Fat Angie and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.99
  • Save: $3.60 (21%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 6 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: There are no markings of any kind anywhere on book. Pages are in excellent condition - there is not a crease on any page. Dust cover and hard covers have just subtle and limited imperfections - they are almost like new. Binding is in excellent condition.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Fat Angie Hardcover – March 12, 2013


See all 8 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$13.39
$7.76 $5.19
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Fat Angie + Beautiful Music for Ugly Children
Price for both: $22.19

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Holiday Deals in Books
Holiday Deals in Books
Find deals for every reader in the Holiday Deals in Books store, featuring savings of up to 50% on cookbooks, children's books, literature & fiction, and more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Candlewick (March 12, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0763661198
  • ISBN-13: 978-0763661199
  • Product Dimensions: 5.6 x 0.9 x 8.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #151,935 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Gr 9 Up-A father who abandoned the family. A couldn't-be-bothered mother. An adopted brother who is a criminal in the making. A high school full of peers who relentlessly tease her following a failed suicide attempt at a basketball game. And the only person who really understands her-her older sister-is being held hostage in Iraq and is believed to be dead by everyone except Angie. This is Angie's life. Then a gorgeous, punk-rock chick with a mysterious past, KC Romance, begins taking an interest in her. While the teen toys with the idea that she may be "gay-girl gay," she also begins to channel her pain and uncertainty by making her sister, a former state champion, proud by trying out for the varsity basketball team. Not only does Angie make the team, but she also leads it to a pivotal win. She returns home from the game to discover that her sister's body has been found. An explosive confrontation with her mother following the burial leads her to begin to see her otherwise-cold mother through a new lens. The author ends the story with no resolution in Angie's relationships with her mother and KC, leading readers to forge their own conclusions. The voice of a dry and direct third-person narrator works in a story laden with heavy topics, including war, death, suicide, cutting, bullying, and homosexuality.-Nicole Knott, Watertown High School, CTα(c) Copyright 2013. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

Angie is fat. And miserable. And she has her reasons. Her sister, a star basketball player turned soldier, has been captured in Afghanistan. Everyone thinks she’s dead. Angie’s lawyer mother busies herself with work. Her adopted Korean brother busies himself being obnoxious. And Angie goes around wearing her sister’s too-small b-ball T-shirt, trying to stay out of the mean girls’ way. At one point, she tries to slit her wrists and comes out bleeding onto the basketball court. Then KC comes to town. Cool and cute, she makes a beeline for Angie and no one can figure out why (including the reader). But as the world turns, so do the pages, and Angie decides maybe she can play varsity basketball like her sister, and maybe she can have a “gay-girl-gay” relationship with KC—although KC’s cutting gets in the way. Some of the characters don’t push much beyond stereotype, but Angie’s anguish and the dysfunction of her family seem quite real. As the story spins toward its conclusion, elements may seem preordained, but the emotion with which they’re infused gives them new life. Grades 9-12. --Ilene Cooper

More About the Author

Director/Novelist/Rockstar In Training

A small-town Texas native, e.E. Charlton-Trujillo wanted to win an Oscar at the age of four and be the drummer for KISS. Her dreams would not be dashed. In 2014, she won a children's literature equivalent to an Oscar from the ALA (Stone Wall Award!) for her third novel FAT ANGIE. KISS is only a matter of time. #senseofhumor

A director of films and music videos, her unconventional book tour to empower youth on the fringe and documentary At-Risk Summer spawned the creation of the emerging Never Counted Out nonprofit. #changetheworld

Charlton-Trujillo won the prestigious Delacorte Dell Yearling Award for her first novel Prizefighter En Mi Casa which garnered a number of accolades. Her second novel, Feels Like Home, received critical praise and earned a host of awards. Her third novel, Fat Angie, releases through Candlewick in March 2013. Early buzz from authors Gregory Maguire (Wicked), Pat Schmatz (Bluefish) and Jo Knowles (Lessons From A Dead Girl) made Fat Angie the must read of 2013. #booksaboutfindingyourselfrock

Charlton-Trujillo has been featured on the Huffington Post, MTV, Publishers Weekly, School Library Journal and Kirkus Reviews. She is currently penning a film adaptation, writing three novels and completing post production on a Reality TV show pilot.

http://www.pinataproduction.com

Customer Reviews

The characters in this book will stay with you long after you have finished reading.
T. Geo
Anyone who has ever wanted to prove she is more than just what people think they know about her will hold Fat Angie close to her heart.
Angie
I believe that Fat Angie should be required reading for all who work with teens, and for teens too.
Marcia E. Wickes

