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Fat Fast Cookbook: 50 Easy Recipes to Jump Start Your Low Carb Weight Loss
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84 of 87 people found the following review helpful
on February 16, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Dr. Atkins popularized the Fat Fast, based on the Keckwick diet developed in the 1950s by Prof. Alan Keckwich and Dr. Gaston Pawen. Fat fasting forces the body to burn stored fat by depriving it of glucose (sugar). Since even protein can be partially converted to glucose via a process called gluconeogenesis, eliminating almost everything but fat guarantees that even those who are most metabolically resistant to weight loss will switch to burning fat rather than sugar. By limiting calories to 1,000 per day, stored fat will make up the difference between the dietary fat coming in and energy needs.

You might think that eating a diet that is 90% fat would take a lot of discipline. You may even doubt that you can do it. This book will change your mind. While Dr. Atkins suggested five feedings a day of things like "two egg yolks with a tablespoon of mayonnaise," "two ounces of cream cheese," or "one ounce of macadamia nuts," Dana Carpender and the CarbSmart team have cooked up some recipes that are rich, interesting, varied, and very filling. You can enjoy some really tasty treats that will keep hunger at bay while you rev up your metabolism with the magic of nutritional ketosis.

Some, like Mac and Cheese, Fettuccine with Pancetta Cream, and Curried Coconut Cream of Chicken Soup, will make you feel like you've had a full meal. There are also plenty of treats here, Pumpkin Pie and Chocolate Cheese Mousse, for example.

These are recipes that you will continue to make long after you have reached your ideal weight. For some of you, just replacing one meal a day with a fat-fast dish may be enough to keep your metabolism in a happy place. I've opted for Keto Coffee (actually I do Keto Mocha) for breakfast, which may provide the same anti-aging, anti-cancer, and other benefits as intermittent fasting, while also helping with weight maintenance. (And one less meal a day to prepare!)

If you want to lose weight without losing muscle, if you need to break a weight-loss stall, if you want to turn your body into a fat-burning machine, the 50 recipes in The Fat Fast Cookbook can start the fire.

Judy Barnes Baker, author of "Nourished; a Cookbook for Health, Weight Loss, and Metabolic Balance"
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99 of 106 people found the following review helpful
Format: Kindle Edition
FULL DISCLOSURE: I am one of the contributors to some of the content used and a contributing writer to CarbSmart who published this book.

Since May 2012, I have personally been engaged in an n=1 self-experiment of a concept known as "nutritional ketosis." This phrase to describe the very healthy state of generating ketone bodies as an alternative fuel source to glucose in the body has been used quite prominently in a series of books (namely New Atkins for a New You,The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Living and The Art and Science of Low Carbohydrate Performance) in recent years and it has rekindled interest in a concept that was first promoted by the late, great Dr. Robert C. Atkins of Dr. Atkins' New Diet Revolution fame.

If you've ever read Dr. Atkins' books, then you know he advocated for and pushed this thing called the "fat fast" which is a very high-fat, moderate protein, very low-carbohydrate nutritional approach. The purpose of this was as a means for kicking your weight (and more appropriately your stored body fat) loss program into high gear by pressing the issue about fueling your body on ketones instead of glucose (sugar). Sometimes certain people are so insulin resistant that they need this extra oomph to get them going. Getting into a genuine state of ketosis and not just cutting carbs is the real key in all of this.

That's where the FAT FAST COOKBOOK enters the scene to help you do just that!

One of the primary writers of this book certainly needs no introduction to the low-carb community. She is bestselling author Dana Carpender who has been at this for a very long time as she first shared about in her low-carb weight loss success book How I Gave Up My Low-Fat Diet and Lost 40 Pounds. Dana has gone on to carve out quite a niche for herself for more than a decade as the veritable "Queen Of Low-Carb Cooking" in books like 500 Low-Carb Recipes,1,001 Low-Carb Recipes and her latest 500 Paleo Recipes. In the FAT FAST COOKBOOK, she teams up with two more mainstays in the low-carb community in Amy Dungan from the "Healthy Low-Carb Living" blog and Rebecca Latham from the "My Low Carb Road To Better Health" blog to teach others about why eating more fat and less carbs is an optimal way to get into the healthy state of nutritional ketosis to experience not just weight loss, but some of the most incredible health you have ever experienced in your life.

