodigal Son had stayed home. There never would have been broken relationship with the father or the baggage of his life of sin, but he could have stayed and ended up worse than a starving pig farmer. He could have ended up even worse than his older brother. He could have simply gone into his room and tuned out.

This is no ordinary Prodigal Son story, and apathy towards God was never an option for Andrea. She was a missionary kid who grew up in a loving home and church community, and yet from her early teens she was deeply disturbed with the brokenness of the world, the relevance of church, and the seeming absence of God in the midst of the mess. Of course, taking God and the mess seriously should ideally happen within the church community, but he often allows us to leave home without letting us get too far away from him. We discover that our answers can only be found at home, as we see our Father there from a distance, holding the robe, ring and pair of shoes.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful By spporter on August 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
Andrea Palpant's Faith and Other Flat Tires is a personal memoir about the doubts about God she developed as a missionary child in Africa. There were a lot of things I liked about this book. For example the writing was incredible. Being a writing instructor myself, I always get a little giddy when I come across a Christian book that actually shows some knowledge of the craft. Palpant's background in Communications definitely shines in this book and makes it an enjoyable read.

Her story is also fairly typical of God's grandchildren, a.k.a. kids who grew up with true believing parents that wanted nothing more than to serve God with all their heart. These kids usually don't really get their parents or the God they serve but have a hard time finding any contentment in the world. Until they really give their lives to God and have their own relationship with them, they also can't find contentment in the church, so they end up thrown all over the place in their beliefs.

Been there, done that.

The major drawback of the book is that she structures it around John Bunyan's Pilgrim's Progress and the journey that Christian takes, but she definitely focuses more on Christian's pratfalls, then on some of the elements of Bunyan's metaphor that exemplify God's part in our walk like Help, Goodwill, Faithful, Hopeful, The Shining Ones, the Lord of the Hill, etc.

The lack of these characters' traits shows through in Palpant's memoir as well. Even in the grand climax where she returns to church, she doesn't necessarily do it because she finds much hope there, but just because it's better than the other options. There's no relationship with Jesus, no revelation of God in her life, just a meandering fall back into church community.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Forrest E. Baird on March 18, 2012
Format: Paperback
Faith and Other Flat Tires is exactly the kind of book Christians and ex-Christians should read. Andrea Palpant Dilley tells the personal story of overcoming the secular/sacred divide and learning to live her faith without hiding her doubts. One of the earlier reviews on this site decried this book as a "downer" and that Dilley is "stuck...just treading water." Nothing could be further from the truth! Dilley refuses to give the triumphalist ending that so many Christian books demand, yet there is a solidity to her commitment that shows her desire to honor God, follow Christ, and serve humanity. For the Christian, Dilley asks for an honesty and shows a path to belief that does not paper-over problems or resort to simple answers. For the ex-Christian, she shows a way back to faith that does not ask someone to pretend they are something they are not. This is what grace is all about, and this book shows it clearly.

One of the paradoxes about a book like this is that in telling a story that is very specific and very personal, Dilley has actually made it more inviting and universal. There were so many places where I thought "oh, I have felt that exact same thing!" even though my college and post-college experience was decades ago and miles away. Dilley has managed to write something that is both very personal yet speaks to a common experience that most Christians (at least if they are honest with themselves) have also faced. One of the things I especially appreciated is that she never put down or demeaned what she was or what other people are...the sort of "I used to think this way, but now I am so much more enlightened" that one frequently finds in this genre. Instead, Dilley tells her story as one pilgrim who has gone along a path and wants to share it with others who may cover some of the same landscape. An amazing first book...I hope there are many more to come!
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