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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Refreshing Overview of What the Gospel Is and How We Live Out the New Identity It Gives Us, January 25, 2013
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This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
When a friend looked at the new book on my desk and asked me what "Faithmapping" was about, I confess I wasn't exactly sure. But when I started reading, it became wonderfully clear: "Faithmapping" aims to give followers of Jesus a compass and a map for navigating the Christian life in the midst of a broken world and disconnected viewpoints within Christianity itself. Sound ambitious? The beauty of the book is its clear, simple, and vivid definitions and their down-to-earth applications. Montgomery and Cosper's writing is both balanced and imaginative. As lead pastors of Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, KY (a church with roots in an artistic, urban subculture which has grown into a four campus megachurch), they creatively bring together a holistic picture of the Christian life.

This life is centered in the gospel of Jesus. In the midst of Christian fads and pendulum swings, they present one gospel that can be viewed through three interconnected aspects. The Gospel of the Kingdom: life with God as it was intended to be, under God's rule and reign, has come. The Gospel of the Cross: through the life, death, and resurrection of Jesus, we have been made right with God. And the Gospel of Grace: God accepts us and shares his life freely with us at Christ's expense. Each aspect is shown to be integrally related to the others and is vividly illustrated. This gospel brings us into God's one Church, in which we live out five identities: we are worshipers, family, servants, disciples, and witnesses. The context for living these out is the world: our location (homes and neighborhoods), vocation, recreation, restoration (meeting needs), and multiplication.

I can say with certainty that the content of "Faithmapping" (as I've been exposed to it through the ministries of Sojourn over the past 2 years) has helped me make connections in my thinking that have changed the way I live and brought clarity to the way I communicate the gospel. It alleviates the tension often felt between how the gospel changes life here and now, how we enter that life, and what we look forward to in hope. It's given me a grid for thinking through what I read. It's grounded ministry opportunities by forcing me to think through how various aspects of the gospel and our identity are communicated through my everyday conversations, small group discussions, and service opportunities. Most importantly, it's contributed to broadening the way I try to remind myself of the gospel when I find myself drifting.

In terms of potential weaknesses of the book, Part 3 (Whole World) cries out for a fuller treatment. The nature of the book is that each part can be "zoomed in" on, just like you could look at a Google map of the US, zoom in on Kentucky, and then Louisville. Volumes have been written on the subjects of the various chapters, and a helpful list for further reading has been provided. But Part 3 seemed especially short and somewhat hurried, and no further reading list is provided for this section, giving it a somewhat "tacked on" feel. It's rich stuff - but really needs more space.

I'm thankful for Montgomery and Cosper, and for the way God has gifted them in holding together His truth and presenting it with clarity and imagination. Get your hands on a copy no matter where you're at on your spiritual journey, and have a highlighter ready. You'll be wanting to talk about this one together with others on the path.

(Note to the editor/publisher: another minor weakness of the book as it stands is multiple typographical errors that were a bit distracting [misspelled words, phrases repeated, etc.. would love to see these corrected in the next printing.]
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Challenging, Convicting, and Confession-Inducing, March 8, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Cosper and Montgomery believe that "we are navigating the Christian life with fragments of a map--bits and pieces of the good news--rather than the whole picture". Faithmapping is an attempt to "put those map fragments together". They argue that we ought to think of the gospel in a tri-perspectival manner. Rather than emphasizing the kingdom, the cross, or grace we ought to bring these all together into a whole gospel.

The churches identity and mission flow out the gospel. "...the gospel, the church, and our mission are a coherent, organic, interrelated whole, rather than distinct independent ideas". That is why the authorial intention of this book is to map a "whole gospel for the whole church on mission in the whole world".

The book is structured around these themes. First, the whole gospel is outlined. One chapter is given to each of the perspectives (kingdom, cross, grace) and then and argument is made that we need the whole gospel. The gospel informs the churches identity. The second section outlines these five aspects of "gospel-informed identity". These five might sound familiar: worship, family, servants, disciples, and witnesses. The last section, only one chapter, makes the argument that it is within the whole world that the church lives out their "gospel-transformed lives".

