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Comment: Good++; Hardcover with Jacket; 2004, Palgrave MacMillan Publishing; Jacket is moderately shelfworn, but is otherwise clean and intact; Clean boards with minor edgewear; Pages clean & unmarked; Good binding with straight spine; White dust jacket with title in red and white lettering; 304 pages; "Fascism and Neofascism: Critical Writings on the Radical Right in Europe (Studies in European Culture and History)," by Eric Weitz & Angelica Fenner.
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Fascism and Neofascism: Critical Writings on the Radical Right in Europe (Studies in European Culture and History) Hardcover – November 11, 2004

ISBN-13: 978-1403966599 ISBN-10: 1403966591

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Product Details

  • Series: Studies in European Culture and History
  • Hardcover: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Palgrave Macmillan (November 11, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1403966591
  • ISBN-13: 978-1403966599
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 1 x 9.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #6,870,213 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Fenner and Weitz have put together an exciting collection of essays on Fascism and Neofascism. The contributions cover the entire spectrum of right-wing European experience in the twentieth century and recast the issue of Fascism with thought-provoking insights. They insist on the distinctive historical contexts of the interwar past and the present, but also highlight the common traits of radical nationalism. They bring out impressively the inventive and aggressive adaptation of old symbols and myths to new circumstances."--Michael Geyer, University of Chicago

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“Fenner and Weitz have put together an exciting collection of essays on Fascism and Neofascism. The contributions cover the entire spectrum of right-wing European experience in the twentieth century and recast the issue of Fascism with thought-provoking insights. They insist on the distinctive historical contexts of the interwar past and the present, but also highlight the common traits of radical nationalism. They bring out impressively the inventive and aggressive adaptation of old symbols and myths to new circumstances.”--Michael Geyer, University of Chicago

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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Andreas Umland on November 5, 2006
Angelica Fenner's and Eric D. Weitz's collection consists of fifteen largely high-quality papers on a broad variety of subjects linked to comparative fascist studies including conceptual issues, Nazi cultural and gender politics, Fascist style, Danish fascism, anti-immigrant violence today, the contemporary Romanian radical right, extremist youth in Germany, football hooligans in Yugoslavia, racist discourse in Scandinavia, the French extreme right, the Black Book of Communism, and the movie Otomo. While most of the papers are, by themselves, worth-reading, the editors' claim, in their introduction, that the question "to what extent [...] the contemporary right [is] linked to classical fascism" has been guiding the composition of the volume appears as an overstatement. Only some of the papers, such as Diethelm Prowe's, contribute to answering this question. The foci of the other contributions are too multifarious to provide more than a few separated pieces to a large puzzle; they make an assessment of the compilation difficult. The volume will be of interest to the highly specialized, and make good additional reading in seminars that provide much introductory literature with definitions of the central concepts and outlines of the historical context. On its own, however, the collection appears somewhat accidental.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Jan Peczkis on March 28, 2005
This book contains numerous articles, some of which present rarely-discussed information. For instance, modern treatments of Nazism focus on the Holocaust to the neglect (if not virtual forgetting) of their other victims. But clearly, this is a relatively recent development. In their article, Fenner and Weitz (p. 4) show that, during the first 20 or so years after WWII (1945-1965), German crimes against numerous peoples were considered (including, for example, the 2-3 million Poles murdered by the Germans, including the transparently genocidal destruction of nearly half of all educated Poles), with no inordinate attention given to the 5-6 million Jews. Now, according to Fenner and Weitz, Jewish sufferings have assumed a central element of public and popular culture in the West.

Attempts are sometimes made to link moral traditionalists in the West with Nazi attitudes towards sex. In a surprising article, Herzog demolishes this myth. He shows that, contrary to common perception, the Nazi movement was not repressive towards sex. In fact, it sneered at Christian morality much the same way that modern libertines and leftists do, and favored both premarital and extramarital sex. Attempts were made to discredit the Catholic Church by accusing priests in general of being homosexuals (sound familiar?). Much as modern feminists and other humanists, the Nazis accused Christianity of having a dislike for the human body and for showing disrespect towards women. This was supposed to be a carryover of "the Oriental attitude towards women."

In popular Holocaust materials, Danes are frequently honored for having saved their Jewish population by sending them across a strait to Sweden. The late columnist Ann Landers called the Danes "an amazing people".
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