Faraday, Maxwell, and the Electromagnetic Field and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $25.95
  • Save: $9.54 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Faraday, Maxwell, and the... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Satisfaction Guaranteed. Please contact us with any inquiries. We ship daily. Used items may not include supplemental materials.
Access codes and supplements are not guaranteed with used items.
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for $3.54
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Faraday, Maxwell, and the Electromagnetic Field: How Two Men Revolutionized Physics Hardcover – March 11, 2014

ISBN-13: 978-1616149420 ISBN-10: 1616149426

Buy New
Price: $16.41
46 New from $12.25 16 Used from $13.20
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$16.41
$12.25 $13.20
Best%20Books%20of%202014
$16.41 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. In Stock. Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.

Frequently Bought Together

Faraday, Maxwell, and the Electromagnetic Field: How Two Men Revolutionized Physics + Deep Simplicity: Bringing Order to Chaos and Complexity
Price for both: $32.69

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Prometheus Books (March 11, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1616149426
  • ISBN-13: 978-1616149420
  • Product Dimensions: 6.2 x 1.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (83 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #8,090 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"It's just the best book of its kind I have ever read, and I just hugely enjoyed it. Couldn't put it down. [Their discovery] was a fabulous human achievement."
Charlie Munger, Vice-Chairman of Berkshire Hathaway Corporation, on CNBC's "Squawk Box"

“Compelling. …A lively account of the men and their times and a brilliant exposition of the scientific circumstances and significance of their work.”
Kirkus Reviews, STARRED REVIEW

“The life and science of these two giants of nineteenth-century physics is beautifully documented and narrated in this riveting book.”
Eric D’Hoker, Distinguished Professor of Physics, UCLA; past president, Aspen Center for Physics

“Perhaps the names of Michael Faraday and James Clerk Maxwell aren’t as well known as Newton or Einstein, but they should be. The book traces their amazing collaboration.... But as equally fascinating as the tale of the discovery is that of the men behind it.... A fascinating true tale of the lives of two essential men of physics!” —AstroGuyz
 
“Blends science history and lively biography. …Accessible writing and a feel for character make this an interesting look at two scientists whose work defined an era and set the course for modern physics.”
Publishers Weekly

“Fans of biographies, as well as anyone interested in science and technology…will enjoy reading about these ‘two modest and genial men whose combined endeavors changed the world.’”
Library Journal

About the Author

Nancy Forbes is an experienced science writer with over twenty-five publications in the area of science and technology including Imitation of Life:  How Biology Is Inspiring Computing. She has also served as a contributing editor for The Industrial Physicist of the American Institute of Physics, and IEEE's Computing in Science and Engineering. Currently, she works for the US Department of Defense.

Basil Mahon is the author of The Man Who Changed Everything: The Life of James Clerk Maxwell and Oliver Heaviside: Maverick Mastermind of Electricity, among other publications. With degrees in engineering and statistics, Mahon was formerly an officer in the Royal Electrical and Mechanical Engineers and until his retirement worked for the British Government Statistical Service.

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

The book is very well written and clear.
Kent Price
In this most engaging book, the authors recount the work of two scientific giants of the nineteenth century: Faraday and Maxwell.
G. Poirier
A great document for 19th century history and the sometimes reluctant progress of scientific thought.
Alf Howard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Combining two biographies, those of Michael Faraday and James Clerk Maxwell, is a good device for telling the story of an era in science. The subjects' working lives span most of the 19th century. Though they came from different backgrounds, the two had quite a bit in common. They were incredibly hard-working. The authors go out of their way to tell how genuinely kind they were. They had a true knack for making friends and avoiding long-lasting enmities. The third virtue was of course incredible intelligence. But it seems hardly likely that Englishman of the 19th century alone her were more gifted than other populations and times. Something about that epoch allowed genius to flourish, to reveal itself fully. That epoch is the subject of this rather remarkable book.

