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Fed Up with Frenzy: Slow Parenting in a Fast-Moving World Paperback – August 1, 2012


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Fed Up with Frenzy: Slow Parenting in a Fast-Moving World + Slow Family Living: 75 Simple Ways to Slow Down, Connect, and Create More Joy + Nurturing the Soul of Your Family: 10 Ways to Reconnect and Find Peace in Everyday Life
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Sourcebooks; 1 edition (August 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1402265255
  • ISBN-13: 978-1402265259
  • Product Dimensions: 7.9 x 4.9 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (12 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,164,060 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Having trouble keeping up? Try slowing down.
Crazy busy, right? Every parent I know is crazy busy right now, saddled with a to-do list that seems to grow faster than a kid.
The only way to keep up is too juggle faster.
Or not.
What if the only way to keep up was too slow down?
"Take small steps. Walk around the neighborhood after dinner and talk and observe," advises Susan Sachs Lipman, who is making a case for what she calls the "slow parenting movement."
Author of the newly published "Fed up with Frenzy: Slow Parenting in a Fast-Moving World" (Sourcebooks) and the blog "Slow Family," Lipman suggests that we parents - not the schools, the kids, our work, our partner or the myriad other villains - are creating our own stress.
"When children are asked what they want most from their parents, the answer is often more of their attentive and unpressured time. If parents could realize that that's what kids want, they might create more opportunities for family bonding and having fun doing simple and memorable activities," she told me.
Easier said then done. I used to have a personal rule of opting out of weekend birthday parties because there are so many and each one ate into our family weekends - time I looked forward to when our family could move at our pace. I say "used to" because this rule eroded when my older daughter turned 5 and decided she loves birthday parties. This Saturday we attended two back-to-back, then added a playdate after for good measure.
My girls were deliriously happy. But also delirious.
I asked Lipman how to practice slow parenting in the face of a child's boundless energy and enthusiasm.
"Slow parenting doesn't look the same for every family and can even change from time to time within a family, based on family needs. It isn't as much about doing nothing as it is about doing things consciously and at the right pace for the family.
"I think it's important to take cues from your child. If the activities are child-driven and the child seems to thrive (and they can be accomplished without undue parental duress), then I might lean toward doing them. If the activities are causing stress, then I might choose or help a child choose which ones to let go for the sake of family harmony and down time. Much depends on what else is happening in the family, the needs of other siblings, and additional obligations at any given time," she said in an e-mail.
This approach might work on the weekends, but slow parenting seems at odds with our school days, when academics and enrichment activities fill up the hours. I asked her for some guidance for the stressed parents who have a packed schedule because they want to expand their child's universe by exposing them to dance and art and language and science.
"Slow parenting doesn't inhibit learning. It enhances it," she said. "While organized extracurricular activities can be terrific, they aren't the only way to expand a child's universe. In many cases, they may be inhibiting children's learning, experimentation, discovery and family bonding time. There is a growing body of research that shows that play time and family time, especially in early childhood, are the greatest determinants of academic and other success. Children learn through play. For that reason, in addition to a whole host of other physical and psychological benefits, we should place more value on family time and play than we typically do.
"Childhood lasts about 18 years, and there are usually plenty of opportunities to try different things. Problems can occur when, in our rush toward achievement, we try to do too many too soon or all at once."
What about for parents of older children, whose grades and activities "count" when it comes to college applications?
Lipman cited studies that found "the very character traits that lead to academic and other success - resilience, optimism, confidence, empathy and better performance in school - flourish not from extracurriculars, but from family time and parental support and love. My hope is that this information will help parents relax a little and enjoy family time on its own merits, as well as for its substantial benefits."
Overall, she said, "slow parenting" is about being present and engaging in small simple activities, like cooking together or playing tag after dinner.
Might "slow parenting" work for you? Or is the idea guilt-inducing, as if now you have to worry about fitting in a game of tag, too?" - The Washington Post

About the Author

Susan Sachs Lipman is a parenting and family expert who blogs at the award-winning Slow Family™ Online,  the Christian Science Monitor's Modern Parenthood blog, and numerous other outlets. She is the Social Media Director for the Children & Nature Network, an international movement dedicated to connecting children with nature.

More About the Author

Susan Sachs Lipman (Suz) is a parenting and family expert who blogs at the award-winning Slow Family™ Online. Slow Parenting, and her book, Fed Up with Frenzy, were named a 2012 Top 10 Parenting Trend of the Year by TIME Magazine. Suz writes for the New York Times Motherlode blog, the Christian Science Monitor's Modern Parenthood blog, and numerous other outlets. She is the Social Media Director for the Children & Nature Network, an international movement dedicated to connecting children and their families and communities with nature.

