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Product Details

  • Paperback: 152 pages
  • Publisher: CreateSpace Independent Publishing Platform (November 4, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1491029277
  • ISBN-13: 978-1491029275
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #293,291 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Kirkus Reviews

Meador (Medicine/Vanderbilt Univ.; True Medical Detective Stories , 2012, etc.) offers a pleasant set of anecdotes about puzzling symptoms and the work of the “physician detective.” Combining “fascinate” with the suffix “-oma” (which often designates a tumor), Meador coins a term for the medical conundrum of doctors being left stumped until a new piece of evidence comes to light. Yet the author insists that, when trying to understand an illness, getting to know a patient is just as important as grasping symptoms. Even a very careful doctor can overlook warning signs or fail to ask the right questions. The first of Meador’s patient sketches, all based on real cases shared by his colleagues, concerns a girl whose temporary paralysis was caused by a hidden tick bite—a diagnosis reminiscent of medical TV dramas like House or Scrubs . Other peculiar findings, related to Meador by his Vanderbilt colleagues or other doctors, involve typhus from rats, an allergy to yellow dye and carbon monoxide poisoning. Some patients cling to self-diagnoses despite their doctors’ opinions to the contrary; this is especially true of conditions with a psychological component, such as hypoglycemia and fibromyalgia. Simply having a name for an illness can function like a crutch that patients are reluctant to relinquish. At times, this self-definition can go further: In cases of Munchausen syndrome, patients keep themselves sick, perhaps by injecting wound sites with their own feces to induce infection. Asking simple questions and establishing rapport with even such self-deluded patients can give physicians an entrée into discussing underlying mental issues. Meador ends with what is perhaps the collection’s most bizarre story: A college senior developed lichen planus rash after drinking copious amounts of cinnamon schnapps, which contains gold flakes—his blood level of gold was 86 micrograms, compared to a normal level of less than 1 microgram. A few anecdotes would benefit from more detail, and the overall effect could be less provincial if Meador included tales from further afield. Many of his “characters” sound, perhaps unfairly, like ignorant country folks due to their transcribed Tennessee dialect and folksy names. A quick, enjoyable book of health-related who- and whatdunits.

About the Author

Biography of Clifton K.Meador, M.D. For over fifty years, Clifton K. Meador has been practicing and teaching medicine. This, his thirteenth book, complements his published writings and his well-known satiric articles noting the clinical excesses of modern American medicine, including “The Art and Science of Nondisease,” published in the New England Journal of Medicine (1965), “The Last Well Person” also in the New England Journal of Medicine (1994), “A Lament for Invalids” in the Journal of the American Medical Association JAMA 1992) and “Clinical Man: Homo Clinicus,” published in Pharos (2011). His last book True Medical Detective Stories (2012) was dedicated to Berton Roueche, writer for the New Yorker and creator of the genre of medical detective stories. A graduate of Vanderbilt University in 1955, Dr. Meador has served as executive director of the Meharry Vanderbilt Alliance since 1999, and is a emeritus professor of medicine at both Vanderbilt School of Medicine and Meharry Medical College. Past posts include chief of medicine and chief medical officer of Saint Thomas Hospital (then a major teaching hospital for Vanderbilt) and dean of the University of Alabama School of Medicine. Dr. Meador lives with his wife, Ann, in Nashville. He is the father of seven, and has seven grandchildren and one great granddaughter.

More About the Author

Cllfton Meador is a retired physician and professor of medicine emeritus at Vanderbilt Medical School. He is author of 13 books. His "Med School" is a year by year humorous and serious account of medical school in the 1950s. "True Medical Detective Stories" tells in detective fashion the story of 19 unusual cases. His latest book, "Fascinomas -fascinating medical mysteries" reports 35 medical mysteries shared by his colleagues from around the country. He has a fascination about the efffects of mind on body,psychosomatic diseases, and Voodoo hexing. The books emphasize the importance of careful listening and engaging the patient in the search for causes of illness.

Kirkus Reviews says, "A quick, enjoyable book of health-related who- and whatdunits."

www.cliftonkmeador.com

Customer Reviews

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I received a free copy of this book for an honest review.
Shirley Priscilla Johnson
A ‘Fascinoma’, as Meador defines, is medical slang for an unusually interesting medical case.
Grady Harp
This book has some very interesting stories that just make you wonder about people.
Lauren Nagel

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Paperback
Clifton K. Meador, MD has a gift for filtering through tales and ‘can you beat this one’ stories that are passed around doctors’ lounges and ORs and coming up with succinct but extremely entertaining stories. A ‘Fascinoma’, as Meador defines, is medical slang for an unusually interesting medical case. He has gleaned and collected and curated 35 such cases from his own experience and the experiences of colleagues who have given permission to re-tell their own blockbusters. Each case is reads like a short story – the presentation of a strange set of symptoms, the initial response of the examining doctor(s), gradual revelation of further symptoms (sometimes via revealed secrets from the presenting patient), and the final diagnosis. Fellow Physicians will find both hilarious entertainment along with some ‘aHa!’ moments that will sharpen their diagnostic acumen. For the general reader this book is not only entertaining but very informative about many aspects of the practice of medicine that should prove fascinating in the realm of Ripley’s Believe it or Not!Read more ›
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By Eric Naumann on March 27, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Heard about this on Doctor Radio on Sirius XM. This tome is a lot of fun; just some great cases that have been passed on by master clinicians with a lot of experience. These stories would make for a great grand rounds or case conference. Glad they were willing to pass on their wisdom.
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By Lauren Nagel on March 17, 2014
Format: Paperback
This book has some of the most interesting cases which are true medical mystery's that were all puzzling at first but eventually solved. This book has some very interesting stories that just make you wonder about people. I found the book fascinating but I didn't care much for the title that the author chose for the book. The stories are compelling and will leave you wanting more. This was an easy book to read because the stories are short and to the point. I hope Clifton K. Meodor writes some more books like this one because I enjoyed reading this one.
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By Leah on March 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Very interesting cases! Ups your game at differentials. Not the usual old saws, I hadn't heard these before. Well worth the quick read.
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Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I get a kick out of books like this. Meador is a physician who gathered stories from other physicians about cases they found perplexing. Usually these were cases of medical conditions that were so rare, they may of heard of them happening in school but would never see a case in real life. So when it actually happened, only those doctors who were really prepared actually would know what they were dealing with. Sometimes, cases were emerging diseases happening in this country...and the doctors who recognized them were from other countries. I'm afraid that's going to happen more often in the near future with the easy transportation of people from country to country.

Many times stories like these are 'Eureka' moments for both the physicians and the readers. Some of the cases I knew the answers before I got very far, others I didn't have the foggiest idea what the problem was. It is nice to pick up a book like this and learn something new that you didn't know before.

My big problem with this book was that many of these stories seemed a little old. I was expecting a few more recent stories in this compendium than were actually there. I'm hoping to find more recent stories in the future...
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By D. Hanavan on February 3, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
A 5 star fascinating journey through the mind and bodies of humans. We are such complex systems filled with amazing interlinking processes.
I was fortunate to hear a radio talk show with Dr Meador and couldn't wait to read his books. His writing is both tongue in cheek and scientifically accurate.
Truly enjoyable reading.
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