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Farewell My Lovely 1975 R CC

4.3 out of 5 stars (64) IMDb 7.2/10

A film noir remake of the Raymond Chandler novel 'MURDER, MY SWEET' originally made as a film in 1944.

Starring:
Robert Mitchum, Charlotte Rampling
Runtime:
1 hour, 36 minutes

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This movie is currently unavailable

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Product Details

Genres Thriller, Mystery
Director Dick Richards
Starring Robert Mitchum, Charlotte Rampling
Supporting actors John Ireland, Sylvia Miles, Anthony Zerbe, Harry Dean Stanton, Jack O'Halloran, Joe Spinell, Sylvester Stallone, Kate Murtagh, John O'Leary, Walter McGinn, Burton Gilliam, Jim Thompson, Jimmy Archer, Ted Gehring, Logan Ramsey, Margie Hall, Jack Bernardi, Bennett Ohta
Studio Lionsgate
MPAA rating R (Restricted)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

Format: DVD
That this film is not currently available on DVD is a dirty shame, as it is among Mitchum's best performances, certainly of his later career as a grizzled vet of the vestiges of life. The film-makers manage to effectively incorporate Mitch's advanced age into this fine adaption of Chandler's novel, giving the film a melancholy, borderline-nostalgiac feel. One can fantasize of John Huston directing Mitchum, say, twenty years earlier, but never mind: "Farewell" is a classic in its own right, benifiting from the success of Polanski's "Chinatown" and the baby boomer's appreciation of film noir and Bogart-era private-eye pictures. Excellent supporting performances abound: John Ireland (one of his best turns), Harry Dean Stanton (in a small role), Anthony Zerbe (before he became almost a cliche). Charlotte Rampling is a deliriously sexy mix of class and trash, and do not miss a couple of scenes with Mitchum and Sylvia Miles that are just perfect. Hey, that is none other than pulp-noir genius Jim Thompson in a tiny but memorable role. His one and only acting job allowed Thompson was able to get much-needed medical insurance.
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Format: Amazon Video Verified Purchase
Don't buy the video on demand version here--it's crappy pan and scan with heavily saturated color. I made the mistake of buying without checking the aspect ratio. iTunes has the widescreen version while we wait for the DVD/Blu-Ray to finally be released. This film deserves the full-on Criterion treatment.
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Format: DVD
If you know the story it doesn't matter. The moody noir atmosphere is everything in this film. It is the type of movie that can be viewed multiple times. The acting by the veteran actors are authentic for the period. The pacing is right on target and viewing this picture is like going back in a time machine. It captures a time and place in L.A. of the early forties and the story proceeds without any pretense or glamor. They must re-release this film at all costs.
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Format: DVD Verified Purchase
Robert Mitchum, Sylvia Miles, Charlotte Rampling, Harry Dean Stanton, Jack O'Halloran, John Ireland and Sylvester Stallone,among others - what a lineup. Of the entire genre of film noir, tough guy detective films, this one is by far the best. Mitchum is at his all time best, even though he's nearly sixty in this film (a bit old to play Marlowe, in my opinion, but he carries it off with absolute aplomb). He is the quintessential tough guy gumshoe Marlowe (he floors Dick Powell's previous characterization of the role), Sylvia Miles and Charlotte Rampling turn in flawless performances, and in fact Sylvia Miles received a well-deserved Oscar nod for hers. John Ireland and Harry Dean Stanton also gave marquee performances as well. Even young Sylvester Stallone is a surprise. But another one that stands out for me personally is the absolutely perfectly cast Jack O'Halloran as Moose Malloy. He plays the uber-big lunkhead looking for his girlfriend and I find myself caring for this character, following how the character develops and wanting to see the outcome for big Moose. O' Halloran did an outstanding job, playing Moose to spot-on realism and really filled in that dimension of the film for me. This film is a winner.
Comment 9 of 9 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
"Farewell My Lovely," based on the novel of the same name by famed hard-boiled detective author Raymond Chandler, a Californian,(Farewell, My Lovely),is set in the author's glamorous 1940's film noir Los Angeles. However, it was filmed, lavishly -- no stinting on any car or landmark -- in the Los Angeles of the 1970's, to be released in 1975. It was also filmed in color, the theory being that LA noirs may successfully be filmed in color. 1970's LA was then rather neo-noir itself, in the sour aftermath of the Manson family murders, and the Hell's Angels' murder at the Rolling Stones' Altamont concert. Quite a few neo-noirs were being filmed there and then, in color. "Farewell" is actually an English production. David Selag Goodman adapted the script, staying much closer to the novel than the original, 1944 adaptation,(Murder, My Sweet), starring Dick Powell. Jerry Bruckheimer gets a production credit on the movie; his touch might be seen in the open-handedness with which it's filmed, the well-orchestrated, swift-moving scenes of violence -- the whole movie clocks in at a quick 98 minutes-- and the all-star cast assembled for it.

The movie evokes its time: Joe DiMaggio's breathlessly followed 1941 hitting streak. And it succeeds in giving us a sense that December 7, 1941 is inevitably coming: "The day that will live in infamy," then President Roosevelt famously said. The day that began World War II, with the Japanese dawn bombing of Pearl Harbor, Hawaii, ( that's not so far from LA). The jazzy score is by David Shire.
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2 Comments 8 of 8 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: DVD
Please re-release this wonderful Robert Mitchum movie on DVD so that humble people such as myself can afford it minus the rip-off prices that the sellers are selling it for!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
1 Comment 10 of 11 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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Format: VHS Tape
Director Richard Rush presented us a valentine with this incredible film, the third version made from the the 1940 Raymond Chandler novel. At least seven actors have portrayed Philip Marlowe. Robert Mitchum, played the part twice. The first time, in this film, he was nothing short of brilliant; just world-weary, battered, meloncholy, and tough enough to spark this tale into a full flame. His voice-over narrative hit perfect pitch; all gravel, too many smokes, and cheap booze. Mitchum, himself the veteran of several Noir classics, played the gumshoe as comfortable as one's favorite overcoat; a perfect fit. He shuffled lazy-lidded yet irascible and alert, as ready for a sap behind the ear, as he was to be the recipient of the sexual energy radiated off of Charlotte Rampling as Helen, the femme. She, likewise, postured perfectly in the Noir 1940's clothes and hairstyles. John Alonzo, fresh from shooting CHINATOWN, presented us with an LA bathed in just the right mix of golden light and shadow. Jerry Goldsmith delivered another spectacular score, overlapping jazz, blues, and swing, underscoring the action and dialogue masterfully. John Ireland, also a veteran of classic Noir, Anthony Zerbe, and Harry Dean Stanton gave tremendous support with their roles. There was even a couple of glimpses of Sly Stallone ( pre-ROCKY ) as a viscious punk. Some of the critics felt that this lush color film had to try too hard for that Noir feel. I disagree. This movie is a modern Noir classic, even in living color.
3 Comments 21 of 28 people found this helpful. Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
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