Suz has served on many boards and commissions and was named local "Girl Scout Leader of the Year." Suz lives with her husband and daughter in Mill Valley, California, where she enjoys hiking, gardening, reading, soap crafting, and food canning, in addition to sharing her ideas about these activities and more with others who wish to slow down, have fun, and reconnect with themselves and their families.

Her website is www.slowfamilyonline.com.

Customer Reviews

4.2 out of 5 stars
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Well, I haven't read the book yet, but I am so glad I found it!
Maggie spitler
Put aside all of the technology that can surround our family's lives and find some great ideas about how you can slow things down and really just be a family again!
Dad of Divas
Sometimes I find that I run out of ideas and this book gave me plenty.
Heather L. Cleveland

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amy Bowers on November 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
Slowing down the pace of your life is simple but not easy. I loved this book because it is filled with concrete ways to engage as a family.

The book begins and ends with chapters outlining the problems and many practical solutions. The bulk of the book is filled with an encyclopedic collection of ideas for slow activities, slow games, slow crafts, slow cooking, slow travel, slow celebrations and more. There are no photographs or image tutorials, so you can imagine how much is packed into over 350 pages.

Lipman has extensive scouting experience and that is reflected in many of the activities and songs. I particularly liked the catalog of call and response songs and childhood hand clapping chants that I have long forgotten. Also, many of the playground games will be introduced to my children because of this book.

This would be a great gift to yourself for your parenting bookshelf. You can browse through it when you need an idea for something simple and slow to do with your children. Most of the projects and activities are classic and use things you already have around your house. If you would like to win a copy, click down to the bottom for more information.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Andrea H. on October 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Fed Up with Frenzy: Slow Parenting in a Fast-Moving World Susan Sachs Lipman's book "Fed Up With Frenzy" inspires children of all ages to stop and smell the roses and see the rainbows in life. Pages 157-161 of Chapter 4 "Slow Kitchen" recently inspired me to go to my local farmer's market, explore and sample the array of fresh seasonal fruit and pick out the most fragrant red ripe strawberries to make delicious strawberry jam! Susan's way of thinking is timely and timeless and I look forward to implementing more of her ideas.
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8 of 11 people found the following review helpful By kiki_zee on December 19, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I was expecting a combination of thoughtful writing on why we are in a frenzy with our kids, and what to do about it. Mostly, though, this is a sort of 'cookbook'--a collection of 'recipes' for activities with children. It's fine, if that is what you want. I don't feel the need--taking the kids to a playground, the park by the river, giving them a collection of large cardboard boxes, getting out the paints, cooking together, playing games...These are enough. I feel like a book like this raises the stakes by saying, hey, you need to do all these activities to keep your kids entertained. Frankly, the kids also need to learn to play on their own--provided they have a safe neighborhood to do that. Also, this book offers nothing for the parents working multiple jobs to keep the bills paid. Their frenzy isn't about scheduled activities, but about the pressures of dealing with either the recession or long-term poverty.

This book might be what you want, but look at the table of contents, etc. before you buy.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By chitown on September 25, 2012
Format: Paperback
I've been feeling overwhelmed and quite run-down these days as I think most of we parents are. In this day and age it can be a challenge not to over-schedule and over-commit. Although we think we're giving our children and advantage by signing them up for EVERYTHING I think this hectic schedule is having an averse effect on them as well as we parents. I read this book at the perfect time. I felt I need to slow down but was not sure how. The author gives us some wonderful activities to do with our children and some great advice on becoming a "slow parent".
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4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Dad of Divas TOP 500 REVIEWER on September 8, 2012
Format: Paperback
Put aside all of the technology that can surround our family's lives and find some great ideas about how you can slow things down and really just be a family again! This was a great book that really makes you take stock of where your family was going and what you can do to bring it back to the basics to make your family even stronger. The book was full of great ideas, tips and resources that you can draw on to make this transition. Also, the author provides hours of activities that your family will simply love. I tried a few out on my own family and had the kids laughing and having an awesome time in only a few minutes. This book can really bring your family back together if they have been drifting apart, and thus, this is a great book for any family to have in their home!
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6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By James Lorick on August 17, 2012
Format: Paperback
Turn off all that rings and beeps then settle down with a mug of sun tea and this deeply charming slow-family manifesto. With fun, games, wisdom and song, Susan Sachs Lipman paves the road to recovery for those who feel compelled to force their family to carpe the diem until they just can't carpe no more. I sincerely hope that millions of helicopter parents will use Fed up With Frenzy as a guide to building a family-crafted landing pad out of recycled Baby Einstein DVDs and applications for resume-building preschools!
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