I've seen that for myself eating this way losing over 70 pounds in just 10 months, lowering my blood sugar levels and A1c into the normal range, improving my cholesterol panel, never feeling hunger or cravings, attaining a sharp mental focus (your brain prefers to be fueled by ketones by the way!), feeling super-strong and recovering well after workouts and ENERGY ENERGY ENERGY galore (did I mention I have ENERGY?). Although I've been eating low-carb and have experienced tremendous success with it losing 180 pounds in 2004, it wasn't until I honed in on the proper level of fat, protein and carbohydrates that was right for my body that I was able to experience the real benefits of livin' la vida low-carb. Too many people just want to go on some diet they saw a celebrity do and think they will have the same results. Not necessarily. That's why you have to tinker and tweak what you are doing until you find the right plan for you. Nutritional ketosis could be that pathway that you've been looking for if everything else has failed you.

The FAT FAST COOKBOOK is an excellent resource in the kitchen for anyone attempting to eat a low-carb diet a la getting into nutritional ketosis. If you don't know what that is just yet, that's okay--all of it is explained within the pages of this book in clear language that anyone can understand. Plus, one thing you can always count on with Dana Carpender is she is gonna hook you up with some amazing recipes--and you get plenty of them in this book of recipes! Since I began my n=1 nutritional ketosis experiment in 2012, people have been asking me to share some great high-fat, low-carb recipes with them--HERE YA GO! Now you have it all in one place. Get this book and start reaping all the incredible benefits that nutritional ketosis has to offer you.
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84 of 91 people found the following review helpful
on February 20, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
Having a very insulin resistant body,low fat low calorie diets never work for me.Low carb diets did work until a short while ago.Losing the last 40 pounds has been gruelling,and I had put on weight despite being very low carb.Thats when the idea of Nutritional Ketosis made sense.I have tried several diets before and none of them worked ,leaving me desperate.Increasing the fat,moderating the protein and keeping carbs under 20 grms from low impact veggies has made all the difference in the world.I can lose only on fat fasting and a level slightly above it.Any higher I go,I stop losing.Being so metabolically resistant,I knew Fat fast and Extended Fat Fast is the way to go,but I wanted some variety than eating blocks of cream cheese or macadamia nuts.
Thats when this book comes handy,and I had been waiting for it so long.This book contains 50 recipes.One good thing is that it contains several veggie dishes including a fat fast salad,other veggies and soup.Those were the items I missed on fat fasts.I also wish they had more recipes.
It also contains some useful info on fat fasting.For many people,doing a fat fast will truly get them into ketosis.Other low carb diets and so called ketogenic diets may or may not,depending on your body's resistance.I saw recipes that contains potatoes,dates or honey in cookbooks claiming to promote themselves as ketogenic.A true ketogenic diet induces ketosis, as can be tested using keto strips from sample blood,not urine.
Also more and more research emphasises the theraupatic effects of truly ketosis inducing diets for cancer,alzheimers,epilepsy,neuro-related,tumors,autism ,fibromalgia,diabetes and so much more modern civilisation diseases.
Now the part we were lied to- I mean we have been told for half a century that dietary fat is bad and we should be eating more and more carbs and low fat.Well finally research is pointing in the other direction.fat is not the monster,carbs,startches and sugar are.Humans were not designed to ingest heavy loads of carbs.And this little cookbook hopefully paves the way to more healthful eating.
And to the authors,please come up with more recipes,we need them
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32 of 37 people found the following review helpful
on January 21, 2014
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I'd hit a weight plateau with a fairly low-carb, whole foods approach, and happened across Dana Carpender's Fat Fast Recipes. Thought it was worth a try - no gimmicky food, just macronutrient proportions and calorie restriction to kick start your body into deep ketosis and fat loss. It's low calorie (~1000-1200/day), high fat, low protein, and very low carb - 20 or less grams a day. It's only recommended for the short term - three to five days. You eat five "feedings" every 3-4 hours rather than the traditional three "meals" a day. Recipes and "non-recipes" are provided (e.g., portions of high-fat nuts as a feeding) to implement the plan.

