Father of Money: Buying Peace in Baghdad and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.50
  • Save: $8.15 (30%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 5 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Father of Money: Buying P... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Like New | Details
Condition: Used: Like New
Comment: Book in almost Brand New condition. 100% Money Back Guarantee. Shipped to over one million happy customers. Your purchase benefits world literacy!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Father of Money: Buying Peace in Baghdad Hardcover – June 1, 2011

14 customer reviews

See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$19.35
$10.97 $1.88

Best Books of the Month
See the Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.
$19.35 FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Only 5 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by Amazon.com. Gift-wrap available.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"... a masterstroke of psychological and practical warfare..." - The New York Post

"The American led invasion of Iraq has spawned a flood of books on its causes and its course, but few have been as enlightening as this one." - Macleans Magazine

"If you read one book on what guys on the ground faced during deployments to Iraq (and presumably Afghanistan as I have not been there), Father of Money should be it" - Jason Fritz, Ink Spots

"The writing is good throughout, indeed sometimes very good, and the audience benefits from a narrative that gradually inducts the reader into Iraqi society alongside a naïve Captain Whiteley."  - Jim Drury, Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America

"I strongly recommend this book to all junior and mid-level officers in preparation for future deployments where the army will likely be asked again to help establish local governance and jump-start the local economy." - Lt. Col. David T. Seigel, USA (Ret.), professor, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College

"While I especially wish I had read this book before I went to Iraq, I am glad to have been able to read it after I came home." - Peter Van Buren, author of We Meant Well

"While I especially wish I had read this book before I went to Iraq, I am glad to have been able to read it after I came home. Some other well-meaning American is there now, no doubt meeting some of the same questions, ignorant of the other Americans who walked those same streets. I hope he gets the chance to read Jason Whiteley’s book."—Peter Van Buren, wemeantwell.com
(Peter Van Buren wemeantwell.com)

"Father of Money is a hugely enjoyable read, a profoundly honest and powerful memoir by a U.S. Army officer forced to negotiate the moral abyss that was Iraq in 2004. Further, it is a searing analysis of the institutional blunders and foolhardy policies that characterized Bush and Rumsfeld’s invasion and their devastating impact on brave men and women who went to Iraq to serve their country. Whiteley’s courage in writing this book is inspiring."—Tom Roberts, director, A Company of Soldiers, PBS Frontline
(Tom Roberts)

"Father of Money tells the story of the Iraq war as it actually happened. Far from a tale of duty, honor, god, and country, Jason's year in Iraq was filled with moral ambiguity, and fraught with fragile loyalties and progress that was frustratingly ephemeral. He documents the momentous challenges of the U.S. occupation from the ground level, the brotherhood of war, and the imperfect compromises that marked the intersection of the U.S. government and Iraqi culture."—Garrett M. Graff, author of The Threat Matrix: The FBI at War in the Age of Global Terror
(Garrett M. Graff)

“After serving two year-long tours in Baghdad, including four months with Jason Whiteley in Al Dora in 2004, I can tell you that Father of Money is a riveting book that accurately describes what it was like trying to establish local governance after the invasion of Iraq. It was innovative junior officers like Captain Whiteley who first realized that ‘money is a weapon system’ that buys protection for U.S. troops, allegiance from local power brokers, and has the potential to douse the flames—albeit tragically only for a short period in this case—of ethnic violence and civil war. I strongly recommend this book to all junior and mid-level officers in preparation for future deployments where the army will likely be asked again to help establish local governance and jump-start the local economy.”—Lt. Col. David T. Seigel, USA (Ret.), professor, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College
(Lt. Col. David T. Seigel, USA (Ret.))

From the Back Cover


Father of Money tells the story of the Iraq war as it actually happened. Far from a tale of duty, honor, god, and country, Jason's year in Iraq was filled with moral ambiguity, and fraught with fragile loyalties and progress that was frustratingly ephemeral. He documents the momentous challenges of the U.S. occupation from the ground level, the brotherhood of war, and the imperfect compromises that marked the intersection of the U.S. government and Iraqi culture." -- Garrett M. Graff, author of The Threat Matrix: The FBI at War in the Age of Global Terror
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 208 pages
  • Publisher: Potomac Books; First Edition, 1st Printing edition (June 1, 2011)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1597975443
  • ISBN-13: 978-1597975445
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,921,239 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Jason Whiteley was born and raised in Lumberton, Texas, a small community near the Gulf Coast. He attended the United States Military Academy at West Point, where he graduated in 1999.

From 2004 to 2005, he served in Baghdad as a governance officer in the Al-Dora District of Southern Baghdad. He left the Army in 2005 to pursue a law degree and a master of science in foreign service at Georgetown University, both of which he received in 2009.

