Customer Reviews


102 Reviews
5 star:
 (43)
4 star:
 (35)
3 star:
 (15)
2 star:
 (5)
1 star:
 (4)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


70 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little info, no spoilers
First, let me say that I enjoyed this book and think it is a good and appropriately epic, if still open-ended, end to the Ringworld and Fleet of Worlds series. The only thing that I disliked was that the two main story lines stayed very separate from each other and did not feel connected. I wanted to read them both, but, as it was, it read a bit more like two separate...
Published 22 months ago by Amazon Customer

versus
17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Place to Enter Known Space
For more than 40 years, Larry Niven has been writing Known Space stories. Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld reaches back to plot threads from some of the very earliest short stories and, like the earlier Fleet of World stories, weaves them into the tale of what happened after the conclusion of Ringworld's Children and the plot twists at the end of Betrayer of...
Published 22 months ago by James D. DeWitt


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

70 of 70 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A little info, no spoilers, September 6, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
First, let me say that I enjoyed this book and think it is a good and appropriately epic, if still open-ended, end to the Ringworld and Fleet of Worlds series. The only thing that I disliked was that the two main story lines stayed very separate from each other and did not feel connected. I wanted to read them both, but, as it was, it read a bit more like two separate stories that were being told in the same book, rather than a single story with multiple viewpoints. Again, since this is Niven and Lerner, both stories are great, so the overall experience is great and the book is rewarding.

I also felt like it could be a stand alone book, but, to get the full enjoyment from it, you should read the previous Fleet of Worlds books (at least Destroyer and Betrayer) and the Ringworld books (at least Ringworld's Children).

I find it handy to have the series information available in the review and it can be hard to really see on the Amazon site, here is a snippet from Wikipedia, showing the order of the books in the Fleet of Worlds series and the Ringworld series:

Fleet of Worlds (2007)
Juggler of Worlds (2008)
Destroyer of Worlds (2009)
Betrayer of Worlds (2010)
Fate of Worlds

Ringworld (1970)
The Ringworld Engineers (1980)
The Ringworld Throne (1996)
Ringworld's Children (2004)

Additionally, there is all of Known Space in Niven's list of works and a number of those contain the original stories that are rehashed in Fleet of Worlds and other fun and fantastic stories that fill the Known Space universe to the brim.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


17 of 17 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars No Place to Enter Known Space, September 16, 2012
By 
James D. DeWitt "Alaska Fan" (Fairbanks, AK United States) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld (Hardcover)
For more than 40 years, Larry Niven has been writing Known Space stories. Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld reaches back to plot threads from some of the very earliest short stories and, like the earlier Fleet of World stories, weaves them into the tale of what happened after the conclusion of Ringworld's Children and the plot twists at the end of Betrayer of Worlds (Fleet of Worlds). It's an okay story, although the ending has been telegraphed by "Ringworld's Children." But it's absolutely not the place to start exploring Known Space.

As told in Niven's Ringworld's Children, the Ringworld is gone, snatched from the increasingly dangerous Fringe War before it might have been destroyed. Louis Wu and the Puppeteer we know as Hindmost escaped (or perhaps were permitted to escape). The various species involved in the Fringe War, frustrated by the disappearance of the prize, turn their collective attention instead to the Puppeteers' migration, the Fleet of Worlds, with deadly intent. And the Puppeteers themselves are weakened and divided, as well as famously being cowards.

It's a possible conclusion to both the Ringworld series and the Fleet of Worlds series, although it doesn't have to be. And while it suffers from some logical flaws and more than a bit of ret-conning, on the whole it is a satisfactory, if not surprising, conclusion. There are still any number of loose ends: most of the Protector exodus from the Core is still out there. We still don't know what happened to Carlos Wu. The two new sets of aliens - one introduced in Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld are still Out There.

