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Falling into the Sun: A Novel Paperback – July 15, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 363 pages
  • Publisher: Spoonbill Cove Press (July 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 098154102X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0981541020
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 5.5 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (17 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,509,069 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Charrie Hazard, an award-winning journalist, worked as an investigative reporter and then as an editorial writer and op-ed columnist for the St. Petersburg Times in Florida, before leaving journalism to pursue teaching and fiction writing.

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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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See all 17 customer reviews
Only one who has lived this can truly understand what Hazard is describing.
Charles F. Hawkins
This book is full of life and hope and caring and I applaud Charrie for this extremely well written and thought-provoking novel.
Caroline Mckeon
If you are a parent struggling with whether to seek mental health help for a child, I'd recommend this book.
ruthjoec

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Tammie Lindeberg on July 19, 2009
Format: Paperback
Falling into the Sun follows a parental path that gives a startling view of what life is like for a parent on an incredible quest to save a child. It is during this journey seeking knowledge that will keep her son off of a path of destruction that Kate's own heart is strengthened and opened by an amazing series of events. Kate's struggles and trials with her son Josh may not be typical. However, the ultimate goal of finding the spirit within that will lead us to a greater knowledge is an inspiration to all who read Charrie Hazard's touchingly told story of a mother's deep love and search for answers.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Charles F. Hawkins on July 17, 2009
Format: Paperback
Falling into the Sun bares the raw parental confrontation with raising a child who is more than a teenage problem, but one that shows raw violent, confrontation followed by remorse. Bedroom doors are locked at night to protect sisters. Only one who has lived this can truly understand what Hazard is describing. Hazard writes well emptying her inner thoughts to analyze the complex dynamics. You live the experience as you read it. It gave me the feeling that I am not alone in struggling with an out of control child.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Angie Jones on July 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
This poignant novel is a doorway to a deeper dimension of life and spirit. Through an alchemy of science, faith and art, Charrie Hazard expands a reader's understanding of mental disorders, personal relationships, ambition, love, life and afterlife. If you turn each page with an open heart and mind, you will witness two neighbors' interconnected tumble into separate destinies. Buy it. Read it. Return to it through your years. "Falling into the Sun" soars.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Viviane Crystal VINE VOICE on October 8, 2011
Format: Paperback
Kate Nardek's life is both tender and searing to the mind and spirit of any sensitive reader - just like reality! Severely traumatized by seeing her neighbor, Michael, immediately after his suicide, Kate is tormented by visualizing him in almost every aspect of her life. Her awareness of his presence undergoes several phases, the first being overwhelmed by the presence of evil's dark power within and without one's person. While Kate doesn't seem to be getting over this horrific event quickly enough to satisfy her husband and family, she is also tormented by her son, Josh's increasingly violent outbursts which at the moment are confined to destroying physical objects but are bordering on threatening physical violence. It's enough to make a person crazy, and Kate wonders whether she's really losing it and whether her family will fall apart in the process.

But the poignant beauty of this book, alongside its acutely mental and spiritual challenges, is enjoying the earthy but transcendent process Kate and her family experience. Kate's journey is guided by a wise and delightful godmother and dear friend, Jean; a rather unorthodox priest, Father Nick; an "old soul" psychologist, Dr. Galen; and a psychiatrist. Kate faces her own inner darkness, her son's unspeakable and frightening diagnosis and her own father's true illness belied by his obvious alcoholism.

"Free-falling into the hands of the God/Goddess" is a wonderful process Kate learns to live in day by day, one that is not a pie-in-the-sky new age-ish type of spirituality but instead one that embraces every facet of kind and cruel daily living. What would it be like to embrace every single event with a realistic awareness that each moment is a gift?
Read more ›
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By SLP on July 14, 2009
Format: Paperback
What a wonderful switch from what I would normally read -- ridiculous romance novels to take me away for a while. Well this book was something very different. It made me think. The main character is real. She could be any of us with her troubles and insecurities. In this story the reader will experience the strength of human spirit. I admire the courage and love of a mother trying to help her son. Each person that reads it will come away with their own message and their own "take" on life. I think any reader will finish the book feeling inspired. I just loved it and would highly recommend it to anyone!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A. Anderson on July 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
Falling into the Sun: A Novel Charrie Hazard's "Falling Into the Sun" tells of Kate Nardek, a woman pushed by her neighbor's suicide into reconciling her marred and distorted, imperfect self--revealed in what she sees as her failings as a mother, as a wife, as a daughter, as a human being--with the perfect image of God, in which she was created but lost somewhere along the way.

In control in the classroom, Kate skillfully engages her reticent college students into thinking and conversing deeply about the origins of evil. But when evil assaults her through her neighbor Michael's suicide and her own son's increasingly violent behavior, Kate's façade of control crumbles and the unresolved "big" questions that for years she has half-answered, then stuffed inside, come spilling out.

Is there a God? If there is, then why doesn't He/She DO something? Why do we suffer? Why do our children suffer? Why, why, why? What, in heaven's name, does God want from us? Tell us the answer, please, so we can just do it, and then get back to living our lives.

Only, as Kate discovers, "our lives" is what God wants. Not the life we think we "ought" to be living. The life God intended from the beginning for us to live.

This first novel by Charrie Hazard is an impressive debut. Hazard deftly draws us into Kate's life, Kate's self, and into Michael's life, Michael's self, then compels us, scene by scene, to watch the painful deconstruction of both selves and of the worlds those selves think they control. Hazard makes us think past our cloudy assumptions to a place in the sun where self opens itself to letting something, someone greater reveal a vastly larger picture than we have seen before.

That's not to say the novel is perfect. Then again, nothing in this world is. Maybe that's the point.
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