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Feeding the Media Beast: An Easy Recipe for Great Publicity Hardcover – July, 2002


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Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 292 pages
  • Publisher: Purdue University Press (July 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1557532478
  • ISBN-13: 978-1557532473
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (30 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,759,056 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"A snappy read…. a painless way to bring new, young staff up to speed…gold mine of a handout to clients…" -- O’Dwyer’s PR Daily

"Getting publicity is hard...there are ways to improve one's chances...there are valuable nuggets in ‘Feeding the Media Beast’." -- The Wall Street Journal

"Without a doubt, this is the best book on PR I’ve ever read." -- Jack Trout, author of "The 22 Immutable Laws of Marketing" and "Big Brands, Big Trouble"

Witty...hilarious...smart...useful. This book should be on the reading list for anyone interested in improving their communication skills. -- ForeWord Magazine, Fall Announcements issue 2002

About the Author

Mark Mathis is a media trainer with a unique perspective. He spent nearly a decade in the television news business as a reporter/anchor. He then became a consultant to many Fortune 500 companies, such as Intel, Gateway, Victoria's Secret Catalogue, and Sprint PCS. Mathis has hosted his own radio talk show on a 50,000-watt station. For the past three years Mathis has taught the Media Rules system to people from hundreds of organizations in virtually every business and industry - public relations, politics, education, law enforcement, advertising, manufacturing, legal, health care, non-profits, etc. Mathis' Media Rules system is based on 17 years of experience on all sides of the publicity process.

Customer Reviews

Instead of reading that next novel, stop and read this book.
Rodney D. Bobbittmd
He makes it simple, and it makes sense - actually common sense (which is rare in today's flavor of the day environment).
terri vanzandt
Not only is Mathis very informative, he is very witty and entertaining.
Wes Smythe

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 19, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Mark Mathis has a wicked sense of wit and connects immediately with the reader by first building up your self-confidence and then taking you deep into the mind of the Media Beast. He dispels the myth of unpredictability and guides you through the publicity process.

Feeding the Media Beast is a extremely well organized book. First the author tells you what he is going to present to you and the proceeds to deliver a delicious array of pithy comments, witty remarks, insightful solutions, examples you can relate to, concise descriptions and snappy quotes. This book is well researched and to the point.

The text is snappy and fresh and the author often displays an uncommon perspective. He presents unique ideas on conveying information and shows you how to use this highly potent marketing machine to promote your product or idea.

I was rather impressed with how succinctly and honestly Mark Mathis describes the Media Beast and its voracious appetites. He shows you exactly how to serve up a story the beast won't be able to resist. In fact, he says it is quite predictable.

"When a Media Leader latches onto your story, big things are bound to happen."

So, how exactly do you get the Media Beast to pay attention and hunger for your
information? It seems that once you understand the nature of the beast, you can follow twelve simple rules to success.

Mark Mathis has worked as a television reporter, columnist and talk radio host. In the past few years, he has been teaching the Media Rules. These rules include the Rule of Difference, Emotion, Simplicity, Preparation, Easy, Repetition, Resource, Invention, Timing, Ego, Balance, Ambush.

You might be especially intrigued by how he answers the following questions:

1.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Steven E. Gross on October 30, 2002
Format: Hardcover
It isn't enough in this day and age to have an interesting public relations story; it also has to be presented simply and powerfully to engage the media. If you are looking at how you can garner greater public recognition without the high costs of advertisement, this is the book to read. Mathis gives an easy to read and intriguing overview of the public relations business and how to make your own business stick out amidst the frenzy of information with which the media is constantly bombarded. It is indispensable especially if you are running your own small business.
I have been in business for myself as a photographer for over 20 years. I have spent countless hours in self-promotion trying to find more notable ways to get my story across and the media interested. After reading Mathis, I realize just how much I can still improve my method of handling the media and using it to my own advantage. Mathis provides 12 rules with a wealth of examples about companies which have used them successfully as well as companies that have failed miserably because their campaign didn't adhere to them. His extensive case stories provide significant understanding of the simple nature of public relations, the difficulty in working with it and the tremendous success possible if you master it.
Mathis' strongest advice is about preparation. Most businesses spend a lot of time in managing and developing products and services, but when it comes to public relations, companies often run blindly into the media. Mathis highlights that PR-savvy companies have a plan. Media contacts are not sporadic and blind shots in the dark, rather they are carefully planned out and include a variety and repetition of contacts.
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11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Joanna Daneman #1 HALL OF FAMETOP 10 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 21, 2002
Format: Hardcover
If you are planning any kind of media campaign or publicity event, and you are inexperienced, this is a great book to read. Author Mark Mathis presents rules of encounter with the press, but in a way that makes them memorable (even if horrifying in some aspects.) In fact, the best feature of this book, to me, were the real life success and failure stories. These are things anyone can relate to. Examples: the car dealer who immediately jumped in to donate a vehicle to a family who suffered a tragedy--the day after the tragic story was published. Charity? Sure, all the way to the bank via good-will publicity.
Anyone who has had any dealings with the media knows that stories get garbled, facts are lost or worse, in error, and the press picks up on the worst or most trivial aspect of your message while tossing away the "meat." Plus our age of a 15-second attention span applies to the media; you'd better get your message out quickly and clearly or the media will roll over you on to the next soundbite.
My own recent encounter with a well-respected newspaper and an excellent reporter taught me that their angle on a story, which I thought was dead wrong, was the one that WOULD be published and my contrary facts would be pretty much ignored. I probably made quite a few mistakes I could have avoided, had I read this book.
If you intend to be feeding this "beast" you'd do well to read this book. It isn't a complete manual on publicity campaigns, but it is so entertainingly written that you will remember those important principles.
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