Other reviewers have provided a suggesting reading list to work through before undertaking Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld. It's probably a good idea. Otherwise, you risk being completely baffled. Not Niven's best; not even the best of the Fleet of Worlds stories. But a good yarn for those who know the turf.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


31 of 36 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars A Good WrapUp, August 31, 2012
By 
wbentrim (Bucks County, PA) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)   
This review is from: Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld (Hardcover)
Fate of Worlds by Larry Niven and Edward M. Lerner

I read Ringworld in the early 1970's and frankly I know I liked it as I ranked it as an E for excellent in my book database but beside the basic premise, I don't remember a great deal. This book would have served me better 20 years ago. As is it gathers together the characters from several books and a couple of series and attempts tie them together under the label of the Known Earth Series.

Frankly I'm not sure this was a wrap up and not a precursor to a new series. The number of variables, races, venues and philosophies strains my recollection. I have only read 28 of Niven's books and have uniformly enjoyed them. Sadly I didn't really enjoy this because I have just enough recollection of the players but have trouble remembering the game they played. Some reviews I read stated it stands alone well, I would disagree and feel at least brushing up on the precursors would make the book more compelling.

I would recommend either going to Wikipedia and brushing up on background or tracking down all the books and reading them.
From Wikpedia:
* 1970: Ringworld
* 1980: The Ringworld Engineers
* 1996: The Ringworld Throne
* 2004: Ringworld's Children
* 2012: Fate of Worlds (by Niven and Edward M. Lerner)
Five prequels have been written, set in the same Ringworld universe, and written in collaboration:
* 1988-2009: Man-Kzin Wars (by various edited by Niven)
* 2007-2011: Fleet of Worlds (by Niven and Edward M. Lerner)
* 2008-2009: Juggler of Worlds (by Niven and Edward M. Lerner)
* 2009-2010: Destroyer of Worlds (by Niven and Edward M. Lerner)
* 2010-2011: Betrayer of Worlds (by Niven and Edward M. Lerner)

I did enjoy the books when I read them and if it had been more recently I am sure I would have enjoyed this book more. I do recommend the Niven style of creating warm, memorable characters.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5 of 5 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Sequels suffer from Idea Rot, September 22, 2012
By 
Gordon Bamber (Tenerife, Spain) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
Niven's early short stories and novels were a delight to read, with novel ideas and concepts popping out of the pages.

Fate of Worlds is a novel that that is strangled by all the other themed predecessors, and thus somewhat disappointing. The big ideas and insights of Known Space and Ringworld have already been stated, and this novel has the flavour of wringing them as dry as possible.

I will await a new Niven novel based on a novel theme - if he chooses to write one.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Fairly well written, September 7, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As a lifelong Niven fan I am somewhat dissappointed in this book. While I still enjoyed reading it, the least several books - those with Learner, have seemed to me geared to setting up the next book rather than purely for telling the story.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


8 of 10 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars A good end to this series, October 17, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
I'm not sure why I've read this entire series; I think I kept _hoping_ it'd come alive the way Niven's original Ringworld books did. For me, this never happened with the Worlds series. Sometimes, _almost_, but usually _not quite_.
I really, really like the science in this series. The Puppeteer characters are OK. The humans, not so much. I come away with the feeling that the series had been storyboarded, and the authors just pushed the characters around the board to get to the end.
Bottom line, don't expect anything wonderful from this book. It may be the weakest of the series, and the series wasn't all that strong to begin with. It's nice to know how everything all came out, but I wanted to find out more as an intellectual exercise than one of enjoyment. In most of these books, I've had to push myself to keep on reading, and this last work is no different. My overwhelming emotion is, I'm glad this series is over.
The book is only worth your money and your time if for some reason the series has a hold on you, and if the series _does_ have a hold on you, this won't be the highlight.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Excellent "ending" to the series, July 6, 2013
By 
K. Watanabe (San Francisco, CA United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
As a long-time Larry Niven fan, the entire "Fleet of Worlds" series has been like an excursion back to the early Known Space stories. Known Space is a future history created by Niven, encompassing a large collection of novels and short stories. When I was much younger, I read every Known Space book and short-story collection I could find.