The book is well written. Jessica Thompson is correct when she says "it is theologically profound and yet very easy to read". Though it may feel a little like being entered into the middle of a theological discussion, I do believe that the average lay person would have no problem navigating their way through this book. In the same vein a well seasoned theologian would not be bored.

With all of the focus these days on gospel-centered books I believe this book is a welcome addition. I appreciate that Cosmer and Montgomery tie together friends that are often treated as enemies; namely the gospel as kingdom and the gospel of the cross. I also believe every disciple would greatly benefit from a thorough exploration of the second section of this book. The Map It section at the end of each chapter would make this book pretty easily adaptable for a small group gathering.

Personally, I found myself convicted, challenged, and confessing as I read through this book. It helped me as a pastor to articulate points better. But even more than that it helped me as a disciple to be a more holistic follower of Christ.

I would recommend this book to anyone
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent book. Very readable, practical, and doctrinal., August 5, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Faithmapping is one of the best books on understanding the gospel and its practical implications in the daily lives of believers I have read. It has a solid theological foundation, but it is very practical and easy to read. One of the strengths of this book is that I can give it to a relatively new Christian and know that they not only can read it and understand it, but that it will ground them in some much needed and often over-looked theological truths.

The authors of the book do a very good job of presenting what is called a "triperspectival" approach to the gospel. The gospel is a brilliant, multifaceted gem. Every angle that you look at it shows you another brilliant truth. Sometimes, authors trying to write about the gospel will focus on one specific aspect to the neglect of others and in the process may give an unbalanced understanding that only this one thing is the key to understanding "the gospel". Montgomery and Cosper do a good job of presenting three "perspectives" that are equally vital in our understanding of the gospel - the gospel as the kingdom of God, the gospel as seen in the cross, and the gospel as shown in the grace of God. One of the most important parts of Faithmapping is that they define what the gospel looks like in each individual aspect and then they show why we most not elevate one aspect to the neglect of the others. This balanced approach is refreshing and invigorating as you read this book.

The authors also do an excellent job of showing how; once we come to a balanced, biblical approach to the gospel, this same gospel has practical affects on the way we worship as individuals and as a faith community. It affects our understanding of the church as a faith "family" of adopted sons and daughters of God. It affects our mentality of serving and being served and motivates us to take up the towel and serve others. It affects us as growing disciples of Jesus Christ who are also responsible to make other disciples. Finally, it affects our witness to the world in both words and actions that are compatible with the gospel.

I have read a lot of books already this year, but I would put Faithmapping in the top three I have read so far. I believe many people in the church can benefit greatly from picking up a copy of this work and applying it to their lives.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Perfect for any Christian at any stage, February 26, 2013
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This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Mike and Daniel have a real winner with this book. With the "Gospel-Centered" fad in the churches and the intensely increased volume of voices telling us what to believe and think about the Bible, my head tends to spin and I sometimes feel like I don't understand my own faith. Daniel and Mike nailed down the essentials in a way that's so simple and accessible but refuses to sacrifice on richness and depth so that anyone can greatly benefit from this book!

The first part alone is worth purchasing the whole book. Finally a CLEAR and understandable presentation of the whole Gospel. Everything that's essential to your understanding of the Good News of what Jesus did, how He did it, and why He did it is packed into the first 3 chapters. Kingdom, Cross, and Grace are simple enough to hold onto daily, but deep enough to explore continually. Then in the second part they flesh out real life application without pulling any punches. They call us to be whole Christians and to embrace all that God has called and purchased for us to be. I was really blessed by the first two parts of the book.

My critiques would be on two things. First, as Andrew said, the 3rd part is not given as much detail and richness as the other two parts. Totally applicable and understandable stuff, but it definitely gives the journey a more abrupt ending rather than smooth descent, kinda like the movie Flight (but not a horrific plane crash). Second, I wasn't a fan of the "Zoom in/Zoom out" chunk at the end of the Kingdom, Cross, and Grace sections. I didn't find them to be as applicable and expanding a tool as the "Map it" sections in the Second Part. I like that they get you into more Scripture, but I felt like they didn't accomplish what they were trying to. The "Map it" sections however were fantastic! Great, applicable, straight to the heart questions to get you moving forward in your faith.

