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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 2nd album since freedom. Keep it up
Okay, first off in response to the other review..I stopped being surprised with what you were saying once I saw you mention CoB and BfmV on a Burzum review....New Bodom is trash. Anyway, enough about that. This album continues in the style heard on "Belus." I happened to be a big fan of Belus. This album is by no means a sellout. It keeps the same production that Burzum...
Published on March 24, 2011 by Balberith

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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It Could Have Been Great
First off, I'm not a Varg apologist as many seem to be. I don't think he's a folk hero, just a far better than average musician who makes questionable choices at times, both in and out of the studio.

As with Belus, Fallen starts with a directionless opening track leading into the first actual song. Unlike Belus, which had the clinking noise serving as the...
Published on April 26, 2011 by B. Meyer


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25 of 27 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars 2nd album since freedom. Keep it up, March 24, 2011
This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
Okay, first off in response to the other review..I stopped being surprised with what you were saying once I saw you mention CoB and BfmV on a Burzum review....New Bodom is trash. Anyway, enough about that. This album continues in the style heard on "Belus." I happened to be a big fan of Belus. This album is by no means a sellout. It keeps the same production that Burzum has always had. Varg keeps with his ascending and descending minor chords that he's known for to create that dark feel. Don't look for any mind blowing riffs, but if you've ever listened to Burzum, you should already know not to look for that. The atmosphere in this album is great. Varg adds more spoken word parts and a little singing than was present on Belus, but the vocals he has adopted since Filosofem are still prevalent for the majority. I think I like this album better than Belus because there are more songs here that are new, whereas Belus had a rehashed song from Daudi Baldrs and an old Uruk-Hai song. This album, to my knowledge, is never before heard material. Waiting for my copy to come in the mail so I can listen to it by candlelight. If you are a Burzum fan, and not some elitist jackass, there should be no problem for you to listen to this album. The self titled album is still my favorite, of course, but this is still 100% true Norwegian black metal.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Solid Work; More of One Piece than Belus, April 6, 2011
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Old T.B. (Cheyenne, Wy USA) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Fallen (MP3 Music)
The most recent musical offering from Varg Vikernes, Fallen, has been released about one year after its predecessor, Belus. How does it compare in the Burzum catalog? Quite favorably, actually.

Fallen begins with a more ominous ambient opener than Belus; it sets the tone for the rest of the album. Fallen is, in some ways, Burzum as it has come to be known: dark music with repeated motifs. It is this musical approach that has served Varg Vikernes well, and this is not a complaint.

Fallen is different, too, particularly in the vocals. Mr. Vikernes revisits the spoken word and guttural singing displayed on Belus; in fact, these two stylings dominate the album. There are some "clean" vocals on the album's high point, and longest number, "Budstikken," that are quite appropriate and welcome.

Fallen does not necessarily leap out of the speakers the way some Burzum releases have. That notwithstanding, it is a solid, cohesive set; all of the songs work quite well together as one piece of music. It is also quite welcome to have Fallen end with one of Varg Vikernes's ambient pieces; this aspect of his music was sorely missed on Belus.

For anyone who likes dark and profound music, Fallen is a recommended listen. Here's to the continued productivity of Varg Vikernes.
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Burzum, either you get it or you don't, either you enjoy it or you do not., December 13, 2011
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This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
The music here is is more so of what there was back in those days (1992-1994) than most of the releases being tossed out there at current times. You will see people crying about the lack of progression or how it is more or less the same. It is black metal, it is Burzum, progression you will not find here, if people had any idea of the nature of black metal or the sound and direction in general perhaps there would be a sort of understanding of what the artist was bringing into being and the atmosphere and feeling of the music that is being represented. There is supposed to be a gritty, dirty, cavernous sound. The production is supposed to be awkward or sound a little off or thin.It is intentional in most cases. I shouldn't even have to explain that.
The music in general is supposed to be "necro" with a dark, gloomy, epic, atmosphere, once in a while theres the anger filled, and proud moments, sometimes almost claustrophobic, often Satanic. But if done the right way it will keep you listening and have your attention for the duration of the CD or Vinyl. All that is here, minus the Satanic parts, and on Belus as well. Burzum is Burzum,Like anything else, you either like it or do not. Realistically nothing has really changed here. He has basically just picked up where his music left off be for being put into Prison. Maybe the themes are slightly different, but musically, if this was released anytime right after Det Som Engang Var - Filosofem, it would fit just as well, not only with that, but within all the other releases of that time period as well. If you enjoy Burzum, your in luck, here like Belus, you will find another solid classic Burzum title that dose not suffer from modern trends. I give it a 5/5 for what it is, and how it is. Not for the man, but for the music he creates.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Further evolution of Burzum, November 11, 2011
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This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
I've been listening to "Fallen" since it came out eight months ago, and while I did not like it all that much at first it has grown on me tremendously. I really love the post-prison Burzum releases....the songwriting is more focused, mature, and intricate....the playing is more disciplined, tighter, more dextrous. "Fallen" exemplifies this even more than last year's "Belus", while still retaining that undeniable Burzum sound.