Carpender issues warnings that a fat fast is only recommended for people already doing Atkins maintenance-level or equivalent carb intake, and that you should not go from a SAD (standard American diet) to a fat fast. Also that diabetics need to have their meds very closely monitored to do this, if at all.

Unless I missed it, one caution she did NOT include, which I saw as a flaw and why I gave it three stars, is revealed in my experience doing the Fat Fast and my subsequent research, explained in detail below. The short version is that I experienced rather severe heart palpitations after two days of following the program and that this is a documented reaction to extreme carb restriction. Documented but unfortunately unknown to me before this.

On the plus side, however, for people who have no problem going very low carb (VLC), this book provides a variety of tasty recipes that make you feel like you're eating real food instead of doing some weird crazy diet thing, because, well, you are for the most part. Eating real food. (Okay, the fat/protein/carb proportions may be just a little...extreme). The dessert-type recipes all include artificial sweeteners, which turns me off, but she addresses this acknowledged criticism with a "take `em or leave `em" admonition. Plenty of other recipes to choose from, so not a problem.

The detail on my experience (it's not long, just comprehensive ; ) I've been eating whole foods, pretty low carb for over a year (close to most primal/paleo templates), am not diabetic or even close, so didn't think there would be any problem diving right in to a fat fast. What's to lose but a few pounds and possibly getting my body back to better fat burning, I reasoned. And I already had most of the ingredients needed, so no big $ investment, either.

Day one I felt a little low energy and hungry, but as described in the book, these were just adaptation symptoms that would pass in a few days. Day two I felt worse and very hungry. Then I woke up in the middle of night two with crazy heart palpitations that wouldn't stop to the point of feeling nauseous. I got up and ate a little salt and whole milk yogurt and that seemed to calm them down enough to let me get back to sleep. In the a.m., though, still palpitations.

A quick consult with Dr. Google produced many references to VLC and palpations - both mainstream (WebMD-type) and downstream (mostly paleo/primal blogs). Resulting in relief (I'm not dying) and a big aha moment. Last year I went through a period doing really low carb, though not as low as Fat Fast. I was having intermittent palpitations, but thought it was due to a stressful work environment as I had no history of the condition, am very healthy otherwise, and not overweight. Went to the doc - everything checked out okay (like others experiencing this reported). Eventually they stopped, just as eventually I changed my diet to include more quality carbs, thought I didn't make the connection at the time.

I didn't get a sense from my (limited) research on VLC/palpitations what proportion of the population who qualify to do the Fat Fast per Carpender's guidelines would be affected, but the fact that it's mentioned in conventional and non-conventional health arenas tells me it's a warning that justified a sentence or two in Carpender's book. Maybe if I could have endured the discomfort of the palpations I might have made it over the hump and become a fat burning machine sans palpitations, but I wasn't willing to wait around to find out. If you've never had palpitations, they are quite uncomfortable and more than a little scary.

I think a less radical approach for "using fat to burn fat" is Eat Fat, Lose Fat: The Healthy Alternative to Trans Fats. Whole food, balanced approach, relying on the miracles bestowed by coconut oil to make a more gradual transformation. (Add cod liver oil, and you're practically indestructible.)

For those who like a happy ending, upon returning to my regular diet on day three - a slightly lower carb version of the Nourishing Traditions: The Cookbook that Challenges Politically Correct Nutrition and the Diet Dictocrats philosophy - the palpitations disappeared and I felt much better. Thanks for asking.

So now I know severe carb restriction is not for me and maybe not for many, and that I need to look elsewhere to help find my "sweet spot." Makes one long for the days of small communities that ate the same food for generations and managed to propagate the species on it. None of this searching and questioning about what to eat to be healthy, as so wonderfully articulated in The Omnivore's Dilemma: A Natural History of Four Meals.