Since then, Jason has practiced law in London and Washington DC, but he stills finds time to do what he loves - tell good stories.

Customer Reviews

5 star
100%
4 star
0%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 14 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Brenda on July 25, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I have known soldiers serving in battles from WWII to Iraq and have heard and read their stories. Former Captain Whiteley is unique in his ability to articulate the depth and intensity of the moral conflicts he faced in Iraq. In addition to his excellent skills as a writer, in any genre, he was also educated at West Point and unlike some lower ranking soldiers, knew military and diplomat strategies. He was also intelligent enough to quickly see their deficiencies in this circumstance and immediately devised creative methods to cut through the bureaucratic tape that delayed the restoration of local utilities, sanitary services, security and employment opportunities so vital to the recovery of the average Iraqi family. I think all readers will share the writer's disillusionment, frustration and anguish for the victims of war as everything he accomplished for the locals was first hampered by well-meaning politicians and military consultants, and then almost completely destroyed in just a few days by nearby insurgents. Captain Whiteley further informs and alerts us on the intricacies of war in Iraq but in the end leaves us alone to wrestle for a clear and resounding answer as to whether the US troops should stay or withdraw.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Joshua P. Illian on July 16, 2011
Format: Hardcover
In full disclosure, Jason is a friend and classmate from West Point. When I was informed he had written a book on his experiences in Iraq, I was honestly a bit hesitant to read it. I've read the books of other, admittedly less talented friends, and they were a struggle to get through. However, what Jason has put together here sucks you into his experience from page one. The writing style is fast-paced. The vivid characters and immersive settings effectively put the reader in the author's boots.

Jason brings the reader into stories that are absent from the headlines of the mainstream media. However, through my own experiences in a similar position in Iraq in 2003, and the anecdotes of fellow soldiers, I'd say his experiences are representative of many who have served there. This is the story of a motivated junior officer, given the ambiguous assignment of co-opting the local power brokers in his unit's area of responsibility. With few resources and little leverage, the author wheeled and dealed to create alliances, build trust, and develop the support of populace in a highly volatile neighborhood of Baghdad.

Read Father of Money. As an OIF vet, hearing stories that were similar to my own was extremely cathartic. As a student of history, this is the type of work that contains the stories of the little victories, lessons learned and unlearned, that will ultimately shape the way the Iraq War is perceived through the ages.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Jaybeemorgan on June 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
It is the examination of the human aspect of conflict that is the most riveting facet of this book. Whiteley's candid re-telling of his decision making process while faced with morale dilemma is not only fascinating, but refreshing. All too often authors today candy coat the facts to ensure they are politically correct. But war is not politically correct. War is ultimately a clash of cultures and Whiteley's discussion on the lack of cultural preparedness of Soldiers entering into Baghdad in 2004 is outstanding. He accurately articulates what many of us felt at the time - frustration with leadership, brotherhood forged in combat and ultimately the intense pain associated with shocking loss. This book is a must read...
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By AllenMS828 on July 29, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I'm wordy, so I'll bottom-line this up front. Whether you like war stories and historical accounts of real battles, or you'd rather read a psychological study on the effects of surviving in a harsh environment by making harsh choices, or even if you'd prefer a good spy thriller novel, you should read "Father of Money".

Since I'm one of those who prefers novels over non-fiction, I probably never would have read this book if not for the fact that I knew the author back in high school, and I was curious to see what he went through in Iraq. But I'm glad I did read it, because it turned out to be a fascinating and eye-opening account of how life really is over there, at least for some soldiers (probably more of them than we'll ever know -- or would want to know). The imagery was so vivid that at times, I had to remind myself I wasn't actually reading a novel and that I didn't have to worry about whether Captain Whiteley would survive, since he obviously did in order to write the book!

I wasn't really sure what to expect when I first started reading. The description mentioned moral ambiguity, and that brought to mind things like the torture scenes in "24". But as the author himself said, it's more like "The Sopranos" than "24". Having finished the book, I certainly agree with that comparison. I also kept seeing parallels to Lawrence Block's Evan Tanner series of spy novels, in which a man is placed in international situations with limited or no resources where he has to learn to deal with the natives in order to complete his mission without dying in the process. The circumstances are different, of course, but there's a similarity in how the two men use their wits to overcome obstacles.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Set up an Amazon Giveaway

Amazon Giveaway allows you to run promotional giveaways in order to create buzz, reward your audience, and attract new followers and customers. Learn more
Father of Money: Buying Peace in Baghdad
This item: Father of Money: Buying Peace in Baghdad
Price: $19.35
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com
Want to discover more products? Check out this page to see more: military history