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Marcia E. Wickes on March 19, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I believe that Fat Angie should be required reading for all who work with teens, and for teens too. It captures the heart of being different in high school, both the heart ache that it brings as well as the triumph of overcoming that adversity. If even one person can see you for what you really are, it frees you to see yourself that way too, and that is the first step to acceptance. This is a beautiful story, and a significant book. It will stand the test of time. I know because I am 59 years old and it spoke to the me that survived the nightmare of high school with the help of friends. I understand Fat Angie; I lived her pain. To see a book that does not dwell on self pity but rather focuses on the joy of never giving up and not giving in, to see that nonconformity is not a sin and should not feel the need to be forgiven, is wonderful. I highly recommend this book. It's stunning. My deepest gratitude to the author for planting this beacon of hope to all of us who work with kids and want so very deeply for them to survive intact and unique, as beautiful as we know they can be.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Anoek van Troy on March 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
When I started reading "fat angie" it took me a few pages to find narrator's voice, but once I did, I didn't put the book down until I finished it. This is a story about pain and suffering that comes from bullying, but to just call it a book about bullying would be selling it short. The parts about the bullying are harsh, raw and hard, somehow though I felt the cold distanced contempt of Angie's mom, the most painful.
It's a story about people showing up, the coach an unexpected friend and of course romance.
in Fat Angie the romance part comes from KC Romance, the new girl in town. The fact that is a "gay-girl gay", as both girls call it, romance adds a little extra dimension to the book, but it's more about the emerging romance, that first doubt, that first kiss and it just happens to be two girls that fall in love.
Fat Angie is about of doubts, about love, about coming of age. Fat Angie is struggling with who you are, who you want to be, about finding perfection in imperfection. Fat Angie is about bravery and fear and I loved it.
I found this on youtube and love it (it's a phoetus .. lol) [...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By c. gordon on March 13, 2013
Format: Hardcover
From the first short, sharp sentence, FAT ANGIE takes the reader on a harrowing tumble into modern adolescence. Fraught with tension and carried along by wickedly smart dialog, ANGIE snares the reader into her painful world: a can't-be-bothered mother, a sister who's gone missing in Iraq, a brother who torments her, and relentless, ongoing bullying that always lands just under the radar. Small wonder Angie doesn't trust those rare few, Like Coach Laden or her neighbor Jake, who try to reach out to her. That is, until KC Romance comes along and rocks Angie's world. Will KC be Angie's salvation - or her downfall? FAT ANGIE is a stand-out in YA lit, and destined to be a classic.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By nancy richardson on March 26, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Fat Angie is so much more than a book about bullying. It's more than a book about loss. And it's more than a book about self-discovery. It's a cautionary tale about what happens to the people left behind in war and an illustration of the disconnect that occurs in families suffering through intense grief.

The subject matter is raw at times, the approach unblinking, but there's an undercurrent of hope in the face of daunting situations and against sizeable odds that makes Fat Angie a joy to read.

And in case this review sounds too dark, let me add (without spoilers) that there are Hoosier-type moments and a quirky version of happily ever after, too:-)

Thank you for a great read!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Yankeelin on July 28, 2013
Format: Hardcover
" There was a girl. Her name was_______. She was fat."

Fill in the blank yourself. In the book her name is Angie but it could be any one of us. Fat? Freak? Nerd? Introvert? Zits? Un-cool clothes?
There are several reviews that give story details so i won't be redundant.
Whether or not you like Angie, KC, or any other character is NOT the point. It's the hurt that each and every one of us carry no matter what our outer packaging is. Acknowledge it in yourself and accept it in others. How simple right? How very tough in actuality.
Fat Angie is dealing with school snot-rag biatches, her weight, her not-there mother, her sister in Iraq, basketball try-outs, and her new friend who makes her wonder about her "gay girl-gay" feelings. Mix it all in with the usual teenage angst and voila.

I agree with the reader thatsaid this book should be required reading. Maybe summer before high school reading... Let's bring some awareness and open some young minds eh??
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By cr_texas on May 13, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Not going to lie, this book did make me feel better about my high school experience. The book was pretty cliche and unrealistic. I wish it would have been written in first person. I did like that it's a stand alone book. Too many books these days are series.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Heidi Richmond on April 6, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is clearly written by someone older trying to sound like a teenager. That being said, I did enjoy this book and loved the message within. I do think after a certain age this book becomes less relevant, but it was good and I would recommend it to any teenager.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Angela M. Martin on October 8, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
Well written and full of heart, this story captures the struggles faced in schools across the nation. I read it, my kids read it, I passed it on to friends. Excellent author, full of heart.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?