To start with, the production is by far the cleanest and clearest of Burzum releases. At first this was a major turn-off for me, but over time I've grown to love it so much that I wish "Belus" had the same clear production. Varg often has several layers of guitar and bass interweaving, and it is great to hear the details and nuance of his playing. The production also brings out the vocals more, which is especially noticeable during the parts with both clean and harsh vocals.

The songwriting is rather unlike "Belus", perhaps most like "Det Som Engang Var", but really it's own new precedent in the Burzum catalog. Song structures are more varied than previous albums, yet still retain the long-form trance-like quality Burzum is known for. The multi-layered guitar approach is more prevalent than ever before, although this may be a perception caused by the clean production. I really love the clean vocals....they combine perfectly with the harsh vocals, and sound great on their own as well. They are particularly interesting during Vanvidd, where they are multitracked and sometimes forward in the mix, other times submerged in the mix....like some haunting thought of madness rising and falling in the unconscious. As always, the bass playing is interesting and adds much to the songwriting...sometimes just holding down the low-end, other times providing crucial counterpoint to the melodic guitars. The drums, as always, are minimalist, simple, but effective.

I really love "Belus" for being a concept album, telling the full cycle of winter/rebirth/spring. "Fallen" feels comparatively less cohesive, although it could well be that I have not yet grasped the concept of the album. It certainly holds together as an album, but I have not yet found a narrative thread, if one exists. Of course, alienation, loneliness, death, and the old forgotten ways are a constant staple of Burzum lyrics.

I would most definitely recommend this album. It will not please people stuck in Burzum's past, it will not please commercial black metal fans, it will not please those who are caught up in their own ideas about what black metal means blah blah blah. This is not black metal. It is not for everyone, nor even for very many. But for those whom it is meant for, "Fallen" is a welcome place to feel at home.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Traditional Black Metal in it's purest form., July 3, 2011
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This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
The one thing I like about this album, and this goes for all Burzum albums, is how Varg creates the dark atmospheres that engulf the listener right from the beginning. The music has feeling, if you don't feel it when you listen to it, you might want to check your pulse to see if you're actually alive! It's simple, raw, and unrelenting, just the way black metal should be! Jeg Faller is definitely my favorite track on the album, I advise anyone who likes real Black Metal at it's finest to buy this album and stop wasting your money on overproduced imitation Black Metal from Dimmu Borgir and Cradle of Filth.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars No Comprimise, April 6, 2011
This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
This album is everything that makes Burzum great. While most of his Norwegian counterparts have long since gone commercial and made their cash grabs, Varg stands firm to what Burum has always stood for. His sound is still innovative yet minimalistic. Love him or hate him, this is another masterpiece!
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4.0 out of 5 stars A more sophisticated Burzum., September 22, 2014
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This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
"The sound is more dynamic – we mastered the album as if it was classical music. . . "
-Varg Vikernes
The above statement holds much water with me when I reflect on this album that I could not help but post the quote. This album truly is energetic, forceful, and has the air of a classical piece. Beyond that you, you still have the black metal side that made Burzum as legendary as it is. While not having the extremely lo-fi production, intentionally bad equipment, or even the hellish screams of anguish from Varg himself; this album is still very much raw and black metal by its own standards. The best way to explain the difference in feeling between the old era and new era for Burzum (for me, personally) is with an analogy about a man in solitude.
Old Burzum is the man living in solitude due to his contempt and utter hatred for the world. There are very raw, violent feelings involved.
New Burzum is the man living in solitude due to the fact that he knows he does not live among others well, and he is very much content with that.
To go back to the music, old Burzum is raw, anger filled violence with an air of mysticism. While the new material is very much more sophisticated and artistic in its' endeavors. It's more controlled and poetic.
To me, both of the eras are beautiful for different reasons, yet I see them both coming from the same place, just only with a new perspective. That is really what this album is, another Burzum album like the beloved first four, but with a new perspective. The rawness, the hypnotic instrumentation, and the screeching vocals-- though to a lesser extent-- are still there, but coming to you in a different way.