Overall this book needs to be in your library, but more importantly in your heart and mind. If you are a Christian, this book WILL help you learn and love the Gospel and start applying it to your life in new and better ways!
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Clear and Balanced Framework, February 17, 2013
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This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Much of daily life is marked by confusion and a lack of direction. In their book, Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey, Daniel Montgomery and Mike Cosper offer a framework to provide both scope and direction for Christian living today. Montgomery and Cosper are the founding pastors of Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, Kentucky. Both men live and raise their families in the urban communities that they desire to reach.

The lack of direction that the church faces today is undoubtedly visible, and most assuredly not a new phenomenon. Given the significance this poses, Montgomery and Cosper's framework attempts to bring the church back to the center of its faith and practice. For the authors, the answer to this dilemma rests in clarifying what the Bible says concerning these questions and acknowledging that a wholistic, balanced approach is essential to the Christian life. To explain this, the remainder of the book is devoted to elaborating on the framework of the Whole Gospel, the Whole Church, and the Whole World.

While reading through Faithmapping, the most consistent strength I noticed was clarity. From the organization of the chapters to the repetition of the concept "whole", one can easily understand and apply the framework. By far, the second strongest element was the authors' desire to see a balance across the board in the area of understanding and living out the Whole Gospel. Today's church is largely divided into different `tribes' of churches that tend to camp out on one aspect of the gospel - God's Kingdom, Cross, or Grace. Addressing both the trappings and the essential good of each gospel aspect helps us to bring our attention to the necessity of the three aspects of the gospel. By reducing the "gospel" to only one aspect, the Church is missing out on the beauty, depth, and richness of the whole gospel.

In Faithmapping, the authors also suggest five identities that were perfectly displayed in the person of Jesus Christ. These are not the only identities that we can live out, but they are ways that we can identify first, who we are in Christ and second, how what we do flows from this reality. The authors' emphasis on balance, again, presents a more biblical and much broader scope for what it means to be a Christian. A narrow gospel produces narrow Christians, while a whole gospel invites Christians into the journey of their faith - a life of renewal and powerful change.

As for a weakness, opposed to the vast majority of the book, the ending of the book seemed to be loosely put together and lacked the finality of a strong argument. The neglect to restate their argument and where they had taken the reader made the ending appear unresolved. In addition, the last part - " The Whole World" - lacked the level of clarity and development apparent in the first two parts.

This excellent read impacted me as I was convicted by my own narrow-minded tendencies in understanding and preaching the gospel. It is as though I have been given a pair of new glasses and am now able to see blind spots in my own heart and life where a different articulation of the gospel is needed. This book can and should be used in any context. From forming a vision for the local church to sharing with your neighbor God's desire for the world, this simple framework is solid. Montgomery and Cosper have crafted a much-needed addition to the current literature on spiritual formation. I would recommend this book to any and every Christian seeking clarity in the church today - to the scholar and stay-at-home mom alike. The pastor-authors have written an accessible work, full of necessary personal reflection and insight.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Gospel-Centered + Missional, February 4, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
I usually don't include blurbs about books in my review but this sums up the book so well: "The missional focus of this contribution to the gospel-centered movement is a breath of fresh air" Ed Stetzer ("The gospel that saves us motivates us to live on mission" [p. 19]).

Montgomery and Cosper have sought to provide a map of the gospel within a missional framework. The book separates neatly into three parts: gospel, church, and world. As they concisely explain, "[Faithmapping is] an exploration of a whole gospel for a whole church for the sake of the whole world" (p. 17).

Part 1 tackles the under-estimated and under-appreciated gospel. They've argued the church has argued for parts of the gospel successfully but rarely has she put all the pieces together. They argue for three components for a whole gospel: kingdom, grace, and cross.

In regards to the kingdom, says Montgomery and Cosper,
It's an incredible plan. The ruler of the kingdom suffers for the subjects. He humbles himself and lives among them, suffering under the same injustice, encountering the same competing kingdoms. Jesus encountered the authority of the kingdoms around him, all the while preaching that God's kingdom was here, and was greater than all these others. He suffered under Pilate's kingdom. He suffered under religious corruption--a kind of kingdom. He suffered under Satan's kingdom, subject even to death. Yet in humbling himself, he flips the whole world on its head, and this crucified and downtrodden one becomes the name exalted above every name. (p. 38)
This section has a strong focus on repentance ("change our allegiance" p. 40).

The gospel of the cross focuses on what you might typically see emphasized (justification, reconciliation, righteousness, sacrifice, and union with Christ) in Reformed circles.
The cross is not peripheral. It's not something that we encounter at the beginning of our Christian journey and move beyond as we mature in discipleship. It's the center of our faith, the hub from which every good thing flows. (p. 65)
The gospel of grace wraps up the whole gospel. They say,
The gospel declares that our right standing with God and our continued life in his kingdom is all a gift of his grace. Life with God comes by grace. The cross is given to us by grace. We have life with God not because of anything we have or could have done or anything we have failed to do but because God has freely given it to us at Jesus's expense. We are safe, we are accepted, we are loved because God has made it so by his grace. Period. (p. 80)
They're praising the scandalous grace of God that takes dirty, rotten sinners like you and me and welcomes us into his family. The great equalizer. This grace motivates us to live for God.

I wanted to share a descriptor from each of these gospel pieces to give you a taste of what you can expect in these sections. My only thought in these section was, "I think they're right, but I wonder if they might have missed the unifying element?" God's covenant in Christ encapsulates all of these gospel pieces. It's the glue. God makes a covenant as a King ruling his kingdom bringing peace by the terms of this covenant through justification, freeing former rebels and slaves, and making them sons and daughters. Just a thought.

Chart A
Part 2 talks church. They argue the gospel "changes us from the inside out" (p. 24) and, therefore, the church is called to go out with the gospel (part 3). In the section about the whole church, they cover worshipers, family, servants, disciples, and witnesses. They argue the gospel has changed the how and where of worship. There's a strong emphasis on missional worship (gathered vs. scattered) a point which I loved. They discuss the benefits of an explicit liturgy and connect that with our daily living (see chart A). I had never made this connection and found myself meditating on the implications. Consider how the liturgy of your church lends itself to strengthen your gospel living when scattered. In much of this section, the categories mentioned at the start of this paragraph are unpacked in terms of living the "resurrected life" (pp. 168-69) outside of the confines of the church. Living on mission.

Part 3 examines the different "locations" (loosely defined) where we live these truths out (home, work, recreation, restoration, and multiplication). After the relatively large amount of space spent on gospel and church, I felt this last section needed more. I wanted more from it. The content in it was good, but it could have been explored more fully.

Faithmapping is worth reading and reading well. The conversation surrounding the gospel isn't going anywhere so it's important we understand the different arguments being made and how they actually fit together. This book could be used with great results as a study for a group of elders. But it could also be used in a lay small group. The outline is precise which makes staying on track while reading easy. Plus the topics discussed are essential for Christian living and are presented in a way that lends themselves for in-depth discussion.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Helpful Resource for All Christians, March 1, 2013
By 
Zack Ford (Louisville, KY) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Daniel Montgomery, founding pastor of Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, KY, along with Mike Cosper, fellow founding pastor at Sojourn, have set out to write a book to help ordinary Christians with the dilemma they face when the Gospel transfers them "from the familiar territory of self-centered living into a glorious wilderness, a beautiful and strange place where we're invited to explore the wonders of who God is and what he's done" (12). They seek to give new and ordinary Christians a "map" to help them approach the vast terrain ahead of them, and the many competing voices vying for their allegiance. Neither of them would claim to have absolutely everything figured out, and they say that Faithmapping is their "attempt to lay out the lessons we've learned as we've tried, failed, and fallen in love with the gospel" (20).

This "map" is separated into 3 parts: (1) The Whole Gospel, (2) The Whole Church, and (3) The Whole World.

