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Famous Men Of Rome: History for the Thoughtful Child Paperback – March 1, 1989

ISBN-13: 978-1882514038 ISBN-10: 1882514033

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Famous Men Of Rome:  History for the Thoughtful Child + Famous Men of Greece (Greenleaf Press) + D'Aulaires' Book of Greek Myths
Price for all three: $45.61

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 160 pages
  • Publisher: Greenleaf Press (March 1, 1989)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1882514033
  • ISBN-13: 978-1882514038
  • Product Dimensions: 10.8 x 8.3 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #408,677 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Haaren & Poland were the superintendants of schools for the cities of New York and Newark in 1904. Rob & Cyndy Shearer have advanced degrees in English & History and have been teachers and homeschooling parents for thirty years.

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Customer Reviews

It is easy to read, engaging, and very informative.
John Nelson
For those who plan to use Famous Men of Rome in teaching their children, I recommend also getting the Greenleaf Guide to Famous Men of Rome.
Charles Flemming
Both my high school and middle school children love it, as do I!
DavidSaint

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

32 of 34 people found the following review helpful By P. Gardner on May 27, 2000
Format: Paperback
Famous Men of Rome continues to effectively introduce children to ancient history.
The author states in the 1904 preface: "The former practice in many elementary schools of beginning the detailed study of American history without any previous knowledge of general history limited the pupil's range of vision, restricted his sympathies, and left him without material for comparisons. Moreover, it denied to him a knowledge of his inheritance from the Greek philosopher, the Roman lawgiver, the Teutonic lover of freedom."
Your child will be captured by the fable of Romulus and Remus. He or she will wonder at Cincinnatus who chose to be a farmer rather than a dictator. And your child will admire Marcus Aurelius, a noble emperor who lived simply, used his own money to help the poor, and walked the streets greeting people and listening to their troubles so he could be a better leader.
Older students may read Plutarch but elementary children will gained a foundation for history by reading about "Famous Men."
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31 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Charles Flemming on August 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have a confession to make. One of the really cool things I'm enjoying about homeschooling in general, and teaching my kids history in particular, is that I get to learn right along with them. I'm playing a bit of a trick on them: I stay just enough ahead to maintain my credibility as their teacher. Truth is, I'm really their fellow-student. That's one reason the Famous Men series and their companion guides from Greenleaf Press are so helpful to me. Short, informative chapters that quickly capture the story of history as lived through the lives of influential individuals. In my opinion, biography is at least as important as event, because biography lets us in on the "why" and "how" of history more effectively than covering dates and events. And isn't that what we most need to know? Famous Men of Rome is faithful to this vision of learning history through biography. There are thirty chapters covering over 29 people and 11 centuries, from the legendary founding of Rome to its slow unraveling in the early centuries after Christ. Each chapter is a fascinating read. For those who plan to use Famous Men of Rome in teaching their children, I recommend also getting the Greenleaf Guide to Famous Men of Rome. It provides ideas, discussion questions, of most help to me, comprehensive lists of additional resources. I also recommend Laurie Carlson's Classical Kids and The Classical Companion, by Charles F. Baker III and Rosalie F. Baker. They will help you transport your children back to the days of ancient Rome and Greece. My children, who admittedly are avid readers, love these books. So does their father.
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52 of 61 people found the following review helpful By Shopper in Richmond on September 24, 2006
Format: Paperback
Though the subtitle of the book is "Roman History," the text actually begins with the Roman myth of Romulus and Remus. This is not inappropriate, however, the myths are not prefaced with "the story goes..." or "Roman history begins with the myth..." or any sort of indication that the history book begins with mythology. The myths are related in the same factual tone as the rest of the book. Now when most children read that Sylvia married the god Mars and then bore him twin sons, they would recognize this as a myth, but how would they know where the myth ended and the real story began? There is no distinction in this book between the mythology and the history. It just reports that Sylvia bore Romulus and Remus, Romulus was the first king, Numa became king after him, then Tullus Hostilius, etc.

On the other hand it is interesting that in relating the story of Constantine's vision of heavenly cross emblazoned with the words, "in hoc signo vinces," the book makes a point of saying that "Constantine said" this happened, rather than "Constantine saw" this. This is nit-picky but it just seemed odd that this incident apart from all others in the book should be so carefully related as hearsay.

I also have a problem with the prioritization of the events in Diocletian's reign. The text states, "Diocletian's primary legacy is the division of the Empire into eastern and western halves." The Christian persecutions (the main thing I associate with Diocletian's reign) are relegated to a mere two sentences.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Charles Flemming on August 28, 2001
Format: Paperback
I have a confession to make. One of the really cool things I'm enjoying about homeschooling in general, and teaching my kids history in particular, is that I get to learn right along with them. I'm playing a bit of a trick on them: I stay just enough ahead to maintain my credibility as their teacher. Truth is, I'm really their fellow-student. That's one reason the Famous Men series and their companion guides from Greenleaf Press are so helpful to me. Short, informative chapters that quickly capture the story of history as lived through the lives of influential individuals. In my opinion, biography is at least as important as event, because biography lets us in on the "why" and "how" of history more effectively than covering dates and events. And isn't that what we most need to know? Famous Men of Rome is faithful to this vision of learning history through biography. There are thirty chapters covering over 29 people and 11 centuries, from the legendary founding of Rome to its slow unraveling in the early centuries after Christ. Each chapter is a fascinating read. For those who plan to use Famous Men of Rome in teaching their children, I recommend also getting the Greenleaf Guide to Famous Men of Rome. It provides ideas, discussion questions, of most help to me, comprehensive lists of additional resources. I also recommend Laurie Carlson's Classical Kids and The Classical Companion, by Charles F. Baker III and Rosalie F. Baker. They will help you transport your children back to the days of ancient Rome and Greece. My children, who admittedly are avid readers, love these books. So does their father.
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