The Fall of the Asante Empire and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$0.25
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very good condition book with only light signs of previous use. Sail the Seas of Value.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fall of the Asante Empire: The Hundred-Year War for Africa's Gold Coast Hardcover – February 1, 1995


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$57.40 $0.24

The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs
The Fangirl's Guide to the Galaxy by Sam Maggs
It’s never been a better time to be a girl geek. Learn more | See all by author

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

If the Zulu-British battle in 1879 is the best-known conflict between African colonizer and colonist, the longest war was between the British and the Asante of what is today Ghana, from 1807 to 1900. As UCLA anthropologist Edgerton (Like Lions They Fought) shows in this detailed excavation of sources, the war makes a resonant story. The Asante had created a national identity and deep patriotism, despite dependence on recent conquests and slaves, thus making them a formidable foe. Edgerton writes with respect but does not idealize a people capable, like their foes, of brutality. He recounts a succession of conflicts and delineates the workings of the Asante state, the ambitions and tactics of the invaders and numerous anecdotes from the field of battle. His conclusion: though the Asante mostly wanted peace, the British?even after years of contact with them?could not comprehend Asante values or history, and never had any intention of sharing power on the Gold Coast.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From Library Journal

While most people are aware of the British wars against the Zulus, many are not as aware of the British campaign against the Asante empire of what is now the West African nation of Ghana. Edgerton (anthropology and psychology, UCLA) has written a book for general readers that details the military and cultural clash between these two peoples. Based on secondary sources and travelers' accounts of the time (19th century), the text is full of fascinating narratives and anecdotes from both sides, which makes for easy and fun reading. Although many books have been written on this general topic, most are either more academically oriented or broader in scope. History buffs-especially military buffs-will enjoy this book.
Paul H. Thomas, Hoover Inst. Lib., Stanford, Cal.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 293 pages
  • Publisher: Free Press; First Edition edition (February 1, 1995)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0029089263
  • ISBN-13: 978-0029089262
  • Product Dimensions: 1.2 x 6.5 x 9.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #756,910 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
5 star
5
4 star
2
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 7 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By m_noland on November 8, 2000
Format: Hardcover
For centuries the Ghana nee the Gold Coast nee the Ashanti kingdom has been a major producer of gold. The 16th century arrival of European powers on the West African coast opened up vast new trading opportunities. The Europeans tried to push inland to locate the source of the gold, while the Ashantis tried to subjugate the coastal dwelling Fantes who intermediated the trade between the seafaring Europeans and the Ashanti and other inland groups.
This book describes the 100 years on-again off-again war between the British (and their Fante allies) and the Ashanti (supported by the Dutch). The author is an anthropologist and his intepretation of events emphasizes the cross-cultural incomprehension of two societies (Victorian Britain, and late Ashanti Empire) which in some ways were remarkably similar: aristocratic, hierarchical, chauvinistic, imperialistic, militaristic. Some of the stories are fascinating as in the depressing case of the British kidnapping and torture of an Ashanti peace emissary which predictably leads to Ashanti mobilization and the seige of the British castle at Cape Coast. Or the fact that it takes 70 years for the British to figure out that desertions by the Fante were less motivated by cowardice than the fact that the British were forcing their Fante porters to do culturally innappropriate "women's work." Nevertheless, the author clearly likes both the British and the Ashanti, so he makes constant references to the "cowardly" "perfidious" etc. Fante. What the Ashanti could not do, malaria and dysentary did (they don't call West Africa "White Man's Grave" for nothing) and in the end, the British need howitzers and Yoruba troops brought in from Nigeria to capture the Ashanti capital of Kumasi.
Read more ›
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Tim F. Martin on December 27, 2007
Format: Paperback
_The Fall of the Asante Empire_ by Robert B. Edgerton is a rather engaging book that can be read on several levels. It is an account of one of the last existing preliterate sub-Saharan African civilizations, the author providing speculation and first-hand contemporary accounts of one of the most noteworthy and powerful non-European civilizations of West Africa. As one might imagine it is also a vivid, detailed, and exhaustive (though certainly not tedious) tale of the various cold and hot wars that broke out between an ambitious, imperialistic British Empire and a sometimes bellicose but often surprisingly peace-loving native civilization, a tale filled with bravery, treachery, humor, and tragedy, of an African state that though locally quite powerful was increasingly aware of the growing disparity in military might between the two civilizations. It is also an interesting study in international affairs; one filled with failed peace attempts, misread intentions, and missed opportunities for peace.

The Zulus are with good reason both during the 19th century and today a highly respected example of the military power, success, and bravery of native African armed forces, one that for a time prevailed against a much more powerful British Empire, its flamboyantly dressed and clearly very brave warriors capturing the imaginations of many Westerners. The author though laments that for many Americans and Europeans recognition of the valor and success of the African fighting men begins and ends with the Zulus.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Ckek on July 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Excellent work here by the author, who writes with no bias, as we come to understand it in the modern text. Both sides are described for better and worse, warts and all. Slavery it seems practiced by the great African kingdoms all over Africa, is not something I remember being taught in school here in the US.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By water50 on May 20, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Interesting Information about the ashanty tribe and additionally
better understanding about the colonialism in and of africa.
The term gold coast is also better understood.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again