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DungeonQuest


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  • A re-envisioning of the classic game of dungeon adventure
  • Features hero cards to be used in Runewars, Descent: Journeys in the Dark and Runebound
  • For ages 13 + years
  • For 1 - 4 players
  • Playing time: 90 min
7 new from $140.00 5 collectible from $68.00


WARNING:
CHOKING HAZARD -- Small parts. Not for children under 3 yrs.

Product Details

  • Product Dimensions: 3 x 11.8 x 11.8 inches ; 4 pounds
  • Shipping Weight: 4.2 pounds
  • Shipping: Currently, item can be shipped only within the U.S. and to APO/FPO addresses. For APO/FPO shipments, please check with the manufacturer regarding warranty and support issues.
  • Origin: Imported (China)
  • ASIN: 1589949048
  • Item model number: VA72
  • Manufacturer recommended age: 13 years and up
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #205,501 in Toys & Games (See Top 100 in Toys & Games)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
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Product Description

From the Manufacturer

DungeonQuest is a re-imagining of the classic board game of dungeon exploration for 1-4 players. Set in the vibrant fantasy realm of Terrinoth (first popularized by Runebound), DungeonQuest retains the peril, tension, and brutality of the beloved original game while updating both mechanical and thematic elements. Players take on the roles of brave (or foolish) heroes willing to brave the legendary dangers of Dragonfire Dungeon. Fortune awaits those able to venture into the dragon's lair...In DungeonQuest, Players must guide their heroes through the twisting halls of Dragonfire Dungeon in pursuit of unimaginable riches hoarded by the Dragon Lord Kalladra. Whoever can amass the most wealth and make it out of the dungeon before the closing of the doors seals their doom will emerge victorious. However, merely surviving the harrowing dungeon is a feat all its own...

Product Description

DungeonQuest is a re-imagining of the classic board game of dungeon exploration for 1-4 players. Set in the vibrant fantasy realm of Terrinoth (first popularized by Runebound), DungeonQuest retains the peril, tension, and brutality of the beloved original game while updating both mechanical and thematic elements. Players take on the roles of brave (or foolish) heroes willing to brave the legendary dangers of Dragonfire Dungeon. Fortune awaits those able to venture into the dragon's lair. In DungeonQuest, Players must guide their heroes through the twisting halls of Dragonfire Dungeon in pursuit of unimaginable riches hoarded by the Dragon Lord Kalladra. Whoever can amass the most wealth and make it out of the dungeon before the closing of the doors seals their doom will emerge victorious. However, merely surviving the harrowing dungeon is a feat all its own.

Customer Questions & Answers

Customer Reviews

In fact, I would argue that it's isn't for most people.
M. Clark Coston
The different stats for the characters also call for very different strategies.
QuickReader
You must approach this game for what it is, a good, light hearted dungeon romp.
David Culp

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

61 of 63 people found the following review helpful By Luke Keppler on September 17, 2010
Let me get this out of the way first.

I'm a proud owner of the original 1985 edition published by Games Workshop, along with the Heroes of DungeonQuest and Catacombs expansions. There are an absolute myriad of unscripted ways in which you can die, and your job is to survive with as much loot as possible. Thank DungeonQuest for turning me into a connoisseur of rogue-like video games such as NetHack, Diablo, ADOM, and even ToeJam & Earl.

DungeonQuest (1985 edition) has been an almost unmatched favorite board game of mine for over 20 years. In fact, I purchased Descent: Journeys in the Dark in an attempt to find an newer game with similar gameplay to DungeonQuest. Alas, Descent is great, but doesn't scratch the itch. When I heard that Fantasy Flight Games picked up publishing rights, I anxiously awaited their release with skepticism. I could finally stop worrying about losing/damaging the long out-of-print contents, but only if they could reproduce the experience!

I've played this 2010 edition of DungeonQuest very aggressively both solo and with up to 3 players (age 30+). Ready to pass judgement. I'll try to clarify for new players, though there are many references to changes from the 1985 edition.

Pros:
- Custom characters. Each of the 6 unique characters has meaningfully distinct perks. Depending on which character you draw at the start, you will significantly change your combat or exploration strategy.

- Catacombs.
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24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By M. Clark Coston on December 10, 2010
Verified Purchase
Let's get this out of the way first: DungeonQuest is a game of luck. There are no two ways about it. Luck factors into this game in almost every way it can as everything is random. The players choose a character at random (if you go by the instructions), the layout of the dungeon's rooms is chosen at random, what is inside those rooms is chosen at random, the survival of traps and various perils is random, and that includes fighting. The players of DungeonQuest are at the mercy of the Random Number God, and what a cruel god he often is. It is that cruelness, however, where some of the enjoyment of DungeonQuest comes from. DungeonQuest is a brutal game. Most characters do not make it out alive. Therefore, enjoyment of DungeonQuest requires the ability to accept a random fate and laugh at your misfortunes. Also, because of the relentlessly random nature of the game, there is some small thrill to be had when your character is teetering on the edge of a bottomless pit and the only thing that can save him is the result of a pair of dice you are about to throw.

DungeonQuest isn't for everyone. In fact, I would argue that it's isn't for most people. If you can accept the random and aren't disheartened by a character's sudden (sometimes very sudden) death, then you may be able to enjoy DungeonQuest. If not, look elsewhere for your dungeon crawl.
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27 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Steve G. on April 15, 2011
Verified Purchase
Like many nerdy kids, I grew up reading comic books and playing board games. And like many of those kids, I had to reach a certain age before it dawned upon me that the stories in the comics didn't just write themselves. As for games, it wasn't until my college years that I came to fully appreciate that there were pinciples that made it possible to distinguish good design from bad. In the blissful ignorance of my youth, I would play a game like Talisman and be held rapt with wonder at the endless variety of events that could unfold as I rolled dice and drew cards. Corpse or king, all decided by the utterly unpredictable whims of fate.

Then I grew up and developed the capacity for strategy and analysis. Crap-shoot, one-armed-bandit games fell to the wayside as relics of a less-enlightened era. One such game I developed a passion for was Fantasy Flight's tactical miniatures game, "Descent". Having recently learned that Fantasy Flight packed a number of new Descent cards and minis as bonus offerings in a game called DungeonQuest, I decided to seek it out. I remembered playing it at a convention and being rather underwhelmed, but I figured with it being from FFG, I could get my money's worth out of it. I suppose in some ways I'm still naive. What a sucker punch.

I got DungeonQuest about thirty years too late. Its target audience are those who never emerged from that nascient acceptance of arbitrary reward and punishment that old-school games like Talisman and AD&D instilled. Don't mention the word "balance" in such company. To them, the notion that risk and reward should in some way correlate is the mark of some whiny rules lawyer with an undeserved sense of entitlement. For what is the point of a game?
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By QuickReader on January 28, 2011
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Hi. This is a great game to play by yourself if you like dungeon crawls. I've only played it solo which is what I got it for. The games are usually pretty quick because the dungeon is so lethal to your character. Some games might only last 5 minutes. You can play it many times without getting tired of it. I've played it about 30 times and my success rate was about 20 percent. It is very random and some would say unfair but that is pretty much the name of the game and what makes it fun for me. There is some strategy to which path you try to take and playing a card at the right time but it is a very programmed game. It is a game of "Let's see how far I get before I die and how will I die THIS time." It's very much a black comedy. It's never TOO frustrating when my character dies. Part of the reason for this is that the game is so fast. Just play it again.. and die again. The timer and your health points make for a lot of tense game play because you have to leave the dungeon before the clock runs out or your health runs out. The different stats for the characters also call for very different strategies. The dwarf is great at fighting monsters but if he draws a lethal trap card his Luck skill will be his demise. The wizard is just the opposite. Also some characters seem easier to play.

The original combat system is a little clunky using cards but there is an official dice combat variation on the Fantasy Flight website. The original combat isn't horrible but the dice version is much faster. I have left the game set up on a table for days where I can sit down and play it when I have half an hour to spare. And that's half an hour for a complete solo game. I'd buy this game again in a heartbeat.
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