Enter your mobile number or email address below and we'll send you a link to download the free Kindle App. Then you can start reading Kindle books on your smartphone, tablet, or computer - no Kindle device required.

  • Apple
  • Android
  • Windows Phone
  • Android

To get the free app, enter your email address or mobile phone number.

Buy Used
$1.54
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by hippo_books
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Very Good: Cover and pages show some wear from reading and storage.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

The Far Side of Eden: New Money, Old Land, and the Battle for Napa Valley Hardcover – Bargain Price, October 24, 2002

3.7 out of 5 stars 22 customer reviews

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Price
New from Used from
Hardcover, Bargain Price, October 24, 2002
$9.95 $1.52

This is a bargain book and quantities are limited. Bargain books are new but could include a small mark from the publisher and an Amazon.com price sticker identifying them as such. Details
--This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

Top 20 lists in Books
Top 20 lists in Books
View the top 20 best sellers of all time, the most reviewed books of all time and some of our editors' favorite picks. Learn more

Special Offers and Product Promotions


Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

"If Napa Valley can't be saved, no place can," says the county planner, and Conaway's second volume on one of the wealthiest enclaves in America echoes this sentiment, picking up where his first (Napa: The Story of an American Eden) left off, with some overlap. Beautiful Napa in the 1990s is threatened by McMansions, by the blindness of "lucky spermers," (like the Mondavi heirs) and by the nouveau riche desire for boutique wineries with "rocket juice" (cabernet). The first third of the book describes the super-rich with incredulity: Francis Ford Coppola purchased the former Inglenook winery in the mid-1990s and outfitted it with the desk from The Godfather, movie memorabilia and screens for a "multimedia tasting experience." The Sweeneys, owners of Embassy Suites, dynamited to build their five-bedroom house (complete with feng shui) on a visible hillside. They don't flinch when locals complain. The center of the book is the Sierra Club's suit against Jayson Pahlmeyer (among others), whose now-cult wine appeared in the movie Disclosure, for clearing a hillside and violating the California Environmental Quality Act. The prose is often portentous and heavy on description; even minor characters are given full bios. Conaway uses a semifictional style to get into the characters' heads ("Hugh was pulled at by conflicting emotions"), while the author remains invisible, although his preferences are obvious. This is a who's who for anyone in the valley, a must-read for anyone in the business, and will be of interest to those invested in the often clashing interests of agriculture and the environment.
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

From Library Journal

Conaway, the author of nine books and a contributor to Smithsonian and National Geographic Traveler, explored the subject of the Napa Valley a decade ago in his best-selling Napa: The Story of an American Eden. In his latest book, he carefully examines the invasion of Napa in the 1990s by the nouveaux riches who view vineyards as status symbols to be exploited for their social value. In an accessible style, Conaway offers an insider's view and shows how these newcomers are increasingly denuding the land in attempts to create vanity-label wines. Environmentalists and established valley dwellers are fighting the exploitation, but major damage has already been done in the form of polluted rivers and eroded hillsides. As Conaway rightfully concludes, Napa may never recover from the ravages wrought by the greed of the Silicon Valley wonder boys, the movie producers, and the other absentee landlords who now own much of the valley. This important and timely exploration of the ramifications of the unbridled power of the rich to do whatever they wish with America's land is highly recommended for all libraries.
Mary V. Welk, Chicago
Copyright 2002 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE


Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Houghton Mifflin; Reprint. edition (October 24, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0618067396
  • ASIN: B000ULZB7Q
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.5 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (22 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,493,008 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By J. S. Lang on October 2, 2002
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Conaway's first book on the topic, "Napa, the Story of an American Eden," held a mirror to a beautiful place and the wonders of American winemaking. This sequel goes through the looking glass into a world of greed and self absorption, where a monoculture rapes land, trophy homes blight ridgetops, egos swell and rot like grapes too long on the vine.
Finely reported, elegantly written, "The Far Side of Eden" would be depressing -- if the tale weren't told with such wit and good humor. The hubris of winemakers like Pahlmeyer and Staglin and Copolla emerge as hilarious, the self-righteousness of both the winos and the ecos as ridiculous.
It's quite sad, and hugely funny.
I think this is an important book. It spotlights Napa, but it could be anywhere in America where riches come too fast and too much and the result is look-at-me-look-at-me development.
Read it slow, and let it breathe, it's a treat.
Comment 27 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Hardcover
As a former Napa vinter, I eagerly looked forward to reading Conway's excursion into my home county. While there are interesting ideas in the book, they lurk beneath the soil like potatoes, never springing forth to see the light of day. Many of my neighbors (and, I should add, close friends) are presented in this book as gross parodies; this, I suppose, might be expected from an outsider to the region, but I had a difficult time getting past these rough characterizations.
Comment 17 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
If you read Conaway's "Napa: The Story of an American Eden", you know the historical timeline of Napa, from bucolic farming community to modern-day wine titan. Here's the story of Napa's boom years in the 1990s, when insta-multi-millionaires who made their money off the Silicon Valley tech boom and other stock market successes turned to dreams of owning a vineyard. Where else, but Napa?

