Qty:1
  • List Price: $24.95
  • Save: $11.43 (46%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 13 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Fallout has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping! Ships within 1 business day. Arrives within 3-8 business days. May contain highlighting/markings or cover wear. Book in ACCEPTABLE condition. This item does not include any CDs, Infotracs, Access cards or other supplementary material.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Fallout Paperback – December 31, 2001


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$13.52
$11.95 $3.95

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.


Frequently Bought Together

Fallout + The Crazy Iris: And Other Stories of the Atomic Aftermath
Price for both: $26.52

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: G.T. Labs; First Edition edition (December 31, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0966010639
  • ISBN-13: 978-0966010633
  • Product Dimensions: 9.7 x 7.1 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #363,297 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

Ottaviani's nonfiction graphic novel about the two most famous "dissident" creators of the atom bomb meets and in sophistication exceeds the standards set by Art Spiegelman's Maus (1991-92), Harvey Pekar and Joyce Brabner's Our Cancer Year (1994), and Rick Geary's series of nineteenth-century true-crime stories. Like Pekar and Brabner, Ottaviani writes the text and plans the layout of his books; the artwork he assigns to several hands, which results in a visual variety that adds complexity and interest. This practice well suits the entwined stories of Hungarian emigre physicist Szilard, who was politically concerned well before the Manhattan Project, and American physicist Oppenheimer, who became concerned primarily afterward, when his colleagues, especially Edward Teller, pushed development of the H-bomb. Some chapters are the primary work of one artist but contain insertions by another; for example, Jeff Parker draws "Work," about the final preparations and the test explosion at the site called Trinity, in a loose-lined style much like that of the movie storyboards he does for a living, but Janine Johnston's painterly, photographic style illustrates with chilling effectiveness the explosion and Oppenheimer's famous quotation of the Bhagavad Gita, "I am become death, destroyer of worlds." More daringly, in the chapter on Oppenheimer's hearing before he was denied security clearance in 1954 and dismissed from the Atomic Energy Commission, Ottaviani runs edited texts of letters between Oppenheimer and the hearing board and of the hearing's transcript and conclusions in columns parallel to Steve Lieber's panels, in which emotional tone is altered by simply changing the backdrop from white to black. Ottaviani's notes on his sources and his deviations from them and an annotated list of references round off this immensely impressive "comic book." Ray Olson
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

Review

Immensely impressive. (starred review) -- Booklist, January 2002

Customer Reviews

I really enjoyed this graphic novel.
justasocialstudiesteacher
I really like this author, Suspended in Language was amazing as well as Feynman.
oxygenelmo
This book is a superbly written with very good pictures.
M. Cerra

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Dan on August 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
This graphic novel, subtitled "J. Robert Oppenheimer, Leo Szilard, and the Political Science of the Atomic Bomb", is a good quick read. It's hard for my generation, raised with the fall of the Soviet Union, to appreciate how stupendous the atomic bomb really was. But this book does a great job of making the history of that period accessible. The book is not that short-around 200 pages-but, due to its graphic nature, is very easy to read.

Fallout is really divided into two major sections. The first is concerned with the idea and creation of the atomic bomb, starting from Szilard's ideas in the 1930s and ending with the Trinity test in 1945. The second is concerned with the inquiry into Oppenheimer's advisory position to the Atomic Energy Commission, which occured in the political climate of the 1950s. Both these are worth reading, but the second one, which has much more text-portions of letters are printed along with the graphics-is a chilling reminder of the craziness of that time.

With 6 different authors listed on the cover (and more in the back pages), the illustrations change often enough that you do have to pay attention to know who is speaking. Additional difficulties arise because there are so many characters. I think the book would be stronger if one author had been responsible for all of the graphic content because the characters would be easier to keep track of.

One very nice aspect of this book is the end notes. At the back of the book, extensive text outlines what parts are true and what parts are surmise. As the front of the book saysm "many of the quotes and incidents that you'll think most likely to be made up are the best documented facts." For example, Teller, one of the scientists, denies his similarity to Dr Strangelove, and another, Szilard, devises his own cancer treatment using radiation.

All in all, if you're in for a light introduction to the history of one of the heaviest subjects, Fallout is a good choice.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By justasocialstudiesteacher on August 6, 2010
Format: Paperback
I really enjoyed this graphic novel. Initially I bought it intending to use for an 8th grade classroom, but upon reading found the content and writing style to be more academically mature - a greater level of basic understanding of the background issues is assumed, and the historical aspects of Oppenheimer's trial were nicely portrayed in my opinion with use of actual documents and such. So in a way I was pleasantly surprised to find that the novel was a bit over the head of my students and intended for a HS-level and above audience. The illustrations are nice and while there of course is plenty of info that was not included that I'm curious about, the authors had to pick and choose and I think they've done a fantastic job. A quick and fun read.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By M. Cerra on March 29, 2009
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Jim Ottaviani communicates both scientific and historical fact in a comic book way. I usually shun the reading of graphic novels, as most of them communicate nothing more than good story line with little literary skill involved in its text. However, I will read Ottaviani because, whereas he does communicate through a graphic novel, he communicates fact and he does it very well. Fallout is no exception to his writing talent. I would heavily recommend this book to anyone who enjoys graphic novels and I would recommend this book to one who do not enjoy graphic novels. This book is a superbly written with very good pictures. Without a doubt this book scores a five out of five and the author scores a five out of five as well. Along with Alan Moore, Jim Ottaviani is one of the best graphic novelists.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jean E. Pouliot on August 5, 2011
Format: Paperback
Fallout tells the back story of the development of the Manhattan Project, which developed the atomic bomb. The story focuses on Leo Szilard, a German scientist trying to outrace the Nazis, and Robert Oppenheimer, who led the project. Told by several graphics artist , each with a different style, the story tries to capture the complex blend of personalities who contributed to build the bomb. Oppenheimer is cool, refined and unflappable. Szilard is a ball of fire, running to and fro behind the scenes to get political support for the bomb and to procure graphite or uranium oxide for the tests. Enrico Fermi is aloof, detached and territorial, upset about Szilard's machinations, but wholly dependent on them. The story is fascinating and ultimately turns tragic, as America, newly victorious in the war, starts to turn its suspicions on its own loyal citizens, including Oppenheimer.

The book loses a star for a several reasons. The change in style from one artist to another made it hard to keep track of the characters. Then, too, many of the more interesting parts of the story were found in the Notes section. For instance, when lugging graphite blocks (used to build the reactor in Chicago) became too much for the pencil-pushing scientists, burly football players were enlisted to help. You would have to be psychic to figure this out from the drawings. There were many other instances in which the drawings did not communicate the story very well. In one three-panel section, Albert Einstein is shown thinking about whether to urge President Roosevelt to build the bomb. The Notes tell us that Einstein, a pacifist, was considering the political, moral and scientific aspects of his advice. But without the notes, who would know?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Jim Ottaviani has worked in news agencies and golf courses in the Chicago area, nuclear reactors in the U.S. and Japan, and libraries in Michigan. He still works as a librarian by day, but stays up late writing comics about scientists. When he's not doing these things, he's spraining his ankles and flattening his feet by running on trails. Or he's reading. He reads a lot. Elsewhere on the web you can find him at www.gt-labs.com .

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?