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on May 10, 2015
I recommend the book, Farewell To God, as a worthy read. However, it has some shortcomings. I would have gone to 4-stars but for them.

Charles Templeton (1915-2001) was an evangelist who knew and worked with Billy Graham for a number of years, preaching to thousands at a time, thus, you would think with these creds, he would be well-versed in the specifics of the Holy Bible. But alas! I found a number of inexplicable errors in his narrative. He strikes me as being a bit dumb (for a preacher) as well as bitter, especially in several opening chapters.

1. I found NO citations, biblical or otherwise, in the whole book. None.
2. He claims “Lucifer” was “banished” from Heaven with some angels. The word “Lucifer” is found in one place in the entire Bible (Isa.14:12) and the name refers to the king of Babylon (v.4) and later context (p.99).
3. He refers to the ancient “Israelites” and “God’s Chosen People” as “Jews.” This cannot be more wrong. The Israelites consisted of 12 tribes, and only one tribe was named “Judah,” later referred to as “Jews” (pp.24, 26, 27, 33). Thus, the Israelites were NOT Jews, Moses was not a Jew, and so on. See Esther 2:5, first place “Jew” mentioned. Israelites were called “the House of Israel; same folks who came out of Egypt behind Moses.
4. He claims “every physicist in the world” that the Creation in 6 days “is nonsense.”
5. He claims “every geologist in the world” will attest to no global flood.
That's pretty loose of the "every's" which cannot be supported.

6. He claims to be an “agnostic,” and not an atheist. He defined an agnostic as a one who “cannot know” whether or not there is a God or First Cause, and, “on the basis of the evidence, the question is beyond resolution” (p.18). (He claims an Atheist simply asserts there is no God.) I disagree here. (A). an agnostic, I understand, is one who does not know one way or the other if there is a God.
(B). Mr. Templeton denies he is an atheist, but he is (first) an evolutionist, according to his own words: “The bones and musculature of humankind have evolved as they have in obedience to the law of gravity, the end result being able to stand upright, walk…” (p.19). He claims “it took billions of years for the universe,” etc., “to evolve to its present… form” (p.29, also pp.215, 217).

He is (second) an atheist according to his own words: “It was the efforts of men and women, not a mythical god, that made this a better world” (p.52). It is obvious there cannot be a loving God” (p.202). “I believe there is no supreme being with human attributes… that there is … a Life Force, a First Cause, a Primal Energy, a Life essence, … that the Life Force is not a being… that there is no Father in Heaven who can be persuaded by prayer… that there are millions of populated worlds in the universe… (p.232).

There is more, but all in all, besides Mr. Templeton’s obvious ignorance of some parts of the Bible (just as ignorant as are most Christians), he made good sense in a number of other chapters, taking Christianity and the Christian church to task over doctrines and dogma, as well as questioning the veracity of the Bible itself. He asks pointed questions that need to be answered by every professing Christian.

However, he gives no thought to design in nature, Intelligent Design (ID), or a God apart from the God he claims is depicted in the Bible. He mentions the Trinity as though it were biblical, which it is not, but I think a Christian reader would do well to buy this one and study the outstanding parts. He is right; the Bible has a lot of problems and contradictions; a loving God would never do what he is supposed to have done in the mythical book of Job, for instance. But to dismiss God and say “Farewell” to him because of what Christian churches believe and teach as "truth" or because of Christianity’s crazy dogma, is no reason to think that there is no God. Yahweh, the true singular God of Creation does exist; he just is not what people say or preach that he is. The creation proves a Creator.
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on February 15, 2015
It is O.K. nothing new but his view of religion and some good arguments.
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on February 2, 2015
CT seemed a little bitter and vengeful about being let down by hypocritical people, but I suppose if I was as deep into Christian ministry as he was and saw the things he saw, I would be disillusioned as well. Much of the objective reasons he gave for rejecting Christianity resonated with me deeply and this book did contribute to my leaving that faith. However, I don't see how atheism gives people "peace" in their world view. It's never been comprehensible to me how people can truly believe the inerrant scripture brand of Christianity or believe there is no God (prime mover or creative force). I guess I'm just an infant in the world of searching for something that makes enough sense to believe in.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful
on November 25, 2014
Kind of mind-blowing. You don't hear about this when discussions of Billy Graham occur, that's for sure...
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on October 5, 2014
Interesting reasons why he stop believing in God. I think he is wrong.
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on October 5, 2014
Clear and convincing
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1 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on September 20, 2014
The only somewhat interesting part of this book is the author's way-too-concise mention of his "friendship" and discussions with Billy Scam.

Templeton writes as if he's an expert on counter-apologetics, philosophy, and the god discussion, yet he repeatedly proves his own ignorance on the subject at hand (i.e. his failure to grasp the definitions of the words "atheist" and "agnostic"). It's almost painful to read this atheist-by-definition's incredibly ignorant anti-atheist rant.

Templeton should have just written about his experiences with Billy Scam; however, it seems obvious to me from his mentions of him in the book that he had reasons for withholding this most interesting information he had to offer the reader. I suspect he was either afraid of being sued, or he was protecting his scumbag ex-"friend" who valued money and power over friendship.
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on July 21, 2014
Not for the meek in faith. It will challenge your intellect, but not your faith. Only negative is that Charles and his editing staff did a poor job of listing their sources of information.
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on May 6, 2014
EXCELLENT RESOURCE
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1 of 5 people found the following review helpful
on April 10, 2014
The arguments presented in this book fall apart when a person considers that faith plays such an important role in christianity. The author has never come to grips with why he chose to fall away other than feeble attempts to explain away his lack of faith.
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