In part one, "The Whole Gospel," the authors zoom in and out on 3 different aspects of the Gospel, largely drawn from Tim Keller's work on the issue. The 3 different aspects that they identify are The Gospel of the Kingdom, The Gospel of the Cross, and The Gospel of Grace, which are explained in their own words as:

"Chapter 1 ("The Gospel of the Kingdom") argues that the gospel is a kingdom announcement, and it explores what the kingdom of God is, as well as the kingdoms that compete for our hearts and minds. Chapter 2 ("The Gospel of the Cross") argues that the gospel is the story of Jesus's life, death, and resurrection -- all that he did to pay the penalty for our sins. Chapter 3 ("The Gospel of Grace") argues that the gospel is a gift of grace, something that God accomplishes for us entirely by his own strength and power, not because we earned or deserved anything" (22).

In addition to these three aspects of the Gospel, they include a fourth chapter in part 1 on why we need this whole gospel and not a fragmented gospel that separates and emphasizes one of these aspects at the expense of the others. In my opinion, this was one of the most helpful and important chapters in the book!

After exploring what exactly the Gospel is, part 2, chapters 5-9, seeks to sketch out how this Gospel transforms our identity. They say that "what we do flows from who we are -- a gospel-formed people who are radically transformed" (23). They flesh this out in five different aspects of our new identity: Worshipers, family, servants, disciples, and witnesses, each aspect of our new identity constituting a chapter in part 2.

Finally, part 3 seeks to make a connection between our new identity in the Gospel with the world in which we live. We do not live in a bubble, separated from the rest of the world in a "holy huddle." Rather, we are workers, residents, students, etc. in the world in which we inhabit. This last part seeks to look at how our new identity formed by the whole Gospel is to bear witness to God's Gospel in the whole world.

So, what is the authors' goal is writing this book and emphasizing these 3 parts of their "map"?

"Faithmapping's goal is to show how the gospel, the church, and our mission are a coherent, organic, interrelated whole, rather than distinct, independent ideas. They inform and expand our understanding of each other, a whole gospel for a whole church on mission in the whole world" (26).

I think that this is a very helpful book that would be beneficial for Christians and pastors of all ages and experience. We are all prone to gravitate toward our "hobby horse," emphasizing one aspect of the Gospel, or one part of our new Gospel identity, to the exclusion of the others. It is always a good thing for us to consider whether or not we have overcorrected and swung the pendulum too far in one direction or the other. I think that Montgomery and Cosper's Faithmapping is a helpful guide to help us map out a whole Gospel for the whole Church to the whole world.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Bridges the Gaps That So Many Of Us Struggle With, February 7, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
Author Reif Larsen once said, "A map does not just chart, it unlocks and formulates meaning; it forms bridges between here and there, between disparate ideas that we did not know were previously connected." In the realm of Christianity there seems to be a confusion that draws believers in all different directions. Shouts of "Follow this truth!" and "No, that's not that important." or "This is what really matters!" seem to come from every church, denomination, and believer who thinks they have the answer to what our faith is all about. We are presented with countless different aspects of our faith, and are left to wonder why there is such a separation.

In their book, Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey, authors Daniel Montgomery and Mike Cosper have done a tremendous job of showing readers that even though there are different elements of our faith, each is part of a bigger picture, one in which all of these elements are bridged together. Instead of competing gospels, identities, or missions of the church, we see that the Bible presents them as facets of one beautiful faith, unlocking meaning that many of us may have missed in all of the confusion.

There are many things that I could say about this excellent and engaging book. It is an outstanding book in its vision for ministries but is also devotional in the way challenges readers on a personal level in their own faith. It has the power to drive you to your knees in repentance and then thrill your heart with the captivating image of a whole faith that we were made for. It is theologically rich in thought and practical in its direction for readers. In short, no matter who you are, there is something here for you and it is very good. I encourage you to give this book a try! If you do, read it with humility and an open heart. God's going to meet you in amazing ways.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Must Read For All Believers, January 25, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
I have stated before that I am a fan of the current gospel-centered movement that is going on in Evangelical circles. I will restate that fact today. I am also a fan of a recent trend to bring a wholistic approach to this movement as seen in books by Kevin DeYoung, Greg Gilbert, and others. This book by Montgomery and Cosper is one of the most recent of those books.