I have NOT been a big fan of Larry Niven collaborations, except for the books (not Known Space) with Jerry Pournelle, which are mostly excellent. However, Niven and Edward M. Lerner make an excellent team. It seems to me like

Old(er) Larry Niven + Lerner = Young(er) Larry Niven

Of the books in the "Fleet of Worlds" series, the first and last (this book) are the best. This book would not be a good read as a stand-alone novel. There is too much "backstory" leading to this story.

If you are new to Niven, read "Ringworld" first; it's perhaps Niven's best known work, published way back in 1970. Then read "Protector." They are both excellent novels, and provide introductions to the key alien races. There are many other novels and short stories from the Known Space universe (including the other Ringworld novels), but at that point (if you like what you have read so far), you can begin the "Fleet of Worlds" series. If you plan to read the other Ringworld novels, read those immediately BEFORE starting on "Fate of Worlds."

The Ringworld novels are (in order):
Ringworld
The Ringworld Engineers
The Ringworld Throne
Ringworld's Children

The Fleet of World novels are (in order):
Fleet of Worlds
Juggler of Worlds
Destroyer of Worlds
Betrayer of Worlds
Fate of Worlds

"Fate of Worlds" is actually the last book for BOTH series. Chronologically, for the Known Space timeline, all the Ringworld novels fit in between "Betrayer of Worlds" and "Fate of Worlds." Although "Fate of Worlds" is currently the last Known Space book, it ends with the possibility of more stories to come.

Niven's stories are typically "hard" science fiction, meaning stories rooted in scientific concepts, not "fantasy" science fiction.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Too much retconning of my favorite material, May 17, 2013
By 
Amazon Customer (San Diego, CA USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld (Hardcover)
I love Known Space, but it's past time to let it go. In a story space crowded with alien races, technology, and events well-explored in stories and novels written 30-50 years ago, Niven and Lerner seem to have only made room for new stories through extensive acts of retroactive continuity. Remember the awe and majesty of exploring Ringworld and the somewhat disappointment of Ringworld Engineers where half of what we thought we knew about the Ringworld was dismissed as inadequately thought-through science and character motivations? It's not as if Niven had an underlying backstory that's just now being explored -- it's more like the Star Wars prequels where the only way the continuity of the original storyline still makes sense is through extensive brainwiping of main characters at the end of the trilogy -- which is exactly the story gimmick at the core of the Worlds novels. (Except for the inconvenient memories that characters have to retain -- or be given back at key moments -- in order to be useful for the Worlds storylines.)

None of which, of course, kept me from reading all five Worlds books...
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars An OK conclusion, March 4, 2013
By 
Henry Cate III (CA. United States) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld (Hardcover)
The Ringworld series has been a fun thought experiment. The idea of a single structure having the equivalent of three million times the surface area of our earth is more than just mind boggling. It is truly inconceivable.

"Fate of Worlds" is largely focused on the Puppeteers an alien race which has a trillion people on a planet flying through space. As the fleets which were attacking the ringworld find the Puppeter's planet the Puppeteers are threaten with being conquered or even destroyed.

The story ties up some plot threads. It also opens some possibilities, so if Larry Niven is bribed with enough money I'm sure there will be another book, or more.

I find Niven's understanding of science and economics to be lacking. There are several technologies which get tossed around for plot devices but for various hand waving reasons don't have anywhere nears the impact they should.

And Niven seems to think a planet can only support a small fixed number of jobs. He has a tosses out a line about how most of the Puppeteers don't have jobs because there isn't much work to do. A thousand billion people would be able to come up with lots of new jobs. The number and variety of jobs grows with the size of the population.

All in all the story was pleasant. If you have enjoyed other Niven stories from "Known Space" give this book a try.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld, September 12, 2012
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
The continuation of the Ringworld story combined with the story line from the Fleet of Worlds novels makes this a must read for Niven fans. The entire string of books now becomes tied together in the same fashion as Asimov's "Robot" books and and Herbert's "Dune" series. I cannot get enough of Niven so I was very excited to see this new addition. However, I believe it would be extremely difficult to appreciate everything in this book without having read the other Niven offerings.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 211 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld
Fate of Worlds: Return from the Ringworld by Larry Niven (Hardcover - August 21, 2012)
$25.99 $18.92
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.