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Falling Stars (Firestar Saga) Mass Market Paperback – March 15, 2002


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Product Details

  • Series: Firestar Saga (Book 4)
  • Mass Market Paperback: 512 pages
  • Publisher: Tor Science Fiction; 1st edition (March 15, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812561848
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812561845
  • Product Dimensions: 4.2 x 1.4 x 6.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (10 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #968,183 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

The world is menaced in true cataclysmic fashion in this epic of the near future, the conclusion to Flynn's previous books, Firestar, Rogue Star and Lodestar. The premise of the novel is exciting enough, and Flynn handles a vast number of characters reasonably well (there's a four-page list of names at the beginning), but the overall effect is exhausting. In the year 2017 certain asteroids have changed their orbit and are on a collision course with Earth. There's a global financial crash, and politics--including the quasi-fascistic machinations of a Huey Long-like politico--force the principals from Flynn's other novels to band together and voyage to an asteroid in a desperate, if not suicidal, attempt to save the world. Some of the characters are jaw-droppingly yclept (Chase Coughlin, Choo-choo Honnycott, Alexandra Feathershaft, Meat Tucker), and some of the techno-babble is irritatingly obtuse. And if Bill Pronzini ever does an SF version of Gun in Cheek, he need look no further for absurd, "alternative" dialogue. (A sample: "No, carry on, Rosario. I just realized. Some herbie dust bunny with his thumb up his toot stepped up on that flange and crunched the fibrops against the edge with his goddam boot!") Still, for readers hungry for a politically astute, crisis-laden SF novel in a well-imagined future, this is adequate fare.

Copyright 2001 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

The discovery of a group of asteroids headed toward Earth sparks a flurry of political and scientific maneuvering to prevent a disastrous collision. When some of the asteroids change their course, as if directed by some alien intelligence, a fleet of ships travels to the nearest asteroid in a desperate attempt to deflect it, destroy it, or, perhaps, capture it for future study. The conclusion of Flynn's grand-scale near-future epic combines the rapid pacing of sf action adventure with the subtle maneuverings of political intrigue in a panoramic drama of human courage and sacrifice. A good choice, along with other series titles (Lodestar, Rogue Star, Firestar), for most sf collections.
Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

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Customer Reviews

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Folks like to compare Flynn to Heinlein.
L. Wick
If you're going to read this series, you're going to need to make a significant investment in time and energy.
David Zampino
The action is as gripping as any thriller.
Harold M. Curtis

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Arthur W. Jordin on November 12, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Firestar (1996) is the first novel in the Firestar Saga series. Mariesa Gorley van Huyten is the teenage heiress of an old and very rich family. She is eager to take over the management of the family business from her grandfather and has decided to obtain a degree at Chicago to learn the basics of administration and management. During the summer before leaving for college, however, she has a vivid vision of a large meteor strike and resulting destruction which haunts her for the rest of her life.

In the following years, Mariesa concludes that the only protection against human extinction from meteor strikes is an active and prosperous space industry throughout the solar system, providing both defense capabilities and dispersal of the population in self-sufficient habitats. Since very few others are concerned with the meteor risk, she determines to promote such industry by means of Van Huyten Industries.

Christian van Huyten III had begun naming his companies after mythological characters in 1873, so the space initiative adopted by Mariesa shortly after she takes over is named the Prometheus Project. She recruits several of the VHI executives into the Prometheus Steering Committee. Development of a single-stage to orbit prototype for the project is performed by Daedalus Corporation, a Brazilian subsidiary, with materiel and expertise provided by other VHI companies. Daedalus hires Ned DuBois and Forrest Calhoun as test pilots for the new "Plank" SSTOs.

Mariesa also sees better education as a necessity to support Prometheus, so she acquires Mentor Academies, a private education concern, and expands it to manage public schools, under contract with the states and local school districts.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By D. Bowles on January 2, 2007
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Michael Flynn concludes the near-future "Firestar" series in style. In the year 2017 the varied cast comes together to try to save Earth from impending disaster - an asteroid has somehow changed course and is now on a collision course with earth. The machinations of the previous novels all finally make sense, as there is now a team of dedicated, well-trained professionals perfectly equipped to attempt an intercept and diversion of the asteroid. This novel ties up all the political and industrial loose ends, and gives closure to the character development (although it must be noted that not all endings are happy ones). Flynn embraces the near-future genre with all the deftness and imagination of Heinlein while adding a very definite hard technical slant. This series may not be great fare for those readers who despise techno-babble, but for the rest of us it's a satisfying feast.
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8 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Ron N. Butler on February 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
The fourth book of the trilogy...
Maybe if the third book in this series had not marked time so badly, Flynn wouldn't have had to cram as much material into the fourth. And maybe he wouldn't have had to leave so many major plot elements (Most notably: Who Threw the Rocks and Why?) dangling. Just from the viewpoint of plot mechanics, "Falling Stars" is unsatisfying -- and that makes the whole series frustrating.
From a viewpoint of characterization, all the major characters dig down to the clockwork in their souls -- and somehow it's just not very interesting. Possibly that's because it's the male characters getting in touch with their inmost selves in "Falling Stars," where the women went through this process in the earlier books. Flynn has written some of the most unpleasant, manipulative, driven female characters I've read in years -- but they're capable of better than their clockworks would indicate and they're always interesting. The males, on the other hand, don't seem to get beyond overripe adolescence.
I'm glad I read the "Stars" series -- Flynn is hugely inventive and his style is pleasant -- but I doubt I'll ever feel drawn to re-read it.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
The Firestar Saga: Firestar, Lodestar, Roguestar, and Falling Stars; was so vivid that I can only compare it to blockbuster movies. I find myself at a loss of a sufficient comparison to other SF books and authors -- even after over half a century of reading hard SF. This was one of the best, of course building on all of those that went before. Michael Flynn learned from the best of the best, and you get hints and allusions to that SF background from comments made by the characters - they are as amazed and thrilled to be DOING science fiction as we are to read it.
Unlike classical science fiction (even some of the best of the best), the character development is as deep and intricate as a New York Times bestseller or a prime time mini-series. The action is as gripping as any thriller.
The movies to compare to, again the best of the best: Stand and Deliver; The Right Stuff (Two-Disc Special Edition); Manions of America [VHS]; Dirty Sexy Money: Season One; and Space Cowboys.
Even after 2000 pages, you will be surprised and disappointed that it is over.
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Format: Mass Market Paperback
. . . to an incredible series.

When I first began to read the "Firestar" series -- especially after finishing the first book, I honestly wondered if the author could carry the story through the entire series in a credible manner.

I wonder no longer.

"Falling Stars" is a worthy conclusion to what must be one of the most ambitious Hard Science Fiction sagas ever written.

Without wishing to include plot spoilers, suffice it to say that the author has successfully wrapped up loose ends, left room for more books (though none are necessary) and provides satisfying conclusions (though not all are happy ones) for virtually all of the major characters readers of the series have grown to know and love. (I'll be honest -- there were points toward the end where I had tears in my eyes!)

Let's be honest. If you're going to read this series, you're going to need to make a significant investment in time and energy. Michael Flynn is a master storyteller. That does not mean he's an "easy read".

But if you, like me, are a true lover of Story -- the investment is well worth the effort.

Very, very highly recommended!
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