This book is not quite as smooth and perfect as the first book; sometimes the timeline feels a little disjointed, and can leave the reader a little confused. Overall, however, it paints a picture of the dark side of Napa Valley's intense growing pains as it progressed through the 1990s boom: environmental damage, tourists lining its roads, fights over water rights, the modern disregard for the valley's history. The book is as much a warning about the dark side of success as it is a continued chronicling of Napa's history.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on August 10, 2003
Format: Hardcover
As a Napa resident and former winemaker, I can say that this book truly pulls back the curtains to expose the overinflated egos that are rapidly transforming our valley into just another trendy, overpriced tourist trap.
It is a much more entertaining and accurate read than Kolpan's Sense of Place which basically parrots Coppola's publicity agent's "approved" history. This is a must have book for anyone interested in what goes on behind the scenes in the Napa Valley.
Comment 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By A Customer on October 14, 2003
Format: Paperback
Reading the other reviews, I cannot help but shake my head in astonishment...."Well Written"??? Ideas move in and out of paragraphs with no real logical flow of ideas. Few dates are presented to help the reader follow the timetable (which is likely because the scenes are re-sequenced for dramatic effect). I am an avid reader of literature, but found myself constantly rereading passages to try and decipher the idea being presented or the scene being described. I finally decided that the editor either gave up or never tried. Much of the book reads more like a stream of consciousness than a documentation of events witnessed by the author.
Furthermore, this book is an amalgam of ad hominem attacks on everyone who dares to make money in the wine industry. Those with family money are dismissed as "lucky spermers" unless like, Peter Mennen, they use their money to stop big business. Mennen is portrayed as the noble hero but seems to be more a naive idealist. Certainly, there are forces of good and bad in any capitalist industry, but let's not throw the baby out with the bathwater. Ending vineyard development would lead to one of two things - more houses in place of vineyards or higher and higher prices for vintners as the scarcity increased their profits. Certainly, there is a middle ground yet Conaway, by following the bull-headed extremists, would have us believe that there can be no compromise.
Check this book out from the library if you must read it, but support more even-handed works with your dollars.
Comment 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
By Jimmy Taylor on October 22, 2015
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Conaways first book was very enjoyable, however this one is so bad i had to skip through pages just to get to the ending so i could write this review. Soap operas are bad, but this book will make you want to cut your wrist. A complete spin and twist on the Napa political conservation mess and in the end you will want to kick yourself for wasting quality reading time. Save the $ go buy a Two Buck Chuck and look at the stars instead.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
Format: Paperback
It's taken me all this time to find this little gem of a book and writing a review now seems silly, but it will make me feel good to do so. I've read all the reviews and here's my take on it. As someone who's lived in the SF Bay area for over 30 years I have visited the Napa Valley hundreds of times as I have many friends who live and work there, most of whom are in the hospitality/wine business. While I don't personally know any of the people Conaway writes about I am very familiar with their names and wineries. In my mind there is no doubt that what he writes about is spot on. Many of those people should be ashamed, but we know they aren't nor will ever be. The growth in the Valley to this day is absurd and unnecessary. I don't agree with the review that if vineyards weren't grown on the land homes would be built on it nor do I agree whatsoever that Conaway has a chip on his shoulder. His narrative is intelligent, interesting and stunning. While I'm no literary genius I believe this is a well written book, hilarious at times (the chapter on Coppola is worth the price of the book). I never read "Napa" but will do so now. But like another reviewer states, I would love to read what Conaway would say about the Valley as it is now. But who would talk to him? Snicker. Much has changed and continues to do so; there are dozens of wineries that have come and gone and continue to sprout up. I prefer the micro guys to the corporate giants and enjoy events such as the Silver Pass that has small winemakers opening their doors and vines to the public. It's still one of my favorite places to go, with the exception of Yountville, that used to be a small, quaint, quiet town. It is now an abomination of overpriced real estate, restaurants, lodging, stores, not to mention the traffic. But the downtown area's growth is about as disturbing. Life goes on, the birds keep singing, even though the river is still dirty.
Comment One person found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse

Most Recent Customer Reviews


Pages with Related Products. See and discover other items: colorado history