The concept tackled in this book, the Gospel should inform and direct the whole of our our life, is not new or revolutionary. However it seems to have been somehow left out of the current gospel infused discussions. That is the starting point for the authors in this book.

Daniel Montgomery and Mike Cosper are both pastors at Sojourn Community Church in Louisville, Kentucky. As the explore this issue of letting the Gospel direct your life they draw on their experience from planting Sojourn and pastoring there. They also draw from popular culture quite well. I think this is one of the strengths of the books and an aspect that increases the readability of the material. They also expound on scripture, in fact this is the starting place for all of their points, as it should be. They supplement this with input from quite a few leading pastors and theologians, such as John Ortberg, Dallas Willard, Tim Keller, and others. The result of all of this is a book that is clear in its direction and very readable. Now this does not mean the concepts in the book are easy to live out. No, letting the Gospel take hold of all of your life is a struggle, that is why Paul uses the imagery of fighting the fight of faith and tells us to work out our faith with fear and trembling. So putting to practice these things will be a challenge but Montgomery and Cosper have written a book that should help you along the way. I encourage you to read this book, but to not just read it, rather pray through and journal as you go along.

I received this book in from the publisher, Crossway, for the purpose of review with no requirement to write a positive review.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A good, simple vision of the Gospel and the Church, November 4, 2013
This review is from: Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey (Paperback)
The notes which not litter the pages of my copy of Faithmapping provide a strong indication of my opinion of the book: “interesting,” “great analogy,” “ha- great metaphor,” “good point,” “yes,” and so on. In our culture of celebrity pastors and “making many books,” this work is a needed and refreshing look at what it means to be the church in light of the Gospel.
If you want to add a few people to your congregation, it seems that you only need to start adding the word “Gospel” to things. But as Daniel Montgomery and Mike Cosper show, if you press in to what people mean when they talk about the gospel, you will not likely get a clear answer and you will certainly find among a variety of people a variety of responses that often compete with one another.

The book is organized around the proposition that the Church is to see the whole Gospel transform the whole person and the whole world. The gospel is seen through three lenses: the Kingdom, the Cross, and Grace, and the church is lived out in five identities: servants, disciples, witnesses, family, and worshipers.

I found this book insightful, but perhaps the best thing about the book is its clarity and simplicity. So many competing voices claim to have discovered what the gospel is all about. It can be dizzying and in this cacophony of voices, these authors say “yes” the Gospel is about that. The gospel is not all about the Kingdom, the Cross, or Grace, but it encompasses all of the above, and each aspect flows seamlessly into the other. I have said that it is an insightful book but I wonder if the authors regret that it even needed to be written. It is simply a call to move away from the silver bullet notion that we have discovered the “true” gospel toward the simple Gospel, as revealed by God in His scripture.

This book will either illuminate your understanding of the Gospel and the Church or it will edify you and build up your faith. Either way, any Christian will do well to read this book. Notwithstanding, I have a couple critiques. It is well written and engaging, but the sporadic bits that relate the concepts to some pop culture phenomena seem ad hoc. They are good in themselves (and they are a helpful tool for pastors who want to use pop culture to diagnose the heart of culture- without being silly) but they are too irregular to flow nicely as an inherent part of the work. Secondly, the fist bit that deals with the Gospel in three parts is by far the best section of the book. The section on the identities is good as well but it seemed like the authors were either rushed for time or limited by publisher (I might guess the latter since I have several books from this publisher which are identical in size and length.) And the section on the whole world seems like an afterthought. I would have liked each section to have the weight of the first.
Nonetheless, this is a great work that I hope will begin to influence the thinking of church leadership and Christians in a way that changes church culture in the west from one of consumption and pet issues to one that seeks to glorify God by taking the whole gospel to the whole person to the whole world.
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Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey
Faithmapping: A Gospel Atlas for Your Spiritual Journey by Mike Cosper (Paperback - January 31, 2013)
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