I guess that's why I lean toward the Nourishing Traditions philosophy for guidance. (Warning: editorial coming, stop if you don't want my opinion). It focuses on the wisdom of traditional foods and food prep methods that sustained cultures for eons around the world. Makes a little more intuitive sense to me than the paleo/primal theories, though I don't discount their merits. We may be "paleo" underneath it all, but it's hard for me to fathom that we survived as a species as we veered from our Paleolithic diet of yore if we didn't adapt and thrive despite the changes. I expect paleo/primal devotees will jump on "thrive." I know and understand that argument, but as a species you have to admit we have pretty much come to dominate the planet (with the exception of the microbes) despite the less-than-optimal changes in health agriculture brought. Leaving aside our current plummet to destruction if we don't change what we eat. Anyway, just sayin'. Y'all find your own way. No food nazi stuff going on here. Just sharing an opinion. Not trying to start an avalanche of responses in defense of p/p, especially since I agree with many of their premises. Plus, I warned you to stop if you didn't want my opinion ; )

Good health to all, however you get there. And pass the sauerkraut!
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful
on February 18, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I've been waiting to see Dana's Fat Fast cookbook, and this does seem to have enough recipes to keep me interested. Many are similar to things I've come up with on my own, but others are new twists that give me new ideas to think about. My biggest issue with it is that it is Kindle-only. I'm the sort of person who CANNOT do Kindle cookbooks. I need to have cookbooks I can open and thumb through and write lots of notes in the margins. So for this cookbook to be *truly* useful I'll have to find a way to print stuff out - a bit of a pain but I will have to do it at some point if I really want to use this cookbook. But I admit I don't really like stuff printed on standard printer paper either, :-). Only other issue is that lots of recipes use the microwave, and I got rid of my microwave years ago and plan never to own one again - so again I'll have to adapt the recipes. But also not that big a deal I imagine, and just having 50 fat-fast recipes in one places is so useful to have.

To the reviewer who gave it 3 stars - I can understand some of your points. But to many people something like shiritaki noodles, peanut butter and soy sauce *is* a great recipe to learn of! Does it all have to be totally "original" unlike any recipe ever seen before? I make shirtaki noodles with PB and soy sauce a lot and have for a long time. It's one of my "fave" recipes, but I don't mind seeing someone else's twist on it. :-)

I do agree with that reviewer that there is not a lot of new "content" in the book as far as the non-recipe writing goes. But I have not eagerly awaiting the book for that content. In fact I just totally skipped over all the verbiage in the book as that was not at all of interest to me. I wanted the book to see what variety of recipes there were, and I'm not disappointed, other than wishing there were 100 recipes rather than 50, LOL.

BTW, I agree with Dana on the no xylitol. I have a dog too, and the amount of xylitol that can kill a dog is pretty darn small! I've already dealt once with the rush to the emergency vet for a stomach pump after my dog got into a product I'd bought and had accidentally picked one up that contained xylitol (my bad rushing at the supermarket). But other sweeteners are a personal choice, and as Dana says, if you don't want to use them then don't do it. :-) But it's nice to see a variety of savory AND sweet recipes in this book. I would happily have paid more for this book to get it in a hardcopy version.
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14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I have successfully used many of these delicious recipes for jump-starting myself back into ketosis and for continued weight loss. The beauty of this e-book is that everything you need is all in one place: a fat-fast how-to, an ingredient explanation, and a wide selection of single-serving recipes and other ideas with nutritional information. All of the recipes I've tried are delicious, quick, and hit the spot: Boursin stuffed mushrooms, pepperoni/cream cheese, butter roasted pecans, and mac & cheese and fettuccine alfredo(I make mine with kelp noodles). A must-have for any low-carb cookbook collection.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on April 23, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
I did have this buried in the comment section of another reviewer's review, but I felt it was important to make it more conspicuous. I totally agree with another reviewer about her calculations being off in most of the recipes I have tried. Especially, "Coconut Flax Bread." Macronutrients given for 1 slice from a 20 slice loaf is NOT 111 calories; 9g fat; or 1g usable carbs. I entered the exact amounts going by her 9.5 ounces/4 cups, according to Ms. Carpender, of unsweetened shredded coconut (all brands caluculated exactly and matched up--I checked my own packages (two different brands) plus online databases to assure that my calculations were correct), flaxseed meal--everything. My calculations came out to 120 calories; 7.5g fat; and 6.7g usable carbs! Instead of the supposed 73% fat percentage (without butter), it comes out to 56% fat!!! My Paleo Bread recipe that I developed has better ratios than this bread.