Faraday was born as of a poor second generation blacksmith from the North Country. He had the good fortune to arrive in London at a time when the city was intellectually very alive. He could bounce between low-paying jobs giving people a chance to notice and take advantage of his talent. One of the most fortunate postings was as a book binder. The work was not mentally demanding, but it put young Faraday in contact with books. He loved to read, and quickly became quite well informed. It also put him in such with the customers for the books, some of whom took note of the young man's alertness and talents. It was not too long before he became an apprentice to the famous scientist Humphry Davy, who brought him along rather quickly

Among Faraday's attributes was being meticulous, faulting himself deeply when he failed to put out work of the quality he expected of himself. He was kind and generous, and extremely apologetic when he accidentally gave offense, as he did one a couple of occasions.
Read more ›
7 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
18 of 18 people found the following review helpful By Alejandro Dezerega on May 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I can't find the proper words to describe the emotions that were felt while reading the book. As an electrical engineer, I was familiar with the concepts behind the story. But learning how it was discovered, shows how great these men were. Maybe for the general reader, the book will not trigger these emotions. I always remember the joke among our classmates while we were studying Maxwell's theory: "And God said... Maxwell's equations... and there was light". I even have a t-shirt with that joke! It summarizes the beauty of these discoveries. The book made me want to travel in time to see first hand how these discoveries were made!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Keith Aspinall on April 6, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The authors succeed at using the biographical details to describe the scientists manner of thinking, and in doing so convey perfectly the concepts that we know. A masterpiece on the initial development of electromagnetism!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Fezziwig on August 5, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This book is both a biography and the history of the development of an idea or, perhaps, a succession of related ideas. The two men, Michael Faraday (1791—1867) and James Clerk Maxwell (1831--1879), were together responsible for some of the greatest scientific discoveries in history: the relation between electricity, magnetism, and light and the discovery of something that cannot be known to the senses---the electromagnetic field. Although Faraday and Maxwell were separated by a generation and never worked together, this book makes it clear that their discoveries were a joint project.

The two men came from very different backgrounds. Faraday, the son of a blacksmith, had very little formal education. Early on, he became fascinated by electricity and magnetism and became convinced that there was some relation between the two forces. He educated himself by reading everything he could in those fields and in the field of chemistry and then devised experiments to further his understanding of matter and energy. He invented the first electric motor and the first electric generator and hypothesized the existence of an electromagnetic force field. His weakness in mathematics, a handicap imposed on him by his lack of formal education, made it difficult for him to advance his theories and have them appreciated by the scientific community of his time. But his strengths were his genius, dogged determination, and self-discipline. He recorded the details of every experiment and published the results---successes and failures alike. The publication of this work, "Experimental Researches in Electricity," would prove to be both the inspiriation for and foundation of the work of the next genius, James Clerk Maxwell.

Maxwell, unlike Faraday, was born into a social class of privilege.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A. Menon on May 17, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Faraday, Maxwell, and the Electromagnetic Field is a readable and engaging account of the two pioneers of the subject and how they developed as individuals and developed their respective theories. Electromagnetics and the field theory that came with it is one of the most important development in physics and allowed us to move from the theory of classical physics to what is today modern physics. Nancy Forbes and Basil Mahon give the reader an account of the evolution of thinking on the subject by writing the overlapping biographies of Faraday and Maxwell. It is engaging, readable and gives the reader a sense of the subject by discussing the physical results that both characters and in particular Faraday personally discovered.

In reading the book one gets a sense of the character of each and where there strengths and weaknesses lied. Faraday, born in 1791 was an incredible experimental physicist. He had the fortune early in his career to work with Davy who was a skilled experimenter as well. One gets a sense of the totally open nature of the subject during that era and how it was wide open to be explored. Faradays growing stature and influence is documented and the reader is familiarized with the deep insight Faraday had about discussing the phenomenon he was observing via a field theory rather than the action at a distance models that continental europe was focused on. The historical statements that are documented in the book give a sense of how visionary Faraday was. Despite his remarkable qualities as an experimental scientist he was not mathematically trained and the formalizing of the theory into something along the lines of newtons theory of classical mechanics was lacking. Maxwell, the Scottish prodigy, was to come along and bridge the gap.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews