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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very appropriate title
Even though I've heard many of the classic Sonny Rollins recordings (e.g. "Saxophone Colossus"), I still consider this my favorite. For one, I find it hard to believe how a man who must have been over 60 at the time of the recording could play with so much drive and passion. He sounds very strong on this recording. Moreover his supporting cast seems equally up...
Published on February 15, 2002 by Todd Ebert

versus
3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Saxophone Colostomy?
Tenor Badness? Sorry, couldn't resist :-)
This disc doesn't suck, but that's as glowing as my praise will get. Taken in
a vacuum, it does have a few high points, including some really nice interplay
with Branford Marsalis. In short, if this record were by an unknown, I'd
describe it as misguided attempt by an artist who has potential. However,...
Published on March 8, 2003 by Bruce J. Morton


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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars very appropriate title, February 15, 2002
By 
Todd Ebert (Long Beach California) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Falling in Love With Jazz (Audio CD)
Even though I've heard many of the classic Sonny Rollins recordings (e.g. "Saxophone Colossus"), I still consider this my favorite. For one, I find it hard to believe how a man who must have been over 60 at the time of the recording could play with so much drive and passion. He sounds very strong on this recording. Moreover his supporting cast seems equally up to the challenge. While the two duets with Branford Marsalis cannot get any more soulful, the guitar work of Jerome Harris is quite impressive on "Tennessee Waltz" and "Sister", while DeJohnette, Cranshaw, and Soskin provide their usual outstanding rhythm support. My favorite track however might be "Little Girl Blue", for Rollins' incredible solo work and the beautiful rhythm support of Harris' guitar and Soskin's piano work: simply beautiful. Finally I very much enjoy the different blends of sounds on this recording, in that one can hear bits of country, New Orleans, blues, and rock (check out Jack's drumming on "Amanda").
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars One of Rollins better efforts, March 10, 2009
By 
Clearly, every cut on this LP can't be rated a 5. When listening to the interplay between Rollins and Branford Marsalis on "I Should Care", magic happens everytime. That tune is in the top three jazz ballads involving two sax players I've heard in over 40 years of listening to jazz. Better than "You Don't What Love Is" from Rollin's LP "Saxophone Colussus". Rollins solo on "Little Girl Blue" (where he is unaccompanied by Marsalis) is just another incredible virtuoso performance. It is as though Rollins was motivated by the "young lion" Marsalis' presense at this set. The other tunes are nicely performed (maybe 4 out of 5 on average). The two ballads: 10 each.
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5.0 out of 5 stars A Somewhat Unexpectedly Good Latter Day Sonny Rollins Release, March 15, 2012
This review is from: Falling in Love With Jazz (Audio CD)
Sonny Rollins had spent the better part of the 1980's pursuing ways in which to mildly introduce electric elements into an essentially acoustic jazz framework. For the most part,these elements were not prominent and the average music listener would probably have to strain to notice it was there. Electric jazz/fusion by that point had developed something of a stigma among acoustic jazz lovers. Especially with the advent of the "young lions". By the time the decade came to a close,it did seem about the right time for all of the sub-genre's of to co exist in a reasonable way. Not sure if that happened. But many artists did try to bridge that gap. And that seems to be just what Sonny tries to do here.

Recorded over what appears to be three separate sessions in the summer/autumn of 1989,with three different sets of musicians this album has a very strong progression about it. On "For All We Know" and "I Should Care" Sonny and Branford Marsalis engage in a couple spirited tenor duets,both on the slower and melodic side. On "Tennessee Waltz" and "Little Girl Blue" Jack DeJohneete is on drums and especially on the former number Jerome Harris's electric guitar actually give the music a mild country-western flavor. After all since that genre is actually about as close to the blues as jazz is that isn't very surprising either. On "Falling In Love With Love" the "third band with only Clifton Davis on trombone as the main instrumental difference is a spirited uptempo number. On the final two featuring that same band,namely "Sister" and "Amanda" Bob Crenshaw's bass pops right out on two heavy duty jazz-funk type numbers.

Interesting thing about this album is how well Sonny himself is about to make himself right at home with whatever is happening around him. And this album does have a good deal of variety in it to be said. I'd think that is was good that a musician of his era would be the person to make a record like this one. A lot of people of earlier and later eras did in fact tend to get a little stuck in certain ways of making music. Louis Armstrong,for example was no fan of be-bop nor were any of the be-boppers a fan of his. Could've been,as the old saying went,that the heroin epidemic among many of the be-boppers "took a lot of the love away". On the other hand everyone from Miles Davis,John Coltrane,Dizzy Gillespie and Sonny Rollins here were all able to more successfully adapt their sounds to the changes of the decades in a manner only really Duke Ellington had before them. And to my ears this album and others like it are a very good example of this.
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Saxophone Colostomy?, March 8, 2003
By 
Bruce J. Morton "teapotkid" (Rochester, NY United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Falling in Love With Jazz (Audio CD)
Tenor Badness? Sorry, couldn't resist :-)
This disc doesn't suck, but that's as glowing as my praise will get. Taken in
a vacuum, it does have a few high points, including some really nice interplay
with Branford Marsalis. In short, if this record were by an unknown, I'd
describe it as misguided attempt by an artist who has potential. However, with
Sonny's name on the cover, we're playing a whole different game, and the
expectations are higher. The disc starts out sounding reasonably fresh, but
becomes successively more overproduced as it progresses, sliding dangerously
close to the type of slick gloss that labels like GRP churn out. None of the tracks do
anything to move me emotionally one way or the other - even worse, I'm a fan of
Tennessee Waltz in a country context, but to my ears it goes down here about
as well as ketchup on ice cream. While I've been a serious music listener since
the late '70s, I'm no jazz expert. I just know what I like, and this isn't it.
The man who gave us Saxophone Colossus, Tenor Madness, and figured
prominently in the epic Bags Groove sessions is capable of far better. See Sonny's
2000 release "This is What I Do" for a higher quality display of his recent work.
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Falling in Love With Jazz
Falling in Love With Jazz by Sonny Rollins (Audio CD - 1990)
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