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Feed Your Skin, Starve Your Wrinkles Paperback – January 1, 2009


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 304 pages
  • Publisher: Fair Winds Press (January 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1592333427
  • ISBN-13: 978-1592333424
  • Product Dimensions: 9.9 x 8 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (55 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #205,396 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Allison Tannis is a nutritional scientist and educator of nutrition and food. She is the author of Vitality: Quest for a Healthy Diet and Probiotic Rescue: How You Can Use Probiotics to Fight Cholesterol, Cancer, Superbugs, Digestive Complaints and More and host of the radio sensation Healthy Living in southern Ontario. Allison is dedicated to making the science of health easy to swallow. She writes for numerous national health magazines and can been seen as a guest on health-related television and radio shows across Canada. Allison is a Registered Holistic Nutritionist with a practice based in Newmarket, Ontario. Her specialty is helping people discover how to arm themselves with the tools they need to live healthier.


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Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
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See all 55 customer reviews
Overall, this is an excellent book, and was interesting to read.
Leanne
This book has just under 300 pages and i'm sure i'll be reading it for sometime because there is so much packed in each page.
Scott
All in all, the book makes you want to eat better foods, which means eating healthier.
Tim Martin

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

62 of 62 people found the following review helpful By Leanne TOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 23, 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I love reading about makeup and skin care, and have a small collection of books on this topic. Tannis' book, however, approaches skin care from a novel and interesting perspective: instead of looking at skincare products or cosmetic procedures that ensure better skin, she focuses instead on 100 "superfoods" that will help your skin improve itself from the inside out.

The book opens with two chapters that explain the make-up of the skin (including the various layers, such as the epidermis, etc.), the key ingredients that the skin needs for better health (such as collagen and elastin), and how the various nutrients she will later recommend help your skin.

From there, the book delves more deeply into the 100 power foods, which are divided into their respective benefits as far as skin health. (Although the title suggests that the book focuses on anti-aging foods, it actually covers many skin complaints.) These chapters are entitled: Foods that Fight Wrinkles; Foods that Moisturize; Foods that Tighten, Smooth, and Fight Sag; Foods that Brighten Your Complexion; Foods that Fight Puffiness and Inflammation; and Foods that Fight Acne and Psoriasis. Because of the way that these chapters are broken down, a reader can start incorporating all of the superfoods into her or his diet, or just incorporate those foods that will best treat her or his particular skin condition.

Each chapter opens with some background on that particular skin condition or complaint, before moving into a discussion of the foods that will help heal it. When Tannis explains each food, she clearly explains why and how the food will work on your skin, citing research from the latest scientific studies to back up her claims.
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33 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Sian Montrose on July 20, 2009
Format: Paperback
If you are looking for a breakthrough, or even just to learn something new, this is probably not the book for you, unless your knowledge of nutrition is beyond minimal. Every single "healthy" food you can probably think of is listed in this book (with the exception of milk, which supposedly might be a cause of acne) and none are really elevated as better than any of the others. Fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes... remember them, all those foods that have been marketed as healthy for ages? Yeah, well, not only are they healthy overall, but turns out they are also healthy for your skin. Not really much of a shocker. So, unless you didn't know that fruit was good for you, you're unlikely to be surprised by what you read in this book. The only two surprising foods that she mentioned were maple syrup and dark chocolate... and if I had been following health news a little more closely, the chocolate wouldn't have surprised me either.

So, why the four stars? Simply because this colourful and crisp encyclopaedia of health foods was so deliciously pleasant to read. There is something ridiculously satisfying about knowing exactly how and why each food you eat is benefiting you. For me, this delightful little book has been a major motivator in my quest to eat better. Somehow, broccoli and Brussels sprouts taste a lot better when you can look them up, as you eat them, with a handy-dandy glossary, and read about exactly how they will strengthen, moisturize, or protect your skin. The book is divided into sections such as "foods that fight wrinkles" and "foods that brighten your complexion" which makes looking foods up even more fun. Additionally, the first couple of chapters provide a quick but useful understanding of skin and its many layers and components.
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39 of 43 people found the following review helpful By Elisa VINE VOICE on May 3, 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
These days it feels like everybody is trying to capitalize on other people's breakthroughs.

So following the trend, this book seems to want to be included in the "get better skin through nutrition" current started by Dr. Nicholas Perricone with his "The Perricone Prescription".

Unlike Dr. Perricone's books however, the info in this book isn't really backed by lots of experience and trials with many patients, but rather by "poaching" someone else's research and just compiling a list of things (foods, specifically) that *others* have found to work for, not against, your beauty. Imagine taking the snippets about how chocolate has antioxidants and apricots have vitamin A etc that you can find in many women's magazines like SELF, Shape, Fitness, etc and compiling them into one volume. This is basically it.

As such, it leaves out important things that other, more knowledgeable, more experienced health writers already know, like the value of (complete) protein and aminoacids in restoring beauty and eliminating puffiness, or the fact that too much of the copper-rich foods recommended in this book can actually work against one's skin health and weight unless balanced with said protein (see Ann Louise Gittleman's books for details).

We already knew that fresh fruits and veggies and lots of water help us look better. Tell us something knew, or keep the tidbits for a magazine article, rather than stretching them into a book.
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28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Xoe Li Lu VINE VOICE on June 18, 2009
Format: Paperback Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I received this book as part of Amazon's Vine Program. I am 43 and look quite young for my age, and I am very interested in preserving my skin as I grow older, so I was excited to read this book. It was a disappointment - I didn't learn anything new (just a basic rehashing of standard beauty magazine advice, really) accompanied by a lot of recipes I would either never make or are so basic that I didn't need a recipe. It does provide the basic info that is currently available regarding anti-aging foods, but nothing you couldn't find by leafing through Vogue or any of the "healthy living" magazines.
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