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Falling Out of Time (Vintage International) Kindle Edition

4.3 out of 5 stars 23 customer reviews

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Length: 210 pages Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

*Starred Review* With a strange and wonderful tale, Grossman challenges the boundaries separating life from death, sanity from madness. Announcing I have to go, a grief-stricken Israeli villager takes leave of his bewildered wife, embarking on a journey to there—an impossibly undefined place where he hopes to find and to speak with his dead son. As he sets out walking, in ever-widening circles around his village, the Walking Man becomes a Pied Piper of Bereavement, drawing behind him the Midwife, the Net-Mender, the Elderly Math Teacher, the Duke—all staggering under loads of sadness due to the loss of a loved one. Even the Town Chronicler—who narrates the bizarre quest—joins his distraught wife in the company following the Walking Man into a dreamscape where the deepest fears stirred by death collide with the most passionate hopes for life. Together these grim marchers unfold a dark colloquy—by turns heartrending and comforting—on what it means to love the departed, what it means to accept—or defy—death. Intensifying the pathos, deepening the soul-searching, husbands and wives repeatedly struggle to preserve their union despite sharply contrasting ways of dealing with their shared loss. A potent fusion of poetry, fiction, and drama sweeps readers into very deep waters! --Bryce Christensen

Review

Praise for David Grossman:
 • "There are some writers in whose words one recognizes the texture of life. David Grossman is such a writer." -- Yann Martel

Praise for To the End of the Land:
 • "A beautiful, complicated, heartbreaking masterpiece." -- National Post
 • "Utterly engrossing; it is filled with original and unexpected detail about domestic life, about the shapes and shadows that surround love and memory, and about the sharp and desperate edges of loss and fear." -- Colm Toibin, The New York Times Book Review front cover
 • "This is a book of overwhelming power and intensity. . . . Wrenching, beautiful, unforgettable." -- Paul Auster
 • "A boundary-pushing novel. . . . Like all great literature, it is an act of generosity, opening itself to every human possibility." -- Washington Post

Product Details

  • File Size: 2558 KB
  • Print Length: 210 pages
  • Publisher: Vintage (March 25, 2014)
  • Publication Date: March 25, 2014
  • Sold by: Random House LLC
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B00FIN0T50
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #162,331 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
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More About the Author

David Grossman was born in Jerusalem. He is the author of numerous works of fiction, nonfiction, and children's literature. His work has appeared in The New Yorker and has been translated into thirty languages around the world. He is the recipient of many prizes, including the French Chevalier de l'Ordre des Arts et des Lettres, the Buxtehuder Bulle in Germany, Rome's Premio per la Pace e l'Azione Umitaria, the Premio Ischia-- International Award for Journalism, Israel's Emet Prize, and the Albatross Prize given by the Günter Grass Foundation.

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover
Falling Out of Time, by David Grossman, is a novel that had me engrossed from the first page to the last, and then back again, throughout some of the pages.

It is written in a unique format, part poetry, part theater play and part independent prose. This works, because the individual formats vividly illuminate the characters, their thoughts and their feelings regarding death. Oh, the sorrow, the sadness and excruciating pain of it all, so many individuals banding together to journey towards their children, children who have died. The anguish, the need to reunite, the after-effects and affects of death are portrayed with insight, empathy and the continual mourning process of not letting go.

The expressions of grief and mourning are compelling, profound and caused this reader to reread specific pages. The writing is incredibly overpowering and intense, yet filled with beautiful prose that connects each poetic articulation so brilliantly. I can not say enough.

The never-ending/eternal fragments left behind to those who remain are depicted with masterful word-imagery. The poetic prose is absolutely stunning, poignant, heart-wrenching. As a parent, I can not imagine one of my children leaving this earth before me. It is an unspeakable thought. And, that is what the title implies: The word "death" is too agonizing to utter, as if saying the word finalizes the death, making the reality a starkness. The main character chooses to define death as a person who has fallen out of time.

He, known as "Man", and his wife are trying to begin to communicate about their son's death, five years after the fact. Their relationship since then has been one of non-communicative status.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Grief isn't linear. It circles around and around, but never really gets anywhere. I don't know if this is what David Grossman meant to convey with the events described in his book, Falling Out of Time, but I think so. I think so because I know that David Grossman knows grief - not knows about - but knows in his bones through painful experience.

I can understand that the form of this book (I hesitate to call it a novel, because it could just as easily be described as poetry, play, myth, fairy tale...) will put some people off. But it made sense to me, because it is a remarkably emotionally truthful depiction of grief, The spare structure enhances the message.

There are so many ways to lose, but this is a book specifically about parents dealing with the death of their children. If you've had that experience, you will recognize yourself, your emotions and reactions in the pages of David Grossman's book: shock, denial, anger, desperation, guilt, bargaining, acceptance... It's all there, excruciatingly beautifully described:

Midwife:
Dear God, such pain
cuts suddenly deep down
in my stomach, my girl -
if only I knew that th-th-there, too,
when you arrived,
when you finished dying,
you were welcomed with loving arms
and a warm, fragrant t-t-towel,
and someone,
or something, in whose bosom
you found peace
in those first moments.

I think one of the greatest sources of comfort is knowing that you are understood. That you do not walk this terrible road alone. A book like Falling Out of Time can bring you some peace.
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Format: Hardcover
This book is the most accurate and poetic description
about the experience of losing a child I have ever read. Grossman speaks the language of loss; some sentences
actually left me breathless. Metaphor, drama, poetry and realism mix freely for a searing but ultimately healing experience. I cannot recommend it highly enough.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The book embodies the experience of profound grief. The shifts from archetypal reality--the dream-like state of inner chanting and keening--into navigating through the outer world--are both lulling and exhausting.

It's reminiscent of the trance imposed by a Classical Greek tragedy. The characters shift from their unique stories into becoming anonymous members of a chorus--then back to their individual characters. I found it reminiscent of the work of TS Eliot.

Not an easy read, but one that captures the nature of grief as few works have done. I'll be surprised if it doesn't show up as a theatre production at some point.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
While I think that the book may be able to reach some people who are into a more poetic style of writing, it failed to reach me in the way I would have liked. To be fair, I went into the book with an expectation to get some perspective on death and dying, and I may have been looking for something different than the book was offering.

The style is too halting and choppy for my taste---you go from a poetic style of writing to a more story-telling style of writing every other page. I prefer a book that is more consistent, stylistically.
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By CBL on July 31, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Grossman's meditation is both revelatory of his own grief and a source-book for the grieving; never sentimental, always apposite.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Another D. Grossman work expressing thoughts related to death. The convoluted and complicated interplay between poetry and prose is stimulating. This reader had comprehension difficulties and is not certain how to apportion the blame: on the reader or the author.
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