Fra verdenstreet (From the World Tree) starts off the album as an ambient track with hissing whispers throughout to set the mood for what you are about to experience. Like most intro tracks, it could very easily be ignored by itself, but as a part of the whole album it works wonders.

The next five tracks: Jeg Faller, Valen, Vanvidd, Enhver Til Sitt, and Bidstikken make up the meat of the album. There is not much need to go into full detail of each track since they are very much similar in that they all contain the memorable riffs; the vocals that switch between screams, whispers, and spoken word; and hypnotically infectious melodies.

Then comes the closing, and second ambient track of the album, Til Hel Og Tilbake Igjen. Much like how the intro gets you in the mood for the album, this track slowly weens you off into the silence for when the album comes to it's closing. That silence that comes after is great for reflecting upon the album and how you perceived it.
Much like the rest of this review, that last statement might come off as some over-acting attempt to seem deep. In all honesty though, I had this album and many others on my MP3 player, and upon finishing the album I could not bring myself to start the Cannibal Corpse album that I planned to listen to next. Instead I sat in silence and wrote this review in my head. To me, that shows that this is very powerful music and why I have a love for Burzum.

Now, why did I rate it four stars instead of five despite all my romanticized praising? In all honestly, this does not come off as an album that one can listen to constantly. It's very much one to take off the shelf every few months and remember why you loved it in the first place. Along with that, like most of Burzum's catalog, some songs can last a little too long for their own good. I can definitely see how a person would get annoyed with anything of the five middle songs if this was the only thing they were focusing on.
Outside of those minor complaints, this album is a true work of art and worth the money in my opinion.
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5.0 out of 5 stars More Burzum brilliance, July 25, 2014
This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
Burzum's eighth opus, 2011's "Fallen," continues in a manner very similar to the one heard on their last full-length, 2010's "Belus." One might even say it picks up right where that excellent return-to-form left off in that it does have a few forays into darkly ominous melodic territory, but it is first and foremost a brutal, blasting black metal affair, and one that is layered in sharp, biting guitar chops, pummeling drums, and demonic-sounding vocal rasps.

Varg Vikernes again handles all of the instrumental, vocal, and lyrical duties himself, and even though he might not exactly reinvent himself, here, he once again has proved to the world that he has clearly mastered the art of multi-instrumentalism. And his songwriting is great, too, as not only are these seven songs terrifically epic and inventive, but they are also peppered with just enough innovation and curveballs to keep things thoroughly interesting. Plus, there is some material present, here, that finds the man slightly stepping outside of his comfort zone and taking his band's creativity to a new level. (See track three, "Valen," among others, for proof of this fact.)

"Fallen" begins in a manner very similar to the way "Belus" began, with a foreboding little intro track ("Fra Verdenstreet") that clocks in at just passed the one-minute mark, before really getting the ball rolling with the subsequent epic "Jeg Faller." This nearly eight-minute-long composition is primarily comprised of memorably droning guitar riffs, pummeling, hyper-speed blast beats, and menacing, unnervingly creepy vocals that switch back and forth between brutal, croak-y growling, and creepy spoken word dialogue. Next we have the aforementioned "Valen," which is an even greater epic still, this one clocking in at a relatively uncomfortable nine-minutes and change. And fueled by a coarse, chugging guitar lick and death metal-tinged growls, it is one abrasive bugger lemme tell ya!

Skipping ahead a tad, "Enhver Til Sitt" might be a decisively more groove-oriented venture that is primarily centered around a droning and repetitive, Darkthrone-ish riff; but it is immediately offset by the blistering "Vanvidd," a heads-down, circle-pit-stoking bludgeon that explodes with scalding guitars, mind-boggling black metal drum blasts, and retching black metal vocals. As such, "Vanvidd" is made into a much more accessible-than-most song, and a traditional black metal assault, even though it, too, is well over seven whole minutes in length.

