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Faker Paperback – March 5, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Vertigo (March 5, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1401216633
  • ISBN-13: 978-1401216634
  • Product Dimensions: 6.7 x 0.4 x 10.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.1 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #612,076 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In his first collection, Gaskin struts his stuff in more forms than many a comics artist does these days, including one-panel gags, four-panel strips, six-panel one-pagers, several-page stories, and sketchbook outtakes, funny and not. (The only veteran cartoonist who regularly offers as much variety is Sam Henderson, whose latest Magic Whistle collection, Body Armor for Your Dignity, is reviewed in this issue.) Silliness and pop-cultural referentiality inform virtually everything Gaskin does, sometimes rather complexly. “Speedy Beepy” requires familiarity with (1) the picture-book convention of anthropomorphizing machines, (2) claims made about biodiesel fuel, and (3) the perception of environmental greens and sixties hippies as birds of a feather. “My Kinski” is so quirky and daft that appreciating it doesn’t depend on knowing the Werner Herzog films that inspired it, though such knowledge still helps. Employing the deliberately crude drawing manners of alternative cartoonists from S. Clay Wilson to Lynda Barry and displaying a sensibility poised somewhere between Wilson’s ludicrous obscenity and Barry’s laughing to keep from crying, Gaskin’s a talent to watch. --Ray Olson

Review

"* "I really have no idea what Faker is going to become... but whatever it is, it'll be blazing a new trail, it will be relentless, and I will be reading it. You should be too." - BinaryCulture.net * "...Carey's story telling charisma and Jock's beautiful drawing, this is something you can't miss!" Comic-Art.org * "An entertaining read" - PulpFictionOnline" --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

Customer Reviews

2.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By S. Robert Katz on May 10, 2008
Format: Paperback
i essentially agree with the other review here. i like mike carey a lot, but this was a rare miss for him. it's strictly "ok," not bad but nothing special. there's a somewhat interesting idea that's a major theme and pops up explicitly in a few places (the last page, for one), but it's just not enough. the characters are basically flat, and the pacing was peculiar, but i think that was a result of the bizarre (not necessarily in a good way) turn the plot took. jock's not at the top of his game either. i normally like his art quite a lot, but there just wasn't much here for him to sink his teeth into. some great looking covers (as usual), but otherwise not much to look at. this is probably a 2.5 star book, might appeal more to someone else, but i was disappointed. did like the last page tho, which helps, but i can't really recommend this.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By J.D. on May 15, 2008
Format: Paperback
Mike Carey (Hellblazer) and Eisner-nominated artist Jock (The Losers) tell a tale of disaffected college youth that's equal parts Bret Easton Ellis and Philip K. Dick.

A group of housemates made up of shallow, exploitative people return from winter break and get really trashed at a party. When they wake up, suddenly they find that no one else seems to remember their roommate Nick. Questions of identity, memory, and existence itself soon wreak havoc as the roommates wrestle with their unraveling lives.

If you're willing to go with some of the more far-fetched plot turns, there is a core idea here that hits on very vital issues at a sometimes overwhelming time in one's life.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer VINE VOICE on June 9, 2008
Format: Paperback
Inexplicable but surprisingly strong Vertigo one-off.

Difficult to describe (partially because I'm still a bit confused), but Carey does a good job making four utterly reprehensible protagonists into empathetic figures.

The strange bio-nano-psycho-technology at the core of the story exists mostly as an excuse for Carey to do what he wants. Although there are a myriad of twists and turns, it is hard to muster a sense of surprise when there's no initial normality.

The book is supported by solid, but not great art by Jock - I really liked the dyamic layouts more than the pictures within them. And, unlike some of the other reviewers, I love the cover...
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By jaa43 on May 7, 2008
Format: Paperback
Carey, who happens to be a pretty good storyteller, missed the mark on this one. Carey doesn't do a good job of making the reader feel empathetic towards the protagonists, which is crucial, especially since the characters are not likable to begin with. Additionaly, the story and plot twists were predictable and mediocre at best.
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Format: Paperback
This was really awful. I got this thinking that this book would delve heavily into both philosophy and psychology. It slightly touches these subjects (existentialism), but it doesn't come off as interesting at all. Furthermore Carey tries to explore how and why we put on masks in order to adjust to social situations. However, this done quite poorly.

The characters one-dimensional and come off as completely self centered douches from the start till the end. Not once do you feel for any of the characters.

Stay away from this book it is a waste of time.
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