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Federalism: Political Identity and Tragic Compromise Hardcover – June 19, 2008


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 238 pages
  • Publisher: University of Michigan Press (June 19, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0472116398
  • ISBN-13: 978-0472116393
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #3,103,693 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Malcolm Feeley is Claire Sanders Clements Professor of Law and Social Policy at Berkeley's Boalt Hall School of Law, a former director of Boalt's Center for the Study of Law and Society, a former chair of the Program in Jurisprudence and Social Policy, and a past president of the Law and Society Association. Edward Rubin is Dean of the Vanderbilt University Law School and the school's first John Wade-Kent Syverud Professor of Law.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Political Science post-grad on March 5, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I disagree with the previous reviewer's comments.
I bought the book a year ago and would recommend it to students of political science, both undergrad and post-grad.
Feeley and Rubin in the text theorise the concept of federalism. Their definition of federalism is that "federalism is a political setting where a central polity grants some degee of autonomy to geographically defined regions or sub-divisions"

There is nowhere in the book where they base their theory on powersharing alone as a criteria for federating.
Read the book.
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1 of 11 people found the following review helpful By T.G.WELSH on May 5, 2011
Format: Hardcover
I haven't read this book, yet. However, I've decided to make a comment concerning a statement that I read under the title PRODUCT DESCRIPTION. The statement reads, "Federalism refers to a system in which a centralized national government shares power with member states."

I wonder if "THE Founders' would agree with that statement? I was always under the impression that the term Federalism refers to a system in which state governments share a portion of their power with a centralized national government.

Little wonder that the authors came to the conclusion that they did(judging from other statements referenced under PRODUCT DESCRIPTION).
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