But the last two remaining tracks on the album again find Burzum exploring their highly experimental roots, with the first being the set's indisputable highpoint and epic, "Budstikken." It is ten minutes and ten seconds (on the dot) of solid, if repetitive and circular guitar riffing, beeping bass lines, swirling melodies, and seriously grim vocals. And the second of these two mentioned tunes is "Til Hel Og Tilbake Igjen," which plays like a piece of almost pure percussion, as it is, essentially, a six-minute-long drum solo where a really reverberating and dexterous drum fill lays the foundation for a whispered, echoing-out vocal line. Together, these two things combine to form a portentously ambient vibe that is all-but guaranteed to send a shot of frigidity throughout every last inch of your body.

As you can see, "Fallen" finds Burzum staggering their sheer, aural aggression with streaks of placid experimentation. The end result is a sound that is simultaneously white-hot and bone-chilling. And not only that, but it is topped off by an excellent production job, too. Super raw and abrasive yet articulate enough to discern instruments, the production values achieved, here, are pretty much ideal for any black metal album. It all makes for one piece of music that is, quite simply and for all intents and purposes, a very fine slab of extreme metal from a band that is indisputably continuing to fire on all cylinders.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars It Could Have Been Great, April 26, 2011
By 
B. Meyer (Minneapolis, MN) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
First off, I'm not a Varg apologist as many seem to be. I don't think he's a folk hero, just a far better than average musician who makes questionable choices at times, both in and out of the studio.

As with Belus, Fallen starts with a directionless opening track leading into the first actual song. Unlike Belus, which had the clinking noise serving as the forging of the blade used to kill Belus, the intro on Fallen seemingly has no point. The five actual songs on Fallen range from just short of brilliant (Jeg Faller and Valen) to decent (Enhver til Sitt - starts out very promising but doesn't really leave the initial theme or have much structure and Budstikken which probably would have been better at 8 minutes long with a bit more focus) to "you're proud enough of this as a piece of music to release it on an album?" (Vanvidd - it just doesn't go anywhere and doesn't have a resolution). Then we get a completely aimless outro clocking just short of 6 minutes.

Production wise, Fallen sounds very similar to Belus. The guitars are quite clear albeit thin sounding, the bass is present but nothing more than a hint of the instrument and the drum sound is virtually identical with the cymbals being a touch brighter.

Had more time been given to writing the album I'm sure we'd have another classic or two in there, instead there isn't any cohesive point. I can certainly appreciate trying to do something different and new within the rather myopic scope of "raw black metal" but it seems that Varg himself isn't fully convinced of what he's doing at certain times on Fallen. All in all, it's good, better than most but not great which is what I expected. As a black metal album trying to do something a bit different, I'd give it 4/5 stars. However, as a Burzum album it's 2/5 stars, average those out for the 3/5 ranking.
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5.0 out of 5 stars Great album!, August 9, 2013
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This review is from: Fallen (Audio CD)
Burzum's Fallen has a very folky/old school school black metal sound, but with superb production.
It starts with the intro track "Fra Verdenstreet", which sounds like wind blowing and water droplets falling inside a cave. Then it hits you with the song "Jeg Faller", which is full of very "cold" and sad sounding riffs, like the one at 2:33, and especially the riffs at 4:48, all the way to the 6:00 minute mark.
The next track, "Valen" has very melodic guitars, and has a chorus sung with clean, melodic vocals, and the other parts of the song have spoken vocals and raspy growls.
The next track is "Vanvidd" and is one of the heavier songs in the album. The drums are repetitive, but they sound really good. Halfway through the song, Varg howls and screams like a madman, and it sounds amazing. The power chords played by the rhythm guitar are very crunchy and awesome.
Then we have "Enhver Til Sitt", which has a lot of tremolo picked riffs and some cool vocal patterns.
"Budstikken" starts out with a pounding drum beat and cold sounding riffs, and has a lot of melancholic riffs throughout the song. The clean vocals are amazing, and add a lot to the atmosphere of thesong.
The final track is called "Til Hel Og Tilbake Igjen" which is an instrumental track, it starts with a slow pounding drum beat, then continues on with eerie sound effects and vocals, the drums start up again, then it ends with a gloomy, discordant acoustic riff.
I think this album is great for any fan of old school black metal. Although the production isn't lo-fi, the songs on this album sound like old-school black metal, somewhat like Varg's album entitled "FIlosofem", but with really good production.
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Fallen
Fallen by Burzum (Audio CD - 2011)
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