Another recipe I tried that was off was the "Fat Fast Mac-and-Cheese." Nutrition Info was supposed to be 339 calories; 33g fat; 2g usable carbs, instead it was 375.5 calories and 4g usable carbs. This is totally unacceptable when you are being very precise with calories and macronutrients, as you should be when fat fasting (unlike Induction, there is a 1,000 calorie a day limit). I have spent several hours working on these calculations. I shudder to think I will need to recalculate the rest of the recipes in this collection because someone dropped the ball on this one.

Update: Well, I am shuddering. I have had to recalculate EVERY recipe because ALL of them have been totally off. Just did Fettuccine with Pancetta Cream, 290 calories instead the stated 207 calories! 25.5g fat instead of the stated 19g fat! 7g protein instead of the stated 9g; 2.5g usable carbs instead of the stated 1g usable carbs. I am using ALL of the recommended ingredients that she lists (House Foods brand shirataki, Philadelphia cream cheese, etc.). I am also entering them exactly as written by the author (weights, measurements, etc.) in a recipe analysis database. I'm entering everything by hand from the packages as of today 4-22-13 (as you know, manufacturers change their nutrition facts periodically, but it's usually sodium content). This book was just released, so it's unlikely the nutrition facts have been changed since publishing. I can't believe that I would be totally off on my daily totals if I had followed the stated calories and macronutrients. The other thing that really bothers me--there is no consistency with measurements or packaging. For instance, "1 packet tofu shirataki fettuccini [sic]," well, one package contains 2 servings (8oz package). Does she mean the whole 8 ounces or 4 ounces. *Ms. Carpender has clarified this in the comments.*

What is so sad is that the recipes are REALLY good (that's why I am giving the book 4 stars), but if you can't trust the nutrition facts, that blows the whole thing, IMHO. I have better things to do than have to recalculate all of these recipes. I should ask for my money back, or get paid for recalculating every recipe that I have used. At this writing, 10 recipes. Yikes, there's 50 recipes in this book.

Last Update: I never heard back from Dana after she commented on my review. I have updated my rating to 5 stars. I am still getting inconsistent nutrition ratios from the sources I have been using, so I will defer to Ms. Carpender's source (MasterCook) for her calculations. Just a word of warning about following her calculations to the letter, though, if you are closely watching calorie counts and finding you are not getting the results you expect.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on February 19, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
I had already read a lot of this info as I subscribe to Carb Smart and Livin La Vida Low Carb but its all put together in one place here. For anyone not familiar with this topic,this is a food start. The recipes seem to be heavy on the sweet treats but there are some good ideas here.
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29 of 35 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2013
Format: Kindle EditionVerified Purchase
While I enjoy going through cookbooks for interesting recipes to try, it is a rare thing indeed when a cookbook offers enough information to keep me up reading into the wee hours of the morning.

This ibook offers up some great information on why a fat fast may be appropriate for you, the science behind it, and, of course, an array of recipes that can get you started--and get your through--your fat fast with a minimum of fuss. It's an easy way of pulling it off without having to resort to plugging all the nutritional information in and figuring out the percentages on your own.

So far I've tried one recipe for fat bombs, and they are really good, as well as convenient.

It is well worth the price.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
on February 17, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition
A Must-have addition to my Low Carb Library! I have most of Dana Carpenders books, and this one is as well written and presented